Cold Weather

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Transcript Cold Weather

HYPOTHERMIA, FROSTBITE,
AND YOU
Oh My!
Brrrrrrrr…
Baby it’s cold outside
Why Alaska’s Kids Need To
Know Cold Weather Safety
Alaska is a cool state (cold winters &
cool summers).
All major towns in Alaska lie along the
coast or beside a river...AND…
Water takes heat away from your body 25 times
faster than air.
Many cold injury dangers are silent dangers.
Being outside is fun, but you need to be safe.
What is HYPOTHERMIA?
Normo- Normal
Hypo- Beneath, under, less than normal
Hyper-
Above, over, more than normal
Thermo- Heat
Our normal body temperature is 98.6 F, and a hypothermic
state is when our core temperature is below 96 F, a
temperature at which normal brain and muscle activity are
impaired.
Signs and Symptoms of
Hypothermia
Watch for the UMBLES
STUMBLES
FUMBLES
MUMBLES
GRUMBLES
You will not realize this is happening!
How Does Your Body Lose
Heat?
4 ways
RADIATION
-the loss of heat from the body due to
surrounding air being colder.
CONDUCTION -loss of heat through direct contact with an
object. Water conducts heat from the body 25
times faster than air.
CONVECTION - a process of conduction where one of the
objects is in motion, like wind.
EVAPORATION -heat loss from converting liquid to gas
How Does Your Body Regulate
Your Internal Temperature?
Your brain acts as your thermostat!
How Does Your Body Regulate
Your Internal Temperature?
If you were faced with a limited amount of
fuel supply, and it was really cold outside,
wouldn’t you start to shut off the heat in
rooms that your family wasn’t using, like
the guestroom or basement?
Your body does the same thing.
VASODILATION
2 NEW WORDS
And
VASOCONSTRICTION
How Does Your Body
Maintain Its Internal
Temperature?
SWEATING
Cools the body through
evaporative cooling.
SHIVERING
Generates heat through an increase
in muscle activity.
BEHAVIORAL Putting on or taking off
layers of clothing allows
RESPONSE
your body to heat or cool
itself.
But, what if these responses don’t work?
Let’s Play the Hypothermia
Game!
Situation 1:
You are out winter camping. You are well
equipped and well dressed for the
experience. There is an extreme wind,
and the air is bitterly cold. You start to
feel sore and shiver.
Could you be in danger of hypothermia?
Yes!!!!
Let’s Play the Hypothermia
Game!
Situation 2:
You go hiking on a fall afternoon. It is in
the mid-60s.
Could you be in danger of hypothermia?
Yes!!!!
Let’s Play the Hypothermia
Game!
Situation 2:
You go hiking on a fall afternoon. It is in
the mid-60s.
What if an unexpected rain shower passes over with
pouring rain and gusty winds, and you have no rain
equipment?
Let’s Play the Hypothermia
Game!
Situation 3:
You are hiking on a 70 degree day, and
you are walking across a fallen log over
an icy mountain river.
Could you be in danger of hypothermia?
Yes!!!!
Let’s Play the Hypothermia
Game!
Situation 3:
You are hiking on a 70 degree day, and
you are walking across a fallen log over
an icy mountain river.
What if you slip and fall, and get completely soaked
in the late afternoon, as the sun is going down and a
chill picks up in the air?
Let’s Play the Hypothermia
Game!
Although the first case seems the most realistic, as you
can see, a potentially dangerous hypothermic situation
can occur on a 70 degree day.
So how can the conditions of an otherwise warm day turn
dangerous?
Just Do The Math!
INADEQUATE CLOTHING
+
COLD
+
WATER
+
_____WIND_____
HYPOTHERMIA
What is the Difference Between
Hypothermia and Frostbite?
Hypothermia is when
the body core
temperature cools
below 96 degrees F.
Frostbite occurs when
cells or the area
between cells form
ice crystals and
freeze.
Both are not fun.
What is the Difference Between
Hypothermia and Frostbite?
Extremities are most likely to be
frostbitten, since they are the first “rooms”
to have their heat shut off.
Signs and Symptoms of Frostbite
MILD FROSTNIP- Skin is white in
color, feels normal, and may still
have some sensation.
SUPERFICIAL FROSTBITE- skin
is white in color, feels soft, and is
numb.
DEEP FROSTBITE- skin is
white in color, feels hard, and is
numb.
What is the Best Way to Avoid
Cold Weather Injury?
PREVENTION!
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
The most important word when dressing for
LAYERS
cold weather is ____________.
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
Layering is the key to staying warm and dry.
When you layer, you insulate your body by
trapping warm air between your layers.
Layering gives you control to heat up or
cool down your body by putting on or taking
off layers.
You should always have at least 3 layers on
when you go out in cold weather.
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
MATERIAL CHOICE is important because some
materials keep you warmer when wet.
WOOL
Dries quickly, insulates when wet,
and is not flammable.
FLEECE Will insulate when wet, but will melt as
plastic.
COTTON Cold and sticks to skin when wet, and it
burns easily.
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
SO WHAT ARE THESE LAYERS?
LAYER 1- Innermost layer- long underwear and a
long sleeved shirt.
LAYER 2- Middle layer- this layer will serve as the
insulating layer. You want something that is going
to keep you warm like wool or fleece pants and
shirts or sweaters.
LAYER 3- Outside layer-finish with a windproof and
waterproof shell. You want to protect your insulating
layer from wind and water.
Dressing for cold weather
1. Long underwear
3. Windproof or
waterproof coat
2. Wool or fleece
sweaters and pants
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
Now that we’ve got our layers on, what are we
forgetting about?
HEAD
HANDS
FEET
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
HEAD
50% of your body heat is lost through your
head.
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
HANDS
If your hands are unprotected, they may be
subject to frostbite.
PREVENTION:
How to Dress for Cold Weather
A safety fashion guide
FEET
Don’t wear tennis shoes! They get wet easily
and don’t provide insulation. Wear boots that
can be waterproofed or are water resistant.
Also, you should wear warm socks that aren’t
cotton. You can layer socks too.
HYPOTHERMIA,
FROSTBITE, AND YOU
Oh My!
The keys to being safe in cold weather are:
PREPARATION and PREVENTION.
Be prepared for cold weather and stay dry and you’ll
be able to enjoy the great outdoors happily and safely.
DON’T GET CAUGHT IN
THE COLD
This project was partially funded by NOAA Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Funds administered by
the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the Alaska Sustainable Salmon Fund.