Adjectives and Adverbs - Eurolink Courses Index

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Transcript Adjectives and Adverbs - Eurolink Courses Index

What is the difference between an adjective
and an adverb?
Quite simply, an adjective describes a noun. It tells us
how someone or something is.
A big house
A fat man
An adverb describes a verb. It tells us how, where, when
or how often something happens.
e.g. He/She drives carelessly.
How does he/she drive?
Carelessly.)
Adjectives go before the noun. (A beautiful girl).
They can also be used alone after the verb “to be” and
some other verbs.
(John is short, they are happy, you look tired ) etc.
There are two kinds of adjective: opinion adjectives
(beautiful, luxurious) which show what you think about
somebody or something,
and fact adjectives which give
factual information about age, size, colour, material
etc. Opinion adjectives always go before a fact adjective.
eg. A luxurious old English Bentey-
Order of adjectives.
Remember - opinion adjectives go before fact adjectives
e.g. a beautiful bronze statue.
When we have two or more fact adjectives in a
sentence we usually put them in the following order.
Opinion
Size
Age
Shape
Colour origin
Material
Noun
A beautiful
large
old
round
brown
wooden
table
French
In normal situations we would only use two or three
fact adjectives at the most (a beautiful round wooden table)
Adverbs can be one word (dangerously)
or a phrase (in the bank)
and they show:
Manner
How?
He drives dangerously. (How?)
Place
Where?
His car is here. (Where?)
Time
When?
She flew to Madrid yesterday. (When?)
Frequency
How Often?
They always eat out. (How often?)
Adverbs usually go after the verb. (He runs quickly).
Adverbs of frequency go after auxilliary verbs and the verb “to be”, but
before the principal verb e.g. She is always late for work.
He has never been to London
They usually come to work by train.
Adverbs 2
Formation of Adverbs.
We usually form an adverb by adding “ly” to the
adjective e.g.
careful – carefully, but some are irregular and do not
follow this rule.
Adjective
Adverb
good
well
fast
fast
hard
hard
early
early
late
late
Adjectives of: Positive Comparative
Superlative
one syllable
short
shorter than
the shortest of/in
two syllables
ending in
es,ly,y,w
happy
ugly
happier than
uglier than
the happiest
the ugliest
two or more
syllables
modern
more modern
expensive more expensive
John is short.
Peter is shorter than John.
Mark is the shortest in the class.
Mark is the shortest of all.
the most modern
the most expensive
This hotel is expensive.
That hotel is more expensive.
Our hotel is the most expensive
of all
Adverbs with the same form as
adjectives
fast
faster
the fastest
two syllable adverbs ending in -ly
early
earlier
the earliest
two syllables
often
more often
the most often
or compound adverbs – adjective + ly
clearly
more
clearly
the most
clearly
Irregular
Forms
Positive
Comparative
Superlative
good/well
better than
the best
bad/badly
worse than
the worst
much
more than
the most
many/a lot of
more than
the most
little
less than
the least
far
further/farther than
the furthest/farthest