agriculture fisheries and food authority

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Transcript agriculture fisheries and food authority

Effect of current changes on the Kenyan
tea industry & its future trends
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OVERVIEW OF THE PRESENTATION.
 Institutional Changes
 Climate change
 Other non- Economic Factors
 Way forward.
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 Institutional Changes
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Our Crops, Our Wealth!
Our Tea
Our Coffee
Our Fibre Crops
Our Nuts & Oil Crops
Our Sugar Cane
Our Pyrethrum & other
Industrial Crops
Our Food Crops
Our Horticultural Crops
Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Authority
Presented by: ALFRED BUSOLO
INTERIM DIRECTOR GENERAL
AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD AUTHORITY
• The Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Authority (AFFA) was
established through an Act of Parliament, the Agriculture,
Fisheries and Food Authority Act of 2013.
• The Act consolidates the laws on the regulation and
promotion of agriculture and makes provision for the
respective roles of the national and county governments in
agriculture and related matters, in line with the provisions of
the Fourth Schedule of the Constitution of Kenya.
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AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD AUTHORITY
The Authority is the successor to the institutions existing before
the commencement of the AFFA Act and the Crops Act.
These are the Coconut Development Authority, Kenya Sugar
Board, Tea Board of Kenya, Coffee Board of Kenya, Horticultural
Crops Development Authority, Pyrethrum Board of Kenya,
Cotton Development Authority and Sisal Board of Kenya.
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 Climate Change ( Kenya Tea climate
change strategy)
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Climate change
• Tea production depends heavily on the stability of weather
parameters.
• Tea thrives in stable climatic conditions of well-distributed annual
rainfall above 1200 mm, temperature range of 18-300C and well
drained soils. Past and projected climate patterns including
extremes in many tea growing areas are expected to adversely
affect the performance of tea in Kenya. Climate extremes of
drought, frosts and hail constrain tea production.
• Vulnerability of tea farmers to climate variability and extremes
arise from the high dependency of tea incomes in the overall
household income.
• The proportion of tea earnings in household overall income ranges
between 40-70%.
• The impact of tea on forests is a major challenge. Fuel wood is
widely used in tea processing as well by farmers and labourers
leading to environmental degradation in the environs of tea growing
areas.
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CLIMATE SMART TEA INDUSTRY
• Climate change and variability overwhelmingly influence
Kenya’s tea performance.
• Both adaptation and mitigation measures are required to make
Kenya’s tea industry resilient to climate change and maintain
global competitiveness.
• Adaptation strategies aim at strengthening the farmers’
capacity to better cope with, manage or adjust to changing
conditions, hazards, risks, or harness the opportunities that will
come with climate change.
• Strategies on mitigation focus on curbing Green House Gas
emission from the tea industry
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Adaptation strategies
There are six components under adaptation strategies
1. Climate compatible tea clones
2. Improving farm management practices
3. Crop diversification
4. Market product diversification and value addition
5. Harmonization and standardization of certification
requirements
6. Risk management
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Mitigation strategies
1.
a)
b)
c)
d)
2.
a)
b)
Emissions reduction strategic Interventions
Energy efficient technology
Agro-forestry in tea growing area to meet wood fuel demand
Explore alternative sources of energy such as wind, solar and
hydro.
Improving road infrastructure in tea growing areas
Fuel wood use strategic Interventions
Enforce rule requiring every 4 hectares of tea have
corresponding 1 hectare of forest plantation
Regulation for factories to drying the wood before use in
order to improve the efficiency of burning
c) Adoption of energy efficiency technologies in the tea industry
for carbon credit market
 Other Non- Economic factors
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Other non- economic factors/ changes affecting the tea industry in Kenya include
• Price of tea will keep oscillating like in most other
commodities.
• High inflation and reducing disposable income.
• Increase in population hence increase in per capita
consumption.
• Competition from other beverages( Share of Throat)
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PROPOSED WAY FORWARD
• Product diversification.
• Domestic promotion of Tea on a health platform to continue.
• Target the expanding demographic segment of the youth in
promotion campaigns.
• Development of Government Policies to promote
competitiveness of the tea industry in Kenya.
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UPCOMING CONFERENCE
• 1st Africa Tea Science
Symposium & Exhibition 23rd –
25th May 2016
• Precursor to the 22nd FAO –
IGG Conference 25th – 27th
May 2016
• To be held at Enashipai
Resort & Spa – Naivasha,
Kenya.
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THE END
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