11_20 Moscow - Multi platform

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Transcript 11_20 Moscow - Multi platform

ICT Enhanced Knowledge Sharing:
Challenges and Opportunities for Broadcasters
Presentation by Abdul Waheed Khan
Assistant Director-General for Communication and Information,
UNESCO
On the occasion of the
10th Jubilee of the Eurasian Teleforum
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Social transformations
“Half a hectare of land
and one year of labour
were required to feed
one person in 1900;
whereas that same
half-hectare now feeds
10 persons on the
basis of just one and a
half days of labour”.
Agricultural Society
Machines to
multiply
muscle power
Industrial Society
Knowledge to
multiply
brain power
UNESCO Science Report
Knowledge Societies
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UNESCO’s Concept of Knowledge Societies
Knowledge Societies
Knowledge
Creation
Knowledge
Preservation
Knowledge
Dissemination
Knowledge
Utilization
Freedom
Inclusiveness
Diversity
Empowerment
Pluralism
Human Needs and Rights
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Technology Revolution
21st
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Transistor History I
Early computers, such as the
ENIAC, used vacuum tubes similar to light bulbs - to do
calculations and took several
people to operate.
Vacuum tubes were
replaced by transistors
invented by Shockley
Bardeen and Brattain at
Bell Labs.
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Transistor History II
The first working transistor
was shown off in 1947,
but was only revealed to
the public six months
later.
The first commercial product to
contain a transistor was the
Sonotone 1010 hearing aid,
released five years after the
transistor was invented.
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Transistor History III
The invention of the transistor
ushered in the development of the
integrated circuit,- the forerunner
of today's silicon chips. The first
demonstration was made by
Jack Kilby in 1958
In 1965 Intel co-founder Moore,
predicted that the number of
transistors on a chip would
double every year.
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Transistor History IV
The steady increase in power of
silicon chip ushered in a new era of
personal computing, with machines
such as the Apple 1 being built by
enthusiastic hobbyists.
Today's chips contain millions of
transistors and are used in
everything from mobile phones
and computers to cars and
planes.
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Divides
Access to
knowledge
Prosperity
Globalization
Inclusion
Limited access
to knowledge
Poverty
Marginalization
Exclusion
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Technological Trends
 Increased capacity and processing speed
 Reduced size and costs
 Versatile software tools for creating, create, edit and
remixing
 Reduced time to edit, compile, store and retrieve content
 More efficient content preservation, storage and reuse
 Easier information sourcing for programmes (online
sources)
 Increased multi-platform transmission and distribution
between locations, service providers and users
 Decrease in cost and increase of quality of consumer
technology devises (audio, photo, monitors and video)
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New Media and Traditionnel Broadcasters I
 Non-linear productions system (computer and software




based) with greater cost efficiency, rapidity and
distributed production potential
Local crews equipped with digital video (DV) equipment:
with greater cost effectiveness and rapid deployment
Computerized news rooms with increased efficiency
Non-destructive editing potentials with digital
technologies
Efficient digital retrieval and archival systems
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New Media and Traditionnel Broadcasters II
 Increased product marketing possibility (CD, DVD etc) with
minimal multiplying costs
 Increased audience participation in talk-back programmes,
e.g. through increased number of mobile phones
 Easier and cheaper access to international satellite uplinks
 Enhanced online presence of broadcasters on the Internet,
mobile phones, etc.
 Increased production outsourcing potential due to digital
technologies and independent production groups
 Visually improved programmes through use of computer
based animations
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Audience Context
Transformation of programme consumption:
 From stationary to online and mobile
 From media types to audience situation
X
X
X
Lean forward
Lean back
On the move
 Technology convergence accelerates transformation
of audience situations
 Broadcaster’s response: Multiplatform delivery
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New Consumption Patterns
Consumption: from ”real time” to ”my time”
Podcasting
My time access to
broadcast material
online
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User Generated Content
 Explosion of user-generated content
 Content creation outside of professional routines and practices
 Broadcasters increasingly encourage user generated content
(e.g.: BBC, CNN, Video Nation, Video Gag)
 Social spaces facilitate content creation (e.g.: YouTube, My
Space, Facebook)
 Motivating/enabling factors:
– Connecting with peers, achieving fame, and expressing oneself
– Improvement of consumer electronics
– Increased bandwidth to connect with broadcasters
 But: user-generated content is no substitute to professional
content
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Future of Professional Broadcasting
Need for reliable content keeps broadcaster indispensable:
 Professional approach to content creation
 Respect of editorial ethics and practices
 Need to assure credibility of information to ensure
institutional or commercial market share
 Motivation factors:
– Audience share
– User gratification
– Diversification of professional content
– Diversification of service
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Content Perspectives
 Knowledge creation and dissemination as potentially
powerful niche
 Areas of enhanced content creation:
– Education:
Distance education linking traditional broadcasting
(Radio/TV) and new technologies (handhelds/cell
phones)
– Science:
Dissemination of science content (e.g related to climate
change) for awareness raising
– Culture:
Use of traditional and new media to enhance dialogue
and mutual understanding (“Power of Peace Network”)
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Abdul Waheed Khan
[email protected]
www.unesco.org/webworld
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