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A Guided Highlighted Reading
“Hurricanes: Earth’s Mightiest Storms”
by Patricia Lauber
Summary and Craft
Guided Highlighted Reading for Summary and Craft of Hurricanes by Patricia Lauber
Lauber, Patricia. Hurricanes: Earth’s Mightiest Storms. New York: Scholastic, 1996. (1996)
From “The Making of a Hurricane” Used by permission of Scholastic, Inc.
1.
Great whirling storms roar out of the oceans in many parts of the world. They are called by
2.
several names—hurricane, typhoon, and cyclone are the three most familiar ones. But no
3.
matter what they are called, they are all the same sort of storm. They are born in the same way,
4.
in tropical waters. They develop the same way, feeding on warm, moist air. And they do the
5.
same kind of damage, both ashore and at sea. Other storms may cover a bigger area or have
6.
higher winds, but none can match both the size and the fury of hurricanes. They are earth’s
7.
mightiest storms.
8.
Like all storms, they take place in the atmosphere, the envelope of air that surrounds the earth
9.
and presses on its surface. The pressure at any one place is always changing. There are days when air is
10.
sinking and the atmosphere presses harder on the surface. These are the times of
11.
high pressure. There are days when a lot of air is rising and the atmosphere does not press
12.
down as hard. These are times of low pressure. Low-pressure areas over warm oceans give
13.
birth to hurricanes.
Prompts for “Hurricane” Use one color of highlighter to mark the text from these prompts.
In line #2, find and highlight the two other names for hurricanes.
In line #4, find and highlight where hurricanes develop.
In line #4, find and highlight what hurricanes feed on as they develop.
In line #5, find and highlight where hurricanes do damage.
In line #10, find and highlight what happens when air is sinking.
In line #11, find and highlight what these times of sinking pressure are called.
In line #12, find and highlight what gives birth to hurricanes.
Guided Highlighted Reading for Summary and Craft of Hurricanes by Patricia Lauber
Lauber, Patricia. Hurricanes: Earth’s Mightiest Storms. New York: Scholastic, 1996. (1996)
From “The Making of a Hurricane” Used by permission of Scholastic, Inc.
1.
Great whirling storms roar out of the oceans in many parts of the world. They are called by
2.
several names—hurricane, typhoon, and cyclone are the three most familiar ones. But no
3.
matter what they are called, they are all the same sort of storm. They are born in the same way,
4.
in tropical waters. They develop the same way, feeding on warm, moist air. And they do the
5.
same kind of damage, both ashore and at sea. Other storms may cover a bigger area or have
6.
higher winds, but none can match both the size and the fury of hurricanes. They are earth’s
7.
mightiest storms.
8.
Like all storms, they take place in the atmosphere, the envelope of air that surrounds the earth
9.
and presses on its surface. The pressure at any one place is always changing. There are days when air is
10.
sinking and the atmosphere presses harder on the surface. These are the times of
11.
high pressure. There are days when a lot of air is rising and the atmosphere does not press
12.
down as hard. These are times of low pressure. Low-pressure areas over warm oceans give
13.
birth to hurricanes.
On the reverse side of your paper, write a 1-4 line summary of what
you have learned about hurricanes.
Guided Highlighted Reading for Craft and Structure: With another copy of the passage or a different color
highlighter pen, students highlight the following.
In line #1, find and highlight the vivid verb that the author uses to describe how a hurricane or storm comes out of
the ocean.
When an author gives human characteristics to things that are not human, it is called personification. In line #3,
find and highlight the example of personification in line four.
•In lines #3- #5, find and highlight the signal word that is repeated four times showing that hurricanes, typhoons,
and cyclones are alike or similar. (
•In line #3, find and highlight the two phrases containing the word “same” that show that the storms are alike or
similar.
•In lines #4 and #5, find and highlight the two phrases containing the word “same” that show that the storms are
alike or similar.
In lines #6 and #7, find and highlight the words that repeat part of the title of this selection.
•In line #8, find and highlight the words the author uses to introduce more similarities or things that make storms
alike.
When an author compares two unlike things without using the words like or as, it is called a metaphor.
In line #8, find and highlight the metaphor that the author uses to give a definition for the word atmosphere.
When an author gives human characteristics to things that are not human, it is called personification. In lines #12
and #13, find and highlight the example of personification.
Guided Highlighted Reading for Summary and Craft of Hurricanes by Patricia Lauber
Lauber, Patricia. Hurricanes: Earth’s Mightiest Storms. New York: Scholastic, 1996. (1996)
From “The Making of a Hurricane” Used by permission of Scholastic, Inc.
1.
Great whirling storms roar out of the oceans in many parts of the world. They are called by
2.
several names—hurricane, typhoon, and cyclone are the three most familiar ones. But no
3.
matter what they are called, they are all the same sort of storm. They are born in the same way,
4.
in tropical waters. They develop the same way, feeding on warm, moist air. And they do the
5.
same kind of damage, both ashore and at sea. Other storms may cover a bigger area or have
6.
higher winds, but none can match both the size and the fury of hurricanes. They are earth’s
7.
mightiest storms.
8.
Like all storms, they take place in the atmosphere, the envelope of air that surrounds the earth
9.
and presses on its surface. The pressure at any one place is always changing. There are days when air is
10.
sinking and the atmosphere presses harder on the surface. These are the times of
11.
high pressure. There are days when a lot of air is rising and the atmosphere does not press
12.
down as hard. These are times of low pressure. Low-pressure areas over warm oceans give
13.
birth to hurricanes.
Talking about hurricanes…
Critical Questions
• What does the author think about hurricanes?
• What “figures of speech” did the author use
to describe hurricanes?
• The author compares hurricanes to other
storms, discuss what they have in common?
• How does the author describe the conditions
that cause the “birth of hurricane?”
• What are the benefits of knowing the
conditions that cause a hurricane?