Mgt 240 Lecture - University of Notre Dame

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Transcript Mgt 240 Lecture - University of Notre Dame

Mgt 240 Lecture
The Internet: Computing at ND
October 28, 2004
Exam One
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Grades will be posted on course web site
this afternoon
Range from 97.5 to 41.5
Median of 73
Average of 70
Exam One
Exam One Grade Distribution
100
93
Number of Students
90
80
70
55
60
50
40
31
37
33
30
20
10
10
0
85 and above
80 to 85
70 to 80
60 to 70
Grade
50 to 60
40 to 50
Current Course Grade Distribution
Mgt 240 Course Grade Distribution
60
Number of Students
50
48
49
39
40
38
30
26
20
20
19
9
10
11
5
0
A
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
Grade
C
C-
D
F
Exam One
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If you would like to see your exam, you
will need to come to my office
Extra office hours next week so that you
can come and look at your exam
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Tuesday 10-Noon
Wednesday 10-Noon
Thursday 10-Noon
Exam One
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Things to think about when assessing your exam
performance
 Did you attend all the lecture class sessions?
 Did you do the readings and practice answering the
reading questions as they were assigned?
 To do well on the exam, you needed to do both these
things
What to do to improve your course grade
 Do well on homeworks, cases
 Come to lecture and lab class sessions
 Do the assigned readings and tutorials
Attendance – Section 1
Mgt 240 Lecture Section 01 Attendance Trends
100% 93%
90%
78%
Percent in Class
80%
70%
67%
62%
60%
51%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
9/2/2004
9/9/2004
9/16/2004
9/23/2004
9/30/2004
10/7/2004
Class Session Date
.3 correlation between attendance and exam performance
7 point difference in the exam averages of students who attended 5 sessions versus 4
Attendance – Section 2
Mgt 240 Lecture Section 02 Attendance Trends
100%
90% 87%
Percent in Class
80%
74%
71%
70%
70%
60%
61%
55%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
9/2/2004
9/9/2004
9/16/2004
9/23/2004
9/30/2004
10/7/2004
Class Session Date
.33 correlation between attendance and exam performance
10 point difference in exam averages between students who attended all lecture classes
and students who attended 2 or less
What is the Internet?
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Global computer network
Ad hoc linkage of many networks that
adhere to basic standards
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TCP/IP
No single entity is in charge of the internet
Perpetually evolving
Started as a DOD project
How the Internet Works
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Internet Protocol (IP)
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Standard for assigning computer addresses
All computers connected to the internet have
an IP address
Transport Control Protocol
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Standard for controlling communications
between two computers
Routing Messages Over the Internet
Three Ways to Access the Internet
A Representative List of Internet
Service Providers
How We Use the Internet
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Use of internet constantly evolving
Some of the many uses:
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Sending email
Exchanging files or data
Making phone calls
Commerce
Others?
U.S. Internet Usage by Age, Gender,
Region, and Income
Summary of Internet Services
E-mail
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SMTP – simple mail transfer protocol
IMAP (internet message access protocol)
 Stores mail on server
 Allows use of server-based folders
 Can access mail from any computer that can access
server
POP (post office protocol)
 Stores mail on server only until you access it with an
email client
 Designed to download mail to your pc
 Folders on pc
E-mail at ND
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Server-based email: Webmail
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Access mail on the server
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Secure connection to server and user authentication
Folders
Address book
Filters
Directory service
Quota on mail server
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Soft quota of 50MB
Hard quota of 250MB
E-mail at ND
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PC-based email: Netscape, Eudora, Microsoft
Outlook or Outlook Express
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Obtaining an email client
E-mail client set up instructions
PC-based email clients allow you to
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Secure connection to the mail server and user authentication
Access your email on the server
Download your email to your PC
Organize your email into folders on your PC
Send, receive, categorize emails
The World Wide Web
An Internet service comprising tens of thousands of independently
owned computers that work together as one.
Based on standards that web servers and web browsers
understand:
 Hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP)
 Hypertext markup language (HTML)
 Uniform Resource Locator (URL)
 Standard for web addresses
 http – high level protocol used
 www – web server
 nd.edu – domain name
Sample HTML
URL Examples
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University of Notre Dame
The White House
WhiteHouse.com
U.S. Top-Level Domain Affiliations
.aero
Aviation
.biz
Business Organizations
.com
Commercial
.coop
Co-Operative Organizations
.edu
Educational
.gov
US Government
.info
Open TLD
.int
International Organizations
.mil
US Dept of Defense
.museum
Museums
.name
Personal
.net
Networks
.org
Organizations
Search Engine
Web Resources at ND
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ND Web Central
Using shared file space to publish a web
site
Web Resources at ND
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Creating a personal web page
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Create an html file named index.html
Designate either the n: or h: drive as your preferred
web site location
Place this file in your www folder on the drive you
have chosen
Now you should see the file when you type the url:
http://www.nd.edu/~yournetid
All other files that you link to your web page must
also be placed in this folder
Limiting access to Notre Dame community
File Transfer Protocol
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Standard for transferring files over the
internet
Can be used to access your H: or N: drive
from any computer as an alternative to
WebFile
Will be using ftp to upload web files to the
web server when working on your web
assignments and projects
There are a number of ways to use ftp
FTP Terminology
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Hosts and Clients
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The machine on which you start FTP becomes
the “client”
The machine you access with FTP becomes
the “host”
Also, sometimes the client is called the “local”
machine, and the host is called the “remote”
machine
FTP
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In order for a machine to be a host for you, that
machine must be set up to accept you as a client.
Typically, this is done by the system administrator.
Once this is done, you will be required to enter a login
and password so that the host machine recognizes you
as an approved client.
Uploading and Downloading
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When you transfer a file from the client machine to the host
machine, you are “uploading” the file.
When you transfer a file from the host machine to the client
machine, you are “downloading” the file.
Using FTP in Dreamweaver
Using FTP in Dreamweaver
FTP Using Your Browser
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Let’s say you’re sitting in an airport and you would like to be able to
work on some of your AFS files via the internet, but you are using a
machine that does not an FTP client program
This is no problem, because you can use a Netscape or Explorer
web browser as a client also
All you need to do is enter the FTP address of the host in the
‘Address’ box of your browser. This address is almost identical to the
address that you used with F-Secure, except you drop the ‘ s’ at the
beginning.
This is what your FTP address should look like:
ftp://[email protected]
FTP Using Your Browser
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Once you enter the FTP address, you will be asked to supply the
required password.
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You will then be able to see the folders of your AFS space within the
web browser.
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Downloading Files: When using the web-browser, performing file
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Uploading Files: However, you may upload a file by clicking on a file
transfer is not quite as easy as with F-Secure. You cannot download
a file by clicking and dragging a file from the host to the client.
Rather, you must first right -click on the file in the host directory and
then either open it or save it to a folder in your client directory.
in the client directory and dragging it to the host directory.
FTP Using F-Secure
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One of the easiest ways to use FTP is through a software package
called F-secure, which can be downloaded for free from the Notre
Dame OIT software package download page
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This page can be accessed through:
http://www.nd.edu/~ndoit/software/
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Click on ‘Software Downloads’
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Scroll down to ‘F-Secure for Windows’ and double click.
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Now follow the downloading instructions, and you are in business.
FTP Using F-Secure
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F-Secure is an excellent way to easily transfer
files between a host and client machine because
it provides a very intuitive interface. You can
transfer files between drives by click and drag.
When you first open F-Secure (open F-Secure
SSH File Transfer), you will see at the bottom of
the interface “Not Connected”. So now you’ve
got to connect to a host (remote) drive by
entering the host name or the IP address of the
host machine.
F-Secure: Entering the FTP
Address
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You need to know the FTP address of the host machine that you are
trying to access. For example: darwin.cc.nd.edu
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Click on “Quick Access”
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Enter darwin.cc.nd.edu for the Host Name/IP address
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Then type in your user name (NetID): for example, dballou
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Click ‘Connect.’
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Now a window will pop up requesting your password.
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Enter the correct AFS password, and then you will be connected.
F-Secure
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Now that you are connected to the host using F-Secure,
transferring files between the host and client is a snap
All you need to do to transfer a file is to select it—you
can select multiple files by holding down the ctrl key
while selecting—and drag it from one drive to the other
Or you can use the upload/download from the toolbar
Depending on the size of the file and the speed of your
internet connection, the transfer of the file can take
seconds or many minutes
F-Secure
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If you are using a dial-up modem, be very
careful of transferring huge data files--you’ll end
up waiting for quite a while! However, if you
have a high speed connection, even very large
files can be transferred relatively quickly.
You can also open a file to view by right clicking
on the file in the host directory and selecting
‘Open.’ You may also save and delete files
directly within F-Secure.