Lessons from Pennyvenie - Institute of Quarrying Australia

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Transcript Lessons from Pennyvenie - Institute of Quarrying Australia

photo by Gollings Photography
Sustainability
through a European lens
by Martin Isles
BSc MSc CGeol FGS FIAT FIQ
Director, Health & Safety, Mineral Products Association, UK
Chairman, H&S Committee, European Aggregates Assocn (UEPG)
President, The Institute of Quarrying, UK
“The capacity to endure”
“Maintenance of responsibility”
“Social, Environmental and Economic stewardship” =
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Sustainable Development
Sustainable Development
 Whole spectrum of disciplines & fields – from macro to micro
 Illustrative examples from Europe: Aggregates; Cement; Concrete
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 31 Member Countries
 Represents Industry with:
 Sales of €20 billion
 3 billion tonnes of
aggregates per year
 24,000 quarries
 14,000 companies
(high % SMEs)
 250,000 employed
(including contractors).
UEPG Secretariat in Brussels
Ivana Oceano Sandrine Devos Arnaud Colson
Secretary Public Affairs Manager President
Miette Dechelle
Public Affairs Manager
Dirk Fincke
Secretary General
Website: Email: UEPG aisbl, Rue d’Arlon 21, 1050 Brussels, Belgium www.uepg.eu [email protected]
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Aggregates Production: Europe
European Output, Billions Tonnes
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3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
2007
5%
2008
2%
2009
2010
52%
Recycled
Marine
Manuf'd
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Europe is continuing to suffer from
economic recession

Total EU/EFTA demand down 20%
from 2007 to 3bn tonnes in 2011

Some very severe declines:
 Ireland -75%
 Spain -65%
 Several others -50%

Decline lagged recession by 2-3 years,
return to growth: very slow

Crushed stone % growing;
S&G declining;
Recycled, marine, manufactured
fairly static.
2%
Sand & Gravel
39%

2011
Crushed Stone
Economic Pillar
Economic Pillar
11.3
National Aggregates
Production in 2010
tonnes/capita
Average: 5.5 tonnes/capita
13.7
11.1
4.5
3.5
7.6
4.0
15.7
8.6
8.9
6.5
5.6
5.0
4.3
3.9
6.5
6.4
4.5
6.3
4.9
6.6
5.1
5.3
11.5
3.9
5.0
2.3
2.1
4.3
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3.5
3.0
3.2
4.2
16.0
Fatalities – CSI Initiatives
Social Pillar
 Globally, about 200 fatalities in aggregates industry/year
 30 fatalities in the European aggregates industry/year
 60% of fatalities were Contractors
 Most common cause (50%) is Operation of Mobile Plant (trucks,
loaders, etc)
 Health & safety definitions & statistical indicators: convergence towards
World Business Council for Sustainable Development Cement Sustainability Inititiave
 Two CSI initiatives adopted
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see: www.wbcsdcement.org
The Safety Imperative
Social Pillar
 Developing Fatality & Accident Prevention
Best Practice
 Disseminating through www.safequarry.com
http://www.safequarry.com/sharing-good-practice.aspx
 Development of competent workforces
 Major success with “Safer by Design
Project”, now being promoted internationally
 Checklist to ensure key safety features are
supplied when specifying heavy mobile plant
http://www.safequarry.com/safer_by_design.aspx
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Occupational Health
Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS)

UEPG is one of 17 European signatories to the
bipartite multi-sectoral EU ‘Silica’ Social
Dialogue Agreement administered by ‘NePSi’,
protecting 2 million workers www.nepsi.eu

Biennial reporting to European Commission

2012 reporting demonstrated continuous
improvement across all 12 KPIs

Major efforts to encourage the Construction
sector (Employers & Unions) to join NePSi

Heading for a Europe-wide legislative outcome.
Strong preference for inclusion in the EU Chemical
Agents Directive and not the EU Carcinogens &
Mutagens Directive
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Social Pillar
Special Focus on . . .
– Biodiversity
– Water Management
– Marine Aggregates
• Key Objectives
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– Promote sustainable and local
access to resources (including in
‘Natura 2000’ areas)
– Must get Biodiversity expertise
– Excellence in Water Management
– Best practices in marine
aggregates extraction
– Monitor soil, waste, air, issues
Environmental Pillar
Biodiversity Task Force
• Defined a UEPG strategy 2011-2015:
– To raise awareness among UEPG members and
stakeholders (EC, MEPs, NGOs) of the compatibility
of the extractive industry with biodiversity
conservation.
– To improve our contribution to biodiversity
• Defined a position on ecological offsets:
– Rehabilitation is the best method for the
aggregates industry to restore biodiversity,
therefore UEPG does not support financial
offsetting for the aggregates sector
• Promotes good practices through:
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– database of case studies
Environmental Pillar
Water Management Task Force
 UEPG has developed Guidelines on
Water Policy & Management
 Online database of case studies
 Implementation of the Water
Framework Directive; revision of
the Groundwater Directive;
Council conclusions on Integrated
Flood Management
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Environmental Pillar
Marine Aggregates
 Marine extraction is growing in countries on North Sea
 Focus on Marine Strategy Framework Directive
 Issues are spatial planning, biodiversity, noise, etc
 Developing knowledge, best practice & industry image
 In many cases, is seen as ‘least impact’ solution
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Environmental Pillar
Biodiversity Offsetting
UK Example: SD & Aggregates
UK Government Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
setting up a pilot scheme looking to create a market through the planning system
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•
Six pilot areas are
participating; local
authorities and significant
stakeholders investigating
a voluntary undertaking of
offsetting methods.

The aggregates sector will
be in a position to offer
conservation credits for
sale to developers who
would then be able to
offset the impact of their
development proposals.
Waters Act
UK Example: SD & Aggregates
 Will introduce transfer licensing to dewatering activities for the first
time in the UK
 The aggregates sector has been dewatering quarries for mineral
extraction for many years
 There are 2 types of licence:
 Abstraction licence where the dewater is used on site for dust
suppression, mineral washing, etc.
 Transfer licence where dewater is discharged
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Waters Act
(continued)
UK Example: SD & Aggregates
• Proposed timetable for implementation
October 2012 to 2014, but Guidance
document still to be consulted upon
– likely to delay commencement
• There will be a need to demonstrate pumping/
dewatering in 4 years prior to 1 October 2012
• There will also be a need to understand
volumes pumped and whether these are
consumptive or non-consumptive uses
• There will be an increased focus on metering.
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Cembureau is the European trade association for cement
 27 Full Members are the national cement industry associations and cement
companies of the EU (minus Cyprus, Malta and Slovakia) plus Norway,
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Switzerland and Turkey. Croatia and Serbia are Associate Members.
World Cement Production
China, 57.3%
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3.6 billion tonnes in 2011
EU ETS
UK Example: SD & Cement
European Union Emissions Trading Scheme
• Cap-and-trade scheme that applies to energy intensive sectors
with the aim of reducing CO2 emissions. A limit or cap is set on
the emissions of CO2 within the EU
• Participants are allocated a certain number of allowances within
the cap. Exceptions are electricity generators who will have to
purchase allowances to cover their emissions from 2013 onwards
• Efficient businesses will have surplus allowances that can be sold,
inefficient businesses will have to buy allowances
• EU ETS covers around 43% of UK greenhouse gas emissions
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• EU ETS does not cover transport, domestic energy use or nonenergy intensive industries.
CRC
UK Example: SD & Cement
Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy Efficiency Scheme
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• Aim is to improve energy efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions.
• Includes organisations above a certain level of energy use.
• Designed to raise awareness in large organisations, especially at
senior level
• Does not apply to those emissions already regulated by the EU
Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS)
• Each year allowances are bought to cover CO2 emissions over the
coming year. Carbon price currently set at £12 / t CO2. At the end of
the year allowances covering CO2 emissions are surrendered
• A league table ranks participants in terms of energy efficiency
improvement
• Scheme currently under review re simplification.
Climate Change Levy
UK Example: SD & Cement
• A levy on the use of energy in industry, commerce, agriculture
and the public sector
• Introduced in 1998 to help UK meet its legally binding target of a
12.5% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and move towards
the government’s domestic goal of a 20% reduction in CO2
emissions by 2010
• It is effectively an energy tax on non-domestic users, with the
revenue from the levy being recycled in the form of a discount on
employers’ National Insurance Contributions
• Some energy-intensive industries have negotiated a rebate on the
levy through Climate Change Agreements.
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UK Example: SD & Cement
Climate Change Agreements
• UK Government has recognised the need to give special
consideration to energy-intensive industries with regards to climate
change, given their energy use and their need to compete
internationally
• Consequently, energy-intensive industries can obtain a 65% discount
from the Climate Change Levy (90% for electricity from 2013),
provided they meet challenging targets for improving their energy
efficiency or reducing their carbon emissions.
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UK Example: SD & Cement
Focus on use of waste derived fuels
• Waste-derived materials: tyres,
waste solvents, Meat & Bone Meal
biomass, paper/plastic mix,
packaging, RDF, sludge, wood
• In EU, 22% replacement of fossil
fuels on average (up to 70% in
some EU regions)
• In UK, 38% replacement of fossil
fuels in 2010 - equivalent to
401,194 tonnes of coal.
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UK Concrete Industry Sustainable Construction Strategy
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 UK sustainability drivers
 UK government carbon plan
 Zero carbon homes
 UK carbon calculators
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UK Example: SD & Concrete
UK Concrete Industry Sustainable Construction
 Vision
 Commitments
 Progress
 Concrete solutions
 Embodied CO2
 Responsible sourcing
 Waste
 Recycled aggregates
 Water
UK Example: SD & Concrete
 UK Carbon Plan
 Minus 35% emissions by 2022;
 Minus 50% by 2027
 By 2050 emissions from buildings need to be close to ZERO
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UK Example: SD & Concrete
To delivery its vision and strategic objectives …..
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UK Example: SD & Concrete
Advantages of concrete
•
•
•
•
Thermal performance
Durability / robustness
Flood and Fire resistance
Acoustic performance
Embodied CO2 in concrete
• Mostly attributable to the cement; can be off-set by addition of:
 Ground granulated blastfurnace slag
 Fly ash
 Limestone fines
Waste
• In the UK, the concrete industry uses 20 times more waste than it
produces.
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UK Example: SD & Concrete
Communicating . . .
94% of BRMCA ready-mixed concrete
production is responsibly sourced
to BES 6001 (88% of all concrete)
CO2 from comparable concrete mixes is
16.3% less than the 1990 baseline
There is very little waste associated with
ready-mixed concrete as there is no
packaging and the precise volume
required can be delivered.
But . . . . .
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ONLY ONE EARTH but World Footprint = 1.3 earths
Quarrying & mineral products
are rising to the challenge
but to help succeed . . .
we all need to . . . . . . . .
Thank you for listening
[email protected]