Return to Work - Hettrick, Cyr & Associates, Inc.

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Transcript Return to Work - Hettrick, Cyr & Associates, Inc.

Steps Toward a Return to Work
Program
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Outline developed by:
 Mike Fredebeil (Asst. Vice President, Willis
Construction Group)
 James Skelton (Sr. Loss Control Consultant,
BB&T)
 Jerome A. Stevenson Jr. (Corp. Safety Dir.,
L.E. Schwartz & Son, Inc.)
Steps Toward a Return to Work
Program
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Obtain commitment from your management
team.
Develop a long term approach as opposed to
short term solutions.
See the injured employee as a team
Steps Toward a Return to Work
Program
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Develop a Return to W
Appoint a resource to
program.
Provide training to key
Steps Toward a Return to Work
Program
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Provide each employee a copy of the
Return to Work policy.
 Managers.
 Key personnel.
 Current & New Employees.
Steps Toward a Return to Work
Program
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Develop a strong Safety and Accident
Prevention program.
 This program should include strong safety
policies.
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Develop and enforce a strong discipline
policy.
Return to Work Facts
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Employees out of work longer than 6
months have a 50% of returning to work.
Litigation is 50% lower if contact is made
to an injured employee within 7 days.
Employees out of work 14 or more days
have financial difficulties.
Effective Disability Management, 2001. Liberty Mutual.
Return to Work Facts
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Litigated claims can result in increased
claims’ cost (up to 80%).
Return to Work doesn’t always mean Light
Duty.
Returning injured employees to work
reduces Workers’ Comp. Premiums.
Effective Disability Management, 2001. Liberty Mutual.
Return to Work Facts
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Each company pays for insurance premiums.
The insurance company pays the injured
worker:
 Medical benefits.
 Lost Wages (66 2/3%) and indemnity.
How Cost Affects the Bottom Line, 2003. BB&T.
Cost of Workers Compensation
STATE RATE FOR EACH JOB TYPE
X PAYROLL FOR EACH JOB TYPE
MANUAL PREMIUM
X Experience Modifier (Safety Grade)
= STANDARD PREMIUM
GOOD
AVERAGE
POOR
.85
1.00
1.50
Cost Effect on Workers’ Comp.
THOUSANDS
$200
$150
$150K
$100
$50
$85K
.85 MOD
$100K
1.00 MOD
How Cost Affects the Bottom Line, 2003. BB&T.
1.50 MOD
Return to Work Facts
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Using the previous chart strict risk
management practices can result in:
 Increased profitability.
 Reduced losses.
 Reduced workers’ compensation premiums.
Return to Work Facts
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Strong safety practices will include:
 Strict risk management.
 Strong claims adjustment.
 Strong Return to Work program.
 Employees must know that these practices are
the company’s policy.
Return to Work Techniques
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Consider terminology:
 Modified duty.
 Temporary alternative position.
 Permanent alternative position.
 Review the OSHA 300 Log.
Return to Work Techniques
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Develop modified or alternative duties.
 Even if they are not currently available.
 Duties should always be forwarded to the
physician.
 Keep a rolling database of duties.
Let the physician modify or specify limitations.
Return to Work Techniques
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Provide a copy of job descriptions to the
physician.
Ask representatives (from the physician’s
office) to visit your job-sites.
Post required documentation in Public
Access areas.
 I.e. – Lobby, HR Manger’s office, jobsite
trailer.
Return to Work Techniques
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Provide every employee a copy of your
return to Work package.
 Obtain signatures indicating reception.
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If an employee is injured give him or her a
copy of the W/C laws and obtain a
signature.
Let the employee initial by a copy of the
Panel Physician at the time of treatment.
Return to Work Techniques
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Contact the employee within 7 calendar
days.
 Studies reflect that In-touch Employers are
more likely get employees back to work.
 Morale calls improve communication and keeps
the employee involved with company news.
 The company can obtain general assessments.
Return to Work Techniques
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Require accidents to be reported promptly
(w/in 24 hours).
 Discipline the violator.
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Always require a drug screen at the time
of medical treatment.
Return to Work Techniques
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Track all time.
 Modified, Alternative, or Lost.
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Lost time is most expensive.
 Wages paid by carrier.
Effects premium.
Return to Work Techniques
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Lost time (cont’d):
 Employer must rehire.
 Employer must retrain.
 Will the new employee fit in.
 Quality of work, dependability, etc.
Return to Work
Benefits
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Reduces lost time severity.
Employees are seen by Occ. Medicine
physicians that can provide quality for
work-related injuries.
Potential to avoid legal complications.
Shifts focus to an ability as opposed to
disability.
Return to Work
Benefits
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Employee has attachment and sense of job
security.
Employee stays active.
Positive impact on worker morale and
productivity.
Reduced Costs.
Sample Return to Work Forms
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Following forms are available in electronic
format:
 Georgia State Board Return to Work
 Georgia DOAS Return to Work
 Always file a claim for your states Subsequent
Injury Trust Fund (if applicable).
Sample Return to Work Forms
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Following forms are available in electronic
format:
 Return to Work Policy
 Panel of Physician
 Refusal of Treatment
 Texas State Board Return to Work
Sample Return to Work Forms
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(cont’d):
 Managed Care Organization (MCO).
 Drug/Alcohol Screen Consent Form.
 Modified Duty Acceptance Form.