Gender-sensitive strategies for mitigation actions

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Transcript Gender-sensitive strategies for mitigation actions

Gender-sensitive
strategies
for mitigation
actions
Rose Mwebaza (PhD)
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Basic considerations
While there has already been some exploration of the links
between adaptation to climate change and gender equality,
the gender aspects of mitigation are still at an initial stage
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Basic considerations
• Certain areas in which mitigation
actions are being proposed
women have proven to be crucial
(reforestation, conservation of
forests, consumption and energy)
•
What has been lacking is
awareness, recognition and
acknowledgement of the role and
input that rural and urban women
from developed and developing
countries have had and are having
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Carbon capture, fixing or sequestration
• Management or
conservation of forests,
men and women often have
different productive and
reproductive roles with regard
to forest resource
management
•
Women’s groups have also
proven to be vital for the
conservation of forests all
around the world
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Forest+ REDD
• Men and women have different
roles with regard to forest
resource management. They
play different parts in planting,
protecting or caring for
seedlings and small trees, as
well as in planting and
maintaining homestead
woodlots and plantations on
public lands
• Women’s role in reforestation,
deforestation and aforestation
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Making REDD work for Gender Equality
• International REDD
negotiations and schemes must
ensure compliance with
international and national
commitments on gender
equality and equity, including
CEDAW
• Ensure full participation and
integration of women, from
local and indigenous
communities, in policy design
processes
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Making REDD work for Gender Equality
• Equitable access to, and
distribution of, the economic
benefits derived from forest
services provided to mitigate
climate change
• Promote equal access of women
to land ownership and other
resources
• Both women and men must be
trained in methods to increase
carbon sequestration through
forestry technologies, etc.
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Reducing emissions through clean
energy sources and technologies
• In developing countries,
especially in rural areas, there
is a direct connection between
energy supplies and gender
roles. Burning biomass for
household cooking, heating
and lighting represents a high
percentage of many countries’
overall energy use
• Biofuels, new technologies
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Consumption
Studies conducted by the OECD
gender has a huge influence on
sustainable consumption, partly due to
the differing consumption patterns of
men and women:
•In some OECD countries, women make over
80% of consumption decisions
•Women are more likely to be sustainable
consumers, e.g. they tend to buy eco-labelled
or organic food, have a higher propensity to
recycle and place more value on efficient
energy than men
•Women pay closer attention in their
purchases to ethical issues such as child
labour and fair trade
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
Consumption
• Campaigns and education
efforts directed at changing
consumer patterns and
incorporating principles of
sustainable consumption, as a
mitigation strategy to climate
change, must consider women
as one of the most important
target groups
• Additionally, women are still, in
many countries, responsible for
transmitting education and
environmental principles to their
children
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance
A CALL TO ACTION
The Global Gender and Climate Alliance