Container Production Using Herbs Presentation

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Transcript Container Production Using Herbs Presentation

Container Production
Using Herbs
Prepared by:
L. Robert Barber, & Ilene Iriarte
For:
Guam Cooperative Extension Service & Guam Department of
Agriculture
Funding provided by:
United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources
Conservation Service, Western Region Sustainable Agriculture
Research and Education, Administration for Native Americans,, &
Sanctuary Incorporated
Container Production
• Low cost way to explore growing plants
like vegetables, herbs, ornamentals, &
fruits
• Wide variety of herbs, shrubs, vegetables,
& trees are grown in containers
• People with limited outdoor space can
plants
Advantages of Container
Gardening
• People with physical limitations can
garden without bending down if
containers are raised
• Bring the garden closer to home, grow
herbs close to the kitchen (on the patio)
• Utilizes space unsuited for field
production or when space is limited
• Can have high plant densities in small
areas
Pepper plant growing
on the patio
Disadvantages of Container
Gardening
• Heat & wind can dry the roots of
container plants
• Small containers need frequent watering
• Nutrients are rapidly depleted (No reserve
bank of soil)
• Plants easily become root-bound
• Containers are costly
• Containers blow over in high winds
Container Selection
• Factors that affect what container to use:
–
–
–
–
Cost
Design features that affect root growth
Availability
How the container suites the particular need
for the garden
– Durability
– Aesthetics
Home made concrete pots
Container Selection
• Size of the container depends on the final
size of the plant
• Many containers around the house can be
used as planting containers
• Make sure there are holes in the container,
if not drill holes at the bottom side that are
¼ inch in diameter
– Drainage is necessary to prevent waterlogged
soils
Container Selection
• Herbs have a larger root system than their top
growth, so having a container large enough is
important
– General Rule: Allow each herb a gallon of potting
mix. A 12-in pot contains about 3 ½ gallons of potting
media so it can hold 3 – 4 herb plants
– A 16-in pot contains about 5 ½ gallons of potting mix
so it can hold 5 – 6 herbs
• Any container that meets the above and
aesthetic requirements is fine
Potting Media
• Commercial soil mixes are well-aerated, welldrained, lightweight & are usually pathogen free
– Disadvantage: Very Expensive
• Garden soil mix with sand & compost, coconut
husks, or peat moss are low cost:
– Disadvantage: May have pathogens & can be heavy
• There are a number of soil or potting mixes are
ideal for container gardening or Compost
– Have soil test done to check pH
– Your soil mix should match your plant’s needs
Potting Transplants
• When potting transplants the top of the
root ball should be level or only
SLIGHTLY below the potting mix surface
– If you plant it deeper rotting can occur
• Be sure to break up any root binding
Container Care
• The most common problem with container
gardening is watering
– Too much can lead to root diseases, wilting,
stunted growth
– Too little can lead to wilting, stunted growth,
reduced flower quality
• Feel the potting mix 2-3 inches below
surface
– If it is still wet do not water
Container Care
• During dry season, if the plant is mature
you may need to water as often as every
day
– If media dries out may require soaking to
restore water absorption ability
• Harvesting herbs regularly keeps the
plants’ growth under control
– Encourages continuous production
– Do not allow flowers to develop
Herb Species
• Growing a variety of herbs will increase the
diversity of the grower’s production
• Herbs can be classified into 3 groups:
– Annuals:
• Basil & Cilantro
– Biennials:
• Parsley
– Perennials:
• Chives, Mint, Oregano, Thyme, Sage
– Shrub Type Perennials:
• Rosemary
Herbs
Main Use
Parts
Used
Leaves
Propagation Space
Seed
12”
Basil
Italian
Cilantro
Mexican
Chinese
Ground
Spice
Leaves
Seed
12”
Seed
Seed
12”
Baked potatoes,
Cream Soups,
Egg dishes
Leaves
Seed /
Division
8”
Coriander
Seed of Cilantro
Chives
Herbs
HARVESTING METHODS
Basil
Cilantro
Fresh markets: Cut stems before flower stalks appear
Dried Leaves: Best after flower stalks appear, before it
opens.
Harvest older outside leaves, plant will continue to
produce new foliage till it goes to seed
Coriander Harvest seed when entire plant is dried and crispy
Seed of
Cilantro
Undried seeds have a bitter taste
Chives
Cut leaves within 2” from the soil
Italian Basil
Cilantro & Coriander (Seeds)
Chives
Herbs
Main Use
Parts Used
Propagation Space
Parsley
Middle Eastern,
European,
American
Leaves
Seed
12”
Thyme
French, Italian,
Caribbean
Leaves
Seed/
Cuttings
12”
Sage
Used in many
cuisines
Leaves
Layering/
Division/
Cuttings
18”
Rosemary Mediterranean Leaves
Layering/
Cuttings
24”
Herbs
HARVESTING METHODS
Parsley
Thyme
Sage
Snip stalks close to ground, start with outside
stalks, new growth will be encouraged, stems
remain it will be less productive
Most fragrant on a dry day, just before plant
blooms, can cut back to 4” off ground
Flavor is best before flower blooms, cut back to
4” off ground
Rosemary Can be harvest throughout year, do not take
more than 20% at one time. Most potent before
flower blooms
Curly Leafed Parsley:
Mainly used as a garnish
Flat Leafed Parsley:
Mainly used for
culinary purposes
Thyme
Sage
Rosemary