Conscious - Green Gold Gardens

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Transcript Conscious - Green Gold Gardens

Human Brain Faculties Presentation
Michael Clarke
Life Everliving
August 15, 2010
Introduction
This presentation will ‘model’ a brain, animating
the complexity of the brain, so that we can
support our argument that the coalescence of all
the human brain faculties that govern human
beings and human intelligence, evolves into
enlightenment from unconscious to
consciousness through equilibrium of physical,
mental, and spiritual development.
Universal Consciousness
Human Brain Faculties
Conception
Thesis (Mother -> 23 Chromosomes) + Antithesis (Father -> 23 Chromosomes) = Synthesis (Child – 46 Chromosomes – all
human history)
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Universal Consciousness
Conscious ?
(at conception or at birth)
Human Brain Faculties
Con·scious [kon-shuhs] –adjective
1. aware of one's own existence, sensations, thoughts, surroundings, etc.
2. fully aware of or sensitive to something (often fol. by of ): conscious of one's own faults; He wasn't conscious of the gossip about
his past.
3. having the mental faculties fully active: He was conscious during the operation.
4. known to oneself; felt: conscious guilt.
5. aware of what one is doing: a conscious liar.
6. aware of oneself; self-conscious.
7. deliberate; intentional: a conscious insult; a conscious effort.
8. acutely aware of or concerned about: money-conscious; a diet-conscious society.
9. Obsolete . inwardly sensible of wrongdoing.
–noun 10. the conscious, Psychoanalysis . the part of the mind comprising psychic material of which the individual is aware.
Consciousness can be defined as - • the self awareness, inner sensibility or cognizance of the processing of one's own existence • the aggregate, collective or Unified Field of the interplay of all of the energies which make up all life.
"Consciousness - The Self-Awareness of All Being" was written, published and © by Transpersonal LifeStreams®, Tasmania,
Australia.
The URL's of this page are http://www.anunda.com/consciousness.htm and http://www.lifestreams.com.au/consciousness.htm.
Origin:
1625–35; < L conscius sharing knowledge with, equiv. to con- con- + sci- (s. of scīre to know; see science) + -us -ous; cf. nice
—Synonyms
2. knowing, percipient. Conscious, aware, cognizant refer to an individual sense of recognition of something within or without
oneself. Conscious implies to be awake or awakened to an inner realization of a fact, a truth, a condition, etc.: to be conscious of
an extreme weariness. Aware lays the emphasis on sense perceptions insofar as they are the object of conscious recognition: He
was aware of the odor of tobacco. Cognizant lays the emphasis on an outer recognition more on the level of reason and
knowledge than on the sensory level alone: He was cognizant of their drawbacks.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2010
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Human Brain Faculties
Consciousness
Consciousness in medicine (e.g., anesthesiology) is assessed by observing a patient's alertness and responsiveness, and can
be seen as a continuum of states ranging from alert, oriented to time and place, and communicative, through disorientation,
then delirium, then loss of any meaningful communication, and ending with loss of movement in response to painful
stimulation.[5]
Consciousness in psychology and philosophy typically means something beyond what it means for anesthesiology, and may
be said in many contexts to imply four characteristics: subjectivity, change, continuity, and selectivity.[1][6] Philosopher Franz
Brentano has suggested intentionality or aboutness (that consciousness is about something). However, within the
philosophy of mind there is no consensus on whether intentionality is a requirement for consciousness. [7]
Consciousness is the subject of much research in philosophy of mind, psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science and
artificial intelligence. Issues of practical concern include how the presence of consciousness can be assessed in severely ill
or comatose people;[8] whether non-human consciousness exists and if so how it can be measured; at what point in fetal
development consciousness begins; and whether computers can achieve a conscious state.
Consciousness. (2011, February 2). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18:26, February 6, 2011, from
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Consciousness&oldid=411601743
Quantum theories
Other physical theories have gone beyond the neural and placed the natural locus of consciousness at a far more
fundamental level, in particular at the micro-physical level of quantum phenomena. According to such theories, the nature
and basis of consciousness can not be adequately understood within the framework of classical physics but must be sought
within the alternative picture of physical reality provided by quantum mechanics. The proponents of the quantum
consciousness approach regard the radically alternative and often counterintuitive nature of quantum physics as just what
is needed to overcome the supposed explanatory obstacles that confront more standard attempts to bridge the psychophysical gap.
Van Gulick, R. (2004, June 18). Consciousness. Retrieved December 31, 2007, from
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/consciousness/#9.5
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Human Brain Faculties
Consciousness
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Human Brain Faculties
Consciousness begins as soon as we start to learn and
consume everything that comes into our “sphere of life”.
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Human Brain Faculties
Know Thyself !
Who am I?
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Human Brain Faculties
Foundation of Philosophical thinking:
Many ancient nations celebrated mysteries, but those of Egypt were the earliest. In the words of Brown:
The mysteries of all the other nations were quite similar to those of Egypt, and were no doubt derived from them. (Robert
Brown, Jr., Stellar Theology and Masonic Astronomy, New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1882, p. 11.)
The sacerdotal caste of ancient Egypt were an admirable group of men, possessed of keen intellect, profound knowledge,
and high character. The Mystery Schools of Egypt were the world’s earliest universities. The wise men of ancient Greece
went to Egypt for their higher education. Among these men were Plato, Thales, Eudoxus, and Pythagoras. Plato studied in
the Nile Valley for thirteen years. The metaphysical doctrines now called Platonic were first taught in the sanctuaries of
Thebes, Memphis, and Heliopolis long before Plato was born. The literature of the Egyptian Mysteries is not extensive, but
there are some surviving fragments which we can study…(Jackson, 1985, p. 131-132)
Jackson, J. G. (1985). Christianity Before Christ. Austin, TX: American Atheist Press.
Our best sources of information about Socrates's (469-399 B.C.E.) philosophical views are the early dialogues of his student
Plato (427-347 BCE) , who attempted there to provide a faithful picture of the methods and teachings of the master.
(Although Socrates also appears as a character in the later dialogues of Plato, these writings more often express
philosophical positions Plato himself developed long after Socrates's death.) In the Socratic dialogues, his extended
conversations with students, statesmen, and friends invariably aim at understanding and achieving virtue {Gk. areth [aretê]}
through the careful application of a dialectical method that employs critical inquiry to undermine the plausibility of widelyheld doctrines. Destroying the illusion that we already comprehend the world perfectly and honestly accepting the fact of
our own ignorance, Socrates believed, are vital steps toward our acquisition of genuine knowledge, by discovering universal
definitions of the key concepts governing human life.
Kemerling, G. (1996-2006). Philosophy pages. Retrieved January 1, 2008, from
http://www.philosophypages.com/ph/socr.htm
Sphere of Knowledge, Sphere of Influence…etc.
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Human Brain Faculties
Physiology
male : female
1
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Human Brain Faculties
The human body is made of some 50 to 100 trillion cells, which form the basic units of life and combine to form more complex
tissues and organs. Inside each cell, genes comprise a “blueprint” for protein production that determines how the cell will
function. Genes also determine physical characteristics, or traits. The complete set of some 20,000 to 25,000 genes called the
genome. Only a tiny fraction of the total genome sets the human body apart from those of other animals.
https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/lan/en/overview.html
The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international scientific research project with a primary goal of determining the
sequence of chemical base pairs which make up DNA, and of identifying and mapping the approximately 20,000–25,000 genes
of the human genome from both a physical and functional standpoint.[1]
The project began in 1989[2] and was initially headed by Ari Patrinos, head of the Office of Biological and Environmental
Research in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. Francis Collins directed the National Institutes of Health National
Human Genome Research Institute efforts. A working draft of the genome was announced in 2000 and a complete one in 2003,
with further, more detailed analysis still being published. A parallel project was conducted outside of government by the Celera
Corporation, which was formally launched in 1998. Most of the government-sponsored sequencing was performed in
universities and research centers from the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, and China. The mapping
of human genes is an important step in the development of medicines and other aspects of health care.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Genome_Project
DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is a molecule made up of chemicals called bases (A, T, G, and C) arranged along two strands of
sugar-phosphates that wind together to form a double helix.
An organism's complete set of DNA is called a genome. The human genome contains some 3 billion base pairs, which code for
the approximately 30,000 genes that define a person's unique traits.
New scans of the human genome have revealed widespread signs of recent evolution by natural selection affecting a broad
range of characteristics from the ability to digest milk to skin color.
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Human Brain Faculties
Brain Benefits of Exercise
• Promotes brain cell repair by increasing neurochemical production
• Improves Memory
• Improves focus and attention span
• Enhances decision-making capabilities
• Accelerates growth of new cells and blood vessels
• And many, many, more benefits
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Human Brain Faculties
Phys·i·ol·o·gy
–noun 1.the branch of biology dealing with the functions and activities of living organisms and their parts, including all physical
and chemical processes. 2.the organic processes or functions in an organism or in any of its parts.
[Origin: 1555–65; < L physiologia < Gk physiología science of natural causes and phenomena. See physio-, -logy ]
physiology. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/physiology
gender gen·der (jěn'dər)
n.
The sex of an individual, male or female, based on reproductive anatomy.
Sexual identity, especially in relation to society or culture.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
male
/meɪl/ Show Spelled[meyl] Show IPA
–noun 1. a person bearing an X and Y chromosome pair in the cell nuclei and normally having a penis, scrotum, and testicles,
and developing hair on the face at adolescence; a boy or man.
2. an organism of the sex or sexual phase that normally produces a sperm cell or male gamete.
fe·male
/ˈfimeɪl/ Show Spelled[fee-meyl] Show IPA
–noun 1. a person bearing two X chromosomes in the cell nuclei and normally having a vagina, a uterus and ovaries, and
developing at puberty a relatively rounded body and enlarged breasts, and retaining a beardless face; a girl or woman.
2. an organism of the sex or sexual phase that normally produces egg cells.
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
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Human Brain Faculties
Physical
Physiology
100B Neurons
X
100K Neurons
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Human Brain Faculties
Neu·ron
n. Any of the impulse-conducting cells that constitute the brain, spinal column,
and nerves, consisting of a nucleated cell body with one or more dendrites and a
single axon. Also called nerve cell.
Humans create 1 Billion new cells every hour, regardless of age. The most
complex known object within the human domain. Neuron firing can be
monitored by tracking calcium dye injected into the brain.
Pre-frontal Lobe
Sensory Cortices:
Ventral Stream (competing sensory)
Motor Cortex
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Human Brain Faculties
Physical
Physiology
Matter
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
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Human Brain Faculties
The human body relies on a series of chemicals to carry out all of its essential functions. Neurotransmitters and
hormones are the chemicals which control every system and process within the body. Norepinephrine is both a
neurotransmitter and a hormone. As a result, its role within the body is essential to normal body and brain
function.
Read more: What Does Norepinephrine Do? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5548212_norepinephrinedo.html#ixzz0xOGRlM8z
Melanin
A provocative analysis is presented to address the material-spiritual connection between man and the universe. The
mechanisms involved in the physiological processing of melanin is proposed as the conduit to keep people in tune with the
cosmic elements that exist in the universe. The book concludes with ideas for prospective research related to melanin
functioning.
Moore, T. O. (1995). Material-Spiritual Connection. In (Ed.), The Science of Melanin: Dispelling The Myths (pp. 99-115).
Silver Spring, MD, USA : Beckham House Publishers, Inc..
Adrenaline
A hormone secreted by the adrenal glands that helps the body meet physical or emotional stress (see endocrine system).
adrenaline. (n.d.). The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. Retrieved December 18,
2007, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/adrenaline
Dopamine
A monoamine neurotransmitter that is formed during the synthesis of norepinephrine and is essential to the normal
functioning of the central nervous system. A reduction of dopamine in the brain is associated with the development of
Parkinson's disease. Chemical formula: C8H11NO2.
dopamine. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Science Dictionary. Retrieved December 18, 2007, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/dopamine
Endorphins
Serotonin
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Norepinephrine
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Physical
Physiology
Matter
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
Central
Nervous
System
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
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Human Brain Faculties
Endocrine Gland
n. Any of various glands producing hormonal secretions that pass directly
into the bloodstream. The endocrine glands include the thyroid, parathyroid,
anterior and posterior pituitary, pancreas, adrenals, pineal, and gonads.
Also called ductless gland.
endocrine gland. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English
Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/endocrine gland
Telemeres:
Left Pre-frontal Cortex
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Human Brain Faculties
Physical
Physiology
Matter
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
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Human Brain Faculties
Senses
n. Any of the faculties, as sight, hearing, smell, taste, or touch, by which humans
and animals perceive stimuli originating from outside or inside the body. To
perceive (something) by the senses; become aware of. To grasp the meaning of;
understand.
senses. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007,
from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/senses
I’ve taken the liberty to add “talking” as a sense in which we communicate from
internal to external.
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Human Brain Faculties
Psychology
Physical
Physiology
Matter
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
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Human Brain Faculties
Psychology:
–noun, 1.the science of the mind or of mental states and processes. 2.the science of
human and animal behavior. 3.the sum or characteristics of the mental states and
processes of a person or class of persons, or of the mental states and processes
involved in a field of activity: the psychology of a soldier; the psychology of politics.
4.mental ploys or strategy: He used psychology on his parents to get a larger
allowance.
[Origin: 1675–85; < NL psȳchologia. See psycho-, -logy ]
Psychology. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18,
2007, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Psychology
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Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Psychology
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
Physical
Physiology
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
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Human Brain Faculties
Ge·ne·al·o·gy [jee-nee-ol-uh-jee, -al-, jen-ee-]
noun, plural -gies.
1. a record or account of the ancestry and descent of a person, family, group, etc.
2. the study of family ancestries and histories.
3. descent from an original form or progenitor; lineage; ancestry.
4. Biology . a group of individuals or species having a common ancestry: The
various species of Darwin's finches form a closely knit genealogy.
Wis·dom
–noun 1.the quality or state of being wise; knowledge of what is true or right
coupled with just judgment as to action; sagacity, discernment, or insight.
2.scholarly knowledge or learning: the wisdom of the schools. 3.wise sayings or
teachings; precepts. 4.a wise act or saying. 5.(initial capital letter ) Douay Bible.
Wisdom of Solomon.
wisdom. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007,
from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wisdom
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Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Psychology
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
Physical
Physiology
Wisdom
Mind
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
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Human Brain Faculties
In·tel·lect
–noun 1.the power or faculty of the mind by which one knows or understands, as distinguished from
that by which one feels and that by which one wills; the understanding; the faculty of thinking and
acquiring knowledge. 2.capacity for thinking and acquiring knowledge, esp. of a high or complex order;
mental capacity. 3.a particular mind or intelligence, esp. of a high order. 4.a person possessing a great
capacity for thought and knowledge. 5.minds collectively, as of a number of persons or the persons
themselves.
intellect. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/intellect
mental. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Mental
The brain creates ‘mental maps’ of lifetime of objects and peoples encountered. We incorporate our
individual understanding of ourselves as we attempt to create a ‘mental feedback loop’.
Wis·dom
–noun 1.the quality or state of being wise; knowledge of what is true or right coupled with just
judgment as to action; sagacity, discernment, or insight. 2.scholarly knowledge or learning: the wisdom
of the schools. 3.wise sayings or teachings; precepts. 4.a wise act or saying. 5.(initial capital letter )
Douay Bible. Wisdom of Solomon.
wisdom. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wisdom
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
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Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
Psychology
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
Physical
Physiology
Wisdom
Mind
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
30
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
A study that attempts to discover the fundamental principles of the sciences, the arts, and the
world that the sciences and arts deal with; the word philosophy is from the Greek for “love of
wisdom.” Philosophy has many branches that explore principles of specific areas, such as
knowledge (epistemology), reasoning (logic), being in general (metaphysics), beauty
(aesthetics), and human conduct (ethics).
Different approaches to philosophy are also called philosophies. (See also epicureanism,
existentialism, idealism, materialism, nihilism, pragmatism, stoicism, and utilitarianism.)
[Chapter:] World Literature, Philosophy, and Religion
Any of the three branches, namely natural philosophy, moral philosophy, and metaphysical
philosophy, that are accepted as composing this study.
Philosophy. (n.d.). The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition.
Retrieved December 19, 2007, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Philosophy
Met·a·phys·i·cal
–adjective 1.pertaining to or of the nature of metaphysics. 2.Philosophy. a.concerned with
abstract thought or subjects, as existence, causality, or truth. b.concerned with first
principles and ultimate grounds, as being, time, or substance. 3.highly abstract, subtle, or
abstruse.
Metaphysical. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved December 18, 2007, from
Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Metaphysical
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Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
Psychology
Faith
Religion
Will
Life
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Wisdom
Mind
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Physical
Physiology
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
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Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Faith
-noun 1. a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny 2. complete
confidence in a person or plan etc; "he cherished the faith of a good woman"; “…relationship is based on
trust" 3. an institution to express belief in a divine power; 4. loyalty or allegiance to a cause or a person;
"keep the faith"; "they have faith with their ancestors"
faith. (n.d.). WordNet® 3.0. Retrieved December 19, 2007, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Faith
Re·li·gion
–noun 1.a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, esp. when considered as
the creation of a superhuman agency or agencies, usually involving devotional and ritual observances, and
often containing a moral code governing the conduct of human affairs.
religion. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Religion
Will
–noun 1.the faculty of conscious and especially of deliberate action; the power of control the mind has
over its own actions: the freedom of the will. 2.power of choosing one's own actions: to have a strong or a
weak will. 3.the act or process of using or asserting one's choice; volition: My hands are obedient to my will.
4.wish or desire: to submit against one's will.
will. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Will
Life
–noun 4.a corresponding state, existence, or principle of existence conceived of as belonging to
the soul: eternal life.
life. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/life
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Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
Psychology
Spiritual
Humanity
Divine
Soul
Faith
Religion
Will
Life
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Wisdom
Mind
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Physical
Physiology
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
34
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
Psychology
Spiritual
Humanity
Divine
Soul
Faith
Religion
Will
Life
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Wisdom
Mind
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Physical
Physiology
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
35
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Med·i·ta·tion
–noun 1.the act of meditating. 2.continued or extended thought; reflection; contemplation. 3.transcendental meditation.
4.devout religious contemplation or spiritual introspection.
[Origin: 1175–1225; < L meditātiōn- (s. of meditātiō) a thinking over (see meditate, -ion); r. ME meditacioun < AF < L, as
above ]
meditation. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/meditation
Man·tra
Hinduism A sacred verbal formula repeated in prayer, meditation, or incantation, such as an invocation of a god, a magic
spell, or a syllable or portion of scripture containing mystical potentialities.
mantra. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved January 05, 2008, from
Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Mantra
Prayer
–noun 1.a devout petition to God or an object of worship. 2.a spiritual communion with God or an object of worship, as in
supplication, thanksgiving, adoration, or confession. 3.the act or practice of praying to God or an object of worship.
prayer. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Prayer
kun·da·li·ni
[koon-dl-ee-nee]
-noun Hinduism . the vital force lying dormant within one until activated by the practice of yoga, which leads one toward
spiritual power and eventual salvation.
Origin:
Sanskrit kuṇḍalinī
kundalini. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved August 05, 2011, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/kundalini
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Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
Psychology
Spiritual
Humanity
Divine
Soul
Faith
Religion
Will
Life
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Wisdom
Mind
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Physical
Physiology
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
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Human Brain Faculties
Vis·u·al·ize
–verb (used without object) 1.to recall or form mental images or pictures. –verb (used with
object) 2.to make visual or visible. 3.to form a mental image of. 4.to make perceptible to
the mind or imagination.
visualization. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved January 05, 2008, from
Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/visualization
Sym·bol
(sĭm'bəl) Pronunciation Key
n. Something that represents something else by association, resemblance, or convention,
especially a material object used to represent something invisible. See Synonyms at sign.
A printed or written sign used to represent an operation, element, quantity, quality, or
relation, as in mathematics or music.
Psychology An object or image that an individual unconsciously uses to represent repressed
thoughts, Emotions, or impulse.
symbols. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition.
Retrieved January 05, 2008, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/symbols
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Human Brain Faculties
Philosophy
Spiritual
Humanity
Divine
Soul
Faith
Religion
Will
Life
C
Psychology
o
n
c
i
Mental
Reasoning
& Memory
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
Physical
Physiology
s
o
u
s
n
e
s
s
Wisdom
Mind
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Melanin
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
39
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Human Brain Faculties
Live in the present, the here and now.
Life is real and wisdom enlightens us.
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Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
Universal Consciousness
C
u
l
t
u
r
e
Philosophy
C
Psychology
Human Brain Faculties
Spiritual
Humanity
Divine
Soul
Faith
Religion
Will
Life
o
n
s
c
i
o
Mental
*Reasoning
& Memory
Thoughts,
Emotions,
Experiences
Physical
u
s
n
e
s
s
Wisdom
Mind
History,
Physics,
Chemistry
Knowledge
Creativity,
Art, Music,
Language
Matter
Central
Nervous
System
Body
Skin
Heart
Lungs
Liver
Kidneys
Endocrine
System
Hearing,
Seeing,
Smelling,
Tasting,
Touching,
Talking
Melanin
Physiology
100B Neurons Adrenaline
X
Dopamine
100K Neurons Endorphins
Serotonin
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Human Brain Faculties
Cultural Dictionary
culture definition
The sum of attitudes, customs, and beliefs that distinguishes one group of people
from another. Culture is transmitted, through language, material objects, ritual,
institutions, and art, from one generation to the next.
Note : Anthropologists consider that the requirements for culture (language use,
tool making, and conscious regulation of sex) are essential features that
distinguish humans from other animals. Note : Culture also refers to refined music,
art, and literature; one who is well versed in these subjects is considered
“cultured.”
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
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Human Brain Faculties
Universal Consciousness
I Am
Consciousness
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Universal Consciousness
I
UCI ICU
Human Brain Faculties
Universal Consciousness
A.H. Almaas (2006). Universal Consciousness. Retrieved December 30,
2007, from
http://www.ahalmaas.com/glossary/u/universal_consciousness.htm
The Creation of Humankind
And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed
into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.
(Genesis 2 v7)
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Conclusion
Human Brain Faculties
Based on the facts presented
we have no proof of and don’t
think it will ever be possible
for the capabilities of the
human brain faculties to be
duplicated in a machine.
Consciousness
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
46
Human Brain Faculties
Myth ‘Busters’
• How much is our brain used?
• 100% of our brain is used, we normally
don’t use more than 10% at any given time,
but that varies based on a variety of factors,
including, but not limited to, internal and
external conditions/stimulus.
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Human Brain Faculties
•
Myth ‘Busters’
The source of philosophical systems originate from other than ancient African Civilizations.
Civ·i·li·za·tion (sĭv'ə-lĭ-zā'shən) Pronunciation Key
An advanced state of intellectual, cultural, and material development in human society, marked by
progress in the arts and sciences, the extensive use of record-keeping, including writing, and the
appearance of complex political and social institutions.
civilization. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved
January 06, 2008, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/civilization
When we speak of the Nile Valley, of course we are talking about 4,100 miles of civilization, or the
beginning of the birth of what is today called civilization. I can go to one case of literature in
particular which will identify the Africans as the beginners of the civilization to which I refer. And
since I am not foreign to the works of Africans in Egypt, otherwise called Egyptians, I think that
should be satisfactory proof. This proof is housed in the London Museum that is holding artifacts of
Egypt. In that museum you will find a document called the Papyrus of Hunifer. At least you should find
it there. It was there when Sir E. A. Wallace Budge used it in his translation as part of the Egyptian
Book of the Dead and the Papyrus of Hunifer.
Ben-Jochannan, Y. (1986, March 6–8). The Nile Valley Civilization and the Spread of African Culture.
Retrieved January 5, 2008, from
http://www.nbufront.org/html/MastersMuseums/DocBen/SpreadOfAfricanCulture.html
“You cannot extrapolate from a ‘smaller’ people what a ‘larger’ people are about.” Ivan Van Sertima
(Professor of African Studies at Rutgers University )
Ancient African Civilizations = Ancient Egyptian = Ethiopian
Copyright 2007 - Michael Clarke
48
References
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Human Brain Faculties
1993). Genesis. In C. H. Felder (Ed.), The Original African Heritage Study Bible (10th ed., pp. 4).
Nashville, TN: The James C. Winston Publishing Company.
(2007). Neuroscience For Kids. Retrieved December 28, 2007, from
http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/tenper.html
A.H. Almaas (2006). Universal Consciousness. Retrieved December 30, 2007, from
http://www.ahalmaas.com/glossary/u/universal_consciousness.htm
Altmann, J. (2004). military Uses of Nanotechnologgy:Perspectives and Concerns, Security Dialogue,
35(1),61-79.
Jackson, J. G. (1985). Christianity Before Christ. Austin, TX: American Atheist Press.
Kimura, D. (1996). Understanding the Human Brain. Retrieved December 13, 2007, from
http://www.sfu.ca/~dkimura/articles/britan.htm
Moore, T. O. (1995). Material-Spiritual Connection. In (Ed.), The Science of Melanin: Dispelling The
Myths (pp. 99-115). Silver Spring, MD, USA : Beckham House Publishers, Inc..
Philips, C. (2007). Left Brain/Right Brain: Pathways to Reach Every Learner. Retrieved December 14,
2007, from http://content.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3629
Radford, B. (2007, July 21). The Ten-Percent Myth. Retrieved December 28, 2007, from
http://www.snopes.com/science/stats/10percent.asp
Searle, J. (1984). Minds, Brains and Science. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press.
Smithsonian Institution (2006, March 2006). Homo sapiens. Retrieved December 18, 2007, from
http://anthropology.si.edu/humanorigins/ha/sap.htm
Van Auken, J. (2006, October 12). Edgar Cayce on Consciousness The Research of John Van Auken.
Retrieved December 30, 2007, from http://near-death.com/experiences/cayce04.html
Van Gulick, R. (2004, June 18). Consciousness. Retrieved December 31, 2007, from
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/consciousness/#9.5
Wallis Budge, E. A. (1895). Introduction. In E. A. Wallis Budge (Ed.), The Egyptian Book of The Dead
(Dover ed., pp. ix). New York, NY, USA: Dover Publications, Inc..
Whatmore, R. W. (2005). Nanotechnologies - Should we be Worried. Retrieved December 14, 2000,
from htt://pages.unibas.ch/colbas/N10WHO05.pdf
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I Am
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Human Brain Faculties
I
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