WHO-Technical Briefing Seminar | 16

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Transcript WHO-Technical Briefing Seminar | 16

WHO/UNICEF Technical Briefing Seminar
Geneva 16-20 November 2009.
WHO Collaboration with Countries on
Pharmaceutical Policies
Mrs. Helen Tata
Essential Medicines and
Pharmaceutical Policies
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WHO-Technical Briefing Seminar | 16 November 2009
Helen Tata
Summary
 WHO Presence in Region and Countries
 Collaboration structure
 Collaboration Framework
 Partnerships
– DFID/WHO/HAI-A Collaboration
– EC/ACP/WHO Partnership on Pharmaceutical Policies
– MeTA
 Outcome of Collaboration
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WHO-Technical Briefing Seminar | 16 November 2009
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193 Member States
6 Regional Offices
Regional Office AFRO
EURO
Regional Office EMRO
Regional Office WPRO
Regional Office
Regional Office SEARO
WHO HQ Geneva
Regional Office AMRO
(Source: http://www.who.int/about/regions/en/index.html)
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ion mechanisms for a sustainable collaboration with
AFRO
WHO
HSS
EMP
AMRO
EMRO
EURO
SEARO
WPRO
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Collaborating Centres for Medicines
 Over 30 collaborating centres in 21 countries
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A network of advisors for
pharmaceutical policies in countries
Medicines Advisers in over 40
countries (16 en Africa) and in
regional and sub-regional offices for:
UEMOA
Burundi
Cameroon
Central African Rep.
Chad
Congo
Democratic Rep. of the Congo
Ethiopia
Ghana
Kenya
Mali
Nigeria
Rwanda
Senegal
Uganda
United Rep. of Tanzania
Zambia
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EAC
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• Assessing needs and priorities.
• Planning, implementing, following up
and evaluating interventions.
• Coordination of partners.
Sub-Regional Collaboration
Potential Gains
 Exchange of information and experiences on
pharmaceutical policies
 Exchange of information on quality of medicines, prices and
on suppliers.
 Promote Transparency and Good Governance
 Stronger Negotiating Power.
 Alignment and Harmonization of legislations to improve
access to quality medicines.
 Harmonization of Essential Medicines Lists and Standard
Treatment Guidelines.
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Collaboration framework (1)
 WHO Medicines Strategy: 2004-07 et 2008-13
 WHO Medium Term Strategic Plan 2008-2013
– Strategic Objective 11 (SO-11)
– Results are measured against the goals of the organization
(OWERs 11.1, 11.2, 11.3)
 Recent Resolutions of the EB and World Health Assembly.
 Priorities set by the Director General.
 Regional Declarations and priorities identified by member states.
 Millennium Development Goals 2000-2015– Goal 8
 World Health Report on PHC 2008
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Collaboration framework (2)
 WMS 2004-2007- Countries at the core:
– Medicines Policy
– Access
– Quality and Safety
– Rational Use
 EC 8 results areas:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
National medicines policies
International trade agreements
Affordability and financing
Drug supply management
Norms and standards
Effective drug regulation
Rational use by health professionals and control of antimicrobial
resistance
– Rational drug use by consumers
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Bottom-up approach
Head Quarters
Keep contacts with partners for resources mobilization
and provision of expertise
WHO Regional Office
Support the country office and coordinate with HQ
WHO Country Office
Support the the MoH to idenfity needs and priorities,
to develop plans and to implement them
Ministry of Health
Identify needs and priorities
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Partnerships
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Relations with partners
HQ
WHO
Regional Offices
Operational
Partners
UN Agencies e.g.
UNICEF; NGOs
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Countries
Country Offices
Partners
Scientific Partners
Collaborating Centres;
Research Universities;
Professional
Associations (e.g.
FIP).
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Ministries of Health
Strategic Partners
World Bank; Donors
e.g. European
Union, DFID, Global
Fund, UNITAID
DFID Partnership Example
 WHO-HAI Africa Regional Collaboration for Action on
Essential Medicines in Africa 2002 – 2008: DFID funding
75% to WHO and 25% to HAI Africa
 The birth of WHO Medicines National Professional Officers
(NPO) in selected African countries.
 Intensified support in medicines work to 15 countries, RO
and HQ
 Capacity building for HAI Africa and its network
 Collaborative activities in 3 countries
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DFID/WHO/HAI-A Regional Collaboration
MoH Pharm Dept
Ghana, Kenya, Uganda
Collaboration
to improve policies
and practices for access
to medicines
WHO
Country Medicines
Adviser
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HAI Africa
The EC/ACP/WHO Partnership
 Focus on country and regional needs and priorities
 Assess, taking into account capacities and existing support,
and then plan interventions.
 Technical collaboration with countries:
– for influencing policies and advocacy;
– for strengthening pharmaceutical systems & improve access to
quality services;
– for building capacity
 Consolidate the work done, build on it and make it sustainable.
 Promote stable collaborations and seek synergies with other
key partners (UNITAID, TGF etc.)
 Promote Regional and Sub-Regional Collaboration.
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Medicines Transparency Alliance
(MeTA)
 A global multi-stakeholder alliance
–
–
–
–
DFID
WHO
World Bank
Private Sector (pharmaceutical Industry, generic and local
manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers etc.)
– Civil Society (public health, transparency and rights NGOs,
grassroots networks, patients/consumer organisations,
academia)
– Other bilateral institutions and partners
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MeTA (2)
Expected Outputs:
 Establishment of a multi stakeholders approach
 Collection, generation of data on availability, price, quality and
promotion of medicines
 Disclosure and dissemination of data
 Analysis & use of data to improve policies, advocacy & practices
 Strengthening country capacity to collect, analyse, disseminate and
use data on medicines
 Strengthening partnerships and promote a participatory approach to
policy development
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Collaboration Outcome:
The case of Tanzania

Tanzania Mainland and Zanzibar have both developed a National Medicines Policy and an implementation
plan (still draft for mainland).

The Tanzania patent law has been revised to allow the use of TRIPS flexibilities that could impact on
improving access to medicines.

Medicines prices and availability are currently regularly monitored in public and private sectors institutions. As
a result, advocacy work for more prices transparency has been carried out. In the Eastern Africa Community
countries, of which Tanzania is a member, similar findings have been recorded and duties and taxes on
medicines have been reduced by 10%.

A study on medicines coverage for ongoing health insurance programs has been carried out in 2008 with the
objectives of setting appropriate schemes for achieving universal medicine access.
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An in-depth assessment of procurement and supply systems has been carried out in 2007 and training in
drugs management has been provided in both Tanzania Mainland and Zanzibar.

Data on human resources for the pharmaceutical sector has been collected and report produced.
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The Tanzania Food and Drug Administration has been supported for the development of regulatory guidelines
such as for Good Manufacturing Practices, medicines donations, inspections, etc. and its staff trained. The
Zanzibar Drug Act was endorsed in 2006.
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Rational use of medicines has been promoted with the revision and dissemination of the Essential Medicines
List and Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) for Mainland in 2007. The STGs for Zanzibar have been
revised in 2009.
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Qualitative Analysis WHO/HAI-A collaboration
Results highlighted the following added value:
 Provided an Opportunity for synergies between partners
with different expertise and approaches.
 Mechanism to improve trust and mutual respect
between the Ministry of Health and Civil Society; and to
allow them to work as partners in the medicines policy
area.
 Dynamic process of consultations and exchange of
information and experiences to better respond to
country needs for the implementation of national
medicines policies.
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DFID Evaluation 2009
 Increased profile for essential medicines and evidence based
medicines policy across programmes and partners
 Increased capacity and recognition for the regulatory, procurement
and supply system
 Funding leveraged (domestic and external)
 Enhanced regional linkages and initiatives
 Improved co-ordination among government programmes,
development partners, civil society and others
 HAI Africa has convened and enabled a respected and credible
consumer voice in medicines policy
 Substantive results achieved in collaborative work – joint research,
policy and well co-ordinated advocacy
THANK YOU
FOR YOUR COLLABORATION
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