Submitting Samples to the National Plant Diagnostic Network

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Transcript Submitting Samples to the National Plant Diagnostic Network

Submitting Samples to the
National Plant Diagnostic
Network
Sentinel Plant Network
Module 3
Module Objectives
• Learn the 4 W’s of Sample Submission
– Why?
– What?
– When?
– Where?
• Learn how to package a sample
Why Submit?
• Protect botanical
collections and natural
areas
• Provides baseline data for
the occurrence of
common pests
• Report unusual or
suspect pests
What to Submit?
Types of Samples
– Plant diseases
• nematodes
–
–
–
–
Insects
Spiders
Mites
Unknown plant
problem
When to Submit?
• Potentially new pest or pathogen occurrence
that you don’t recognize appears in your garden.
• You think you have a common pest or pathogen
problem, but the damage is unusually high.
• You’re managing a pest problem and you’re
not comfortable with your pest or pathogen
identification.
Where to Submit?
• Sample Submission
– Digital images
– Physical samples
• NPDN Labs
– www.npdn.org/
Where to
Submit?
Links to all of the state labs can be found on the NPDN
homepage, www.npdn.org.
Key Questions
• Who is submitting the sample?
• What is the host(s) and did the damage vary by
host?
• Any recent changes to site-specific pesticide or
fertilizer treatments?
• When did you first notice the problem?
Packaging Your Sample
Sample Submission
• Include the
lab’s
sample
submission
form.
• Provide as
much
information
as you can.
Sample Submission —
Insects
Most insects can be
preserved in 70%
ethanol or rubbing
alcohol. Propylene
glycol or vinegar
can be used for
short-term shipping.
Sample Submission —
Insects
Small insects and
other arthropods
may be submitted
on the host.
Sample Submission —
Diseases
• Submit samples
showing moderate to
severe symptoms.
• Submit an entire plant
if possible.
• Do not send dead
plants.
• Do not add water to
your sample.
Sample Submission —
Diseases
• Plastic bag to
keep soil on
roots.
• Dry paper
towels to
protect leaves
from contact
with plastic bag.
Sample Submission —
Review
• Place in appropriate
container.
• Place double bagged
samples in a sturdy shipping
container.
• Place completed sample
submission form and
Sentinel Plant Network
form in the outer shipping
container.
• Ship samples via overnight
carrier.
• If a significant sample:
double bag and call your
diagnostic lab to inform the
diagnostician that the
sample is coming.
Packaging Mishaps
Insect parts — What is it?
Water may destroy sample and
sampling information!
More Packaging
Mishaps
Questions
For more information on the Sentinel Plant
Network visit
www.publicgardens.org/content/sentinel-plantnetwork
Or contact SPN manager Daniel Stern at
[email protected]
Author Credits
• Amanda Hodges, PhD, SPDN Associate
Director, NPDN Training and Education
Program Area Manager, University of Florida,
[email protected]
• Rachel L. McCarthy, MPS, NEPDN
Education and Training Coordinator, Cornell
University, [email protected]
Acknowledgements
Content has been adapted and revised from the
NPDN module entitled ‘Submitting Diagnostic
Samples’. This scripted presentation was originally
released in 2006, and updated by the NPDN
Training and Education Subcommittee in 2008.
Module authors included: Creswell, T., R. Cullen, L.
Buss, A. Hodges, C. Harmon, K. Wright, and T.
Ailshie.
Reviewer credits
• Caroline Lewis, Education Strategist and CEO
The CLEO Institute
• Emily Griswold, Assistant Director of
Horticulture, UC Davis Arboretum
• Lynnae Jess, Assistant Director, North Central
IPM Center
Date of Publication
• September 2011
The Sentinel Plant Network’s Mission
The Sentinel Plant Network contributes to plant
conservation by engaging public garden
professionals, volunteers and visitors in the
detection and diagnosis of high consequence pests
and pathogens.