Facts about Alcohol and Legal Highs

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Transcript Facts about Alcohol and Legal Highs

Alcohol is not a drug.
FALSE: Alcohol is a depressant drug. As a result it affects your body.
Initially, you may feel more energetic or cheerful because alcohol
depresses your inhibitions. However, that means you can also be less
able to control your emotions or reactions.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
Drinking water can lesson the effects of a hangover.
TRUE: While food and water may ease some of the symptoms, they
won't cure a hangover. Neither will drinking more alcohol. The best way
to avoid one is to moderate your drinking and have water between
alcoholic drinks. Remember that water won't make you any less drunk
or protect your liver.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
A cold shower, fresh air or hot coffee will sober someone up.
FALSE: You might feel less sleepy, but only time will get alcohol out of
your body. Depending on your weight, it takes about one hour to
process one unit of alcohol.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
Lining your stomach with a big meal before drink can help to
reduce the risk of getting drunk.
FALSE: Drinking on a full stomach before you go out will delay alcohol
getting into your system, not prevent it. A meal will only delay the rate of
alcohol absorption, but if you go on to drink heavily you will get drunk.
However, it's still best to eat a proper meal before a night out,
especially foods rich in carbohydrates and proteins.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
Your body develops a tolerance to alcohol, so you can safely
drink more.
FALSE: The more you drink the more damage your body will sustain
and the greater the risks become. Tolerance can actually be seen as a
warning sign that your body has started to be affected by alcohol.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
It is legal for a young person to drink alcohol.
TRUE: A young person can drink alcohol legally. However the Chief
Medical Officer recommends that no young person drinks alcohol
before the age of 15 (and ideally not until the age of 18).
It is against the law for a young person to purchase alcohol under the
age of 18 and to drink alcohol in certain places.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
People are more likely to take risks after drinking alcohol.
TRUE: Alcohol affects judgement so, after drinking alcohol, people tend
to have fewer inhibitions and this can lead to risky behaviour.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
All teenagers drink alcohol.
FALSE: You’re likely to be offered alcohol as a teenager, but whether
you choose to drink it or not is your choice. 26% of 15 year olds have
never tried alcohol. 50% haven’t tried it in the last month.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
Legal highs are safe.
FALSE: You can't know exactly what you're taking if you take a 'legal
high'. Just because they are legal to possess doesn't mean they are
safe.
Because legal highs are often new and their chemical make-up is
constantly changing, the risks are unpredictable and are often still
being assessed. Legal highs can carry serious health risks including
reduced inhibitions, drowsiness, paranoia, coma, and seizures.
If you combine alcohol with any substance that causes a 'high', you
increase the health risk.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
It is ok to say ‘no’ to alcohol. It is your choice.
If you do choose to drink alcohol make sure you and your
friends stay safe.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.
6 things to do if you do decide to drink
 Eat before you drink because alcohol will enter the bloodstream
more slowly through your stomach if there is food there to absorb it.
 Before you start drinking any alcohol at all, be clear how much you
want to drink and when you’re going to stop.
 Make sure you drink soft drinks in between alcoholic drinks – this will
stop you becoming too dehydrated.
 Try to have standard-sized drinks so you have a better
understanding of how many units of alcohol you are consuming.
 If you go out and drink, make sure you know how you’re going to get
home and always have some money put aside for a taxi in case you
need it.
 Always tell someone where you’re going if you’re going out and think
you’ll be drinking.
If you are concerned about a young person’s
alcohol or drug use call Compass on 08000 887248 for free
confidential help and support.