Integrated Marketing Communications

Download Report

Transcript Integrated Marketing Communications

1
Overview of
Integrated Marketing
Communications
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
Chapter Objectives
After reading this chapter you should be able to:
1. Appreciate the practice of marketing
communications and recognize the marcom tools
used by practitioners.
2. Differentiate among the following terms: the
marketing mix, communications, marketing
communications, the promotional mix, and
integrated marketing communications.
3. Describe the philosophy and practice of integrated
marketing communications (IMC) and the five key
features of IMC.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
2
Chapter Objectives (cont’d)
4. Recognize the activities involved in developing an
integrated communications program.
5. Identify obstacles to implementing an IMC
program.
6. Understand and appreciate the components
contained in an integrative model of the marcom
decision-making process.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
3
Pepsi Loot and Foursquare
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
4
Examples of Successful Campaigns and
Understanding Consumer Behavior
• Means-End Chaining:
Attributes
Consequences
(the means)
Values
(the ends)
• Tropicana OJ Commercials:
1.
Drink
Tropicana OJ
2. Drink Enriched
Tropicana OJ
quiet
refreshment
added calcium/
refreshment
satisfaction/nutrition
satisfaction/reduce
osteoporosis
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
5
Marketing and the Marketing Concept
• Marketing (Kotler 1980): human activity directed
at satisfying needs and wants through
exchange processes.
• Is marketing = selling??
• The idea of the marketing concept is to adapt
the company’s offering to the needs and wants
of the customer.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
6
Exchange: An Important Part of Marketing
• For exchange to occur, there must be ....
1.
2.
3.
4.
Two parties and each party must ...
have something of value to the other party,
be capable of communication and delivery,
be free to accept/reject the offer, and there
must be
5. an agreement to terms.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
7
Communications and Marketing
Communications
• Communications: the process where individuals
share meaning and establish a commonness of
thought.
• Marketing Communications: the collection of all
elements of a firm’s marketing mix that facilitate
exchange by establishing shared meaning with the
firm’s customers.
• Marketing Communications -> B2B, B2C, non-profits
• Marketing Mix: specific collection of certain levels of
elements of a brand’s 4Ps – product, price, place and
promotion.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
8
Figure 1.1: Social Media Venn Diagram
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
9
Figure 1.2: Elements of Promotional Mix
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
10
Examples of the “Tools of Marcom”
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
11
Promotion Management and Objectives of
Promotion
• Promotion Management: coordination of
promotional mix elements in setting
objectives, establishing budgets, designing
programs, evaluating performance, and taking
corrective action.
• General Objectives of Promotion:
1. Inform
2. Persuade
3. Induce Action
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
12
Branding
Brand
A name, term, sign, symbol, or design intended to
identify the goods and services of one seller or groups
of sellers and differentiate them from those of
competition.
Brand equity
The goodwill that an established brand has built up
over its existence.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
13
Marketing Communications
at the Brand Level
A well-known and
respected brand is an
invaluable asset
The key for brand
communications is to
differentiate one
company’s offering
from another’s
A successful brand can
create barriers to entry
for competitors
Brand
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
14
Integrated Marketing Communications
Integrated Marketing Communications
(IMC)
The coordination of the promotional mix
elements with each other and with other
elements of the brand’s marketing mix such
that all elements speak with one voice.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
15
The Integration of Marketing Communications
• Why Not Always Integrated?
• Tradition of separate communication tools
• Influence of specialized outside suppliers
• Managerial parochialism
• Fear of budget cutbacks
• Loss of power and authority
• Resistance of outside suppliers to broadening their
functions
• Skeptics who consider IMC to be a fad
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
16
The Meaning of Synergy
• The payoff from IMC is that brand managers
achieve:
• The integration of multiple communication tools
and media yield more positive communication
results than the tools used individually
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
17
Five Key Features of IMC
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
18
IMC Feature #1: Start with Customer or
Prospect
Media-Neutral
Approach
Identify Marcom
Program Goals
Determine Best
Way to Allocate
Marketing Budget
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
19
IMC Feature #2: Use Any Form of Relevant
Contact
• An example of a
Touch Point, or
360° Marketing:
Hershey Foods
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
20
IMC Feature #3: Achieve Synergy
• Multiple messages must speak with a single
voice
• Takeaway:
• A brand’s positioning statement must:
• Present a clear idea of the brand in its target market’s
mind
• Consistently deliver the
same unified message
across all media channels
on all occasions.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
21
IMC Feature #4: Build Relationships
• Build relationships (e.g., Harley
Davidson) rather than engage in
flings
• Costs 5-10x more to acquire a new
customer than keep a current one
• Takeaway:
• Loyalty programs promote long-term
relationships between customers and
brands that lead to customer retention.
• Experiential marketing programs can
create brand experiences that make
positive and lasting impressions on
customers.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
22
IMC Feature #5: Affect Behavior
• Don’t lose focus of the
ultimate objective:
Affect Behavior
• IMC must do more
than just influence
brand awareness or
enhance consumer
attitudes – the
objective is to move
people to action.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
23
Changes in Marketing Communication
Practices
• Reduced dependence on mass media
advertising.
• Increased reliance on highly targeted
communication methods.
• Heightened demands on suppliers.
• Increased efforts to assess communications’
return on investment.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
24
Obstacles to Implementing IMC
• Few providers have the skills required to
execute.
• Mass media campaigns easier than directto-customer.
• The real challenge is to make sure that tools
are consistently executed.
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
25
SWOT Analysis
Internal
External
Strengths
Opportunities
Vulnerabilities
Weaknesses
Constraints
Threats
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
26
Figure 1.3: Making Brand-Level Marcom
Decisions and Achieving Desired Outcomes
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
27
Making Fundamental Marcom Decisions
Micromarketing: The customizing of products and communications to smaller
segments (e.g., toothpaste).
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
28
Target Market Selection Strategies
1. Undifferentiated Marketing
One Marketing
Mix
All Markets
2. Differentiated Marketing
Marketing Mix A
Segment A
Marketing Mix B
Segment B
3. Concentrated Marketing
One Marketing
Mix
Segment A
Segment B
Segment C
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
29
Marcom Implementation Decisions
• Mixing elements
• Creating messages
• Selecting media
• Establishing momentum
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
30
Marcom Outcomes
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
31
Program Evaluation
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
32
A Concluding Mantra: All Marketing
Communications Should be…
Directed to a Particular
Target Market
Clearly
Positioned
Created to Achieve a
Specific Objective
Undertaken to Accomplish the
Objective within the Budget Constraint
©2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
33