Summary/highlights of the partners` activities in a power point

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Transcript Summary/highlights of the partners` activities in a power point

Partner 1: Tyndall National Lab, Ireland (Tyndall)
Topics:
Nanoimprint lithography (using silicon stamps) for fabrication of
nanoscale polymer optical devices (gratings, waveguides, splitters,
interferometers)
Residual layer
RIE
Stamp
Polymer
Substrate
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
FIG.: Nanoimprint process: (a) sample and rigid stamp are heated to T>Tg, (b) stamp and sample are
pressed together, (c) imprinted sample after cool-down and separation, (d) residual layer removal by
Reactive Ion Etching (RIE).
Advantages:
•High resolution (~100 nm)
•Parallel processing of the polymer layers
Partner 2: European Lab for Non-linear Spectroscopy (LENS)
Topics:
•Random lasers : Explanation of
spectra, tuning and switching using
liquid crystals (infiltrating the random
sample by liquid crystals)
•Disorder and order in photonic
materials, light transport, Anderson
localization of light
•Liquid crystals as complex random
media (anisotropic multiple light
scattering  anisotropic diffusion)
•Tunable 3D photonic crystals
•Development of a controlled single
pore infiltration process for rewriteable photonic circuits
FIG.: Schematic model of the quasi-two
dimensional diffusion process leading to
directional and polarized random laser action
in a complex system of amplifying liquid
crystal droplets in a polymer. Both
polarization and threshold of the random
laser can be controlled electrically.
Partner 3: ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques
Topics:
• Evanescent wave sensing for safety
and biological applications
• Tailoring light emission in organic
LEDs
• Optical manipulation in the
nanoscale
• Modification of the dispersion of
metal nanoparticles through their
interaction with a metallic surface –
explanation of the effect
FIG.: (A-B) 2.4 μm×2.4 μm
images recorded simultaneously
above the fabricated sample. (A)
AFM topography, (B) ASNOM
image (illumination from the
right). (C-D) Comparison over a
unit cell of the theoretical nearfield intensity (C) and the
experimental data (D).
Partner 4: University of Exeter (UEX)
Topics:
• Plasmonics of metallic
nanostructures (both localized and
extended plasmon modes)
• Plasmons for sensing and imaging
(including biosensing and bioimaging)
1.0
Transmittance
• Interaction between molecules and
plasmons (including fluorescence
and energy transfer)
0.8
0.6
EBL
NSL
0.4
400
500
600
700
Wavelength (nm)
FIG: Top left – an SEM of silver nanoparticle array fabricated using nanosphere lithography (upper left
shows a region where the spheres remain) - light regions are metal, dark the substrate. Top right – an SEM
of a square array of particles made using e-beam lithography. Bottom, transmittance spectra of the two
samples. The dip in transmittance results from excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance –
note the sharper resonance for the e-beam fabricated sample.
Partner 5: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC)
Topics:
•Preparation and characterization
of high quality ZnO/PS composites
and ZnO inverted opals of
submicron unit cell size, by
metalorganic chemical vapor
deposition
•Band engineering in opals by
controlled infiltration with a high
index material
•Study of the spontaneous
emission spectra in 2D photonic
crystal microcavities by varying
the size and depth of the cavities
•Study of the magnetoopical
properties of Ni nanowire systems
FIG.1: Left (right) panel shows reflectance
collected in hexagonal (square) regions of a ZnO
inverted opal. Central panel shows the
corresponding photonic bands.
Fig. 2: Polar Kerr Spectra of Ni nanowires
embedded in an alumina matrix for two different
nanowires diameters (D) and Kerr rotation spectra
of a thick Ni film (for comparison)
Partner 8: Bilkent University (Bilkent)
Topics:
•Demonstration of negative EM wave
refraction by metallodielectric photonic
crystals for a wide incidence angles
regime.
•Fabrication and characterization of a lefthanded material at 100 GHz
•Development of optical GaN based
quantum modulators
•Fabrication and characterization of AlGaN
based avalanche photodiodes operating in
the solar-blind spectral region
FIG.: Electric field intensity at the
exit of the metallodielectric
photonic crystal.
a) for 9 GHz (positive refraction).
b) for 9.7 GHz (negative
refraction). Incidence angle is 25
degrees.
Partner 10: Koç University (KOÇ)
Topics:
•Demonstration of the ability of
the microspheres to be used
for filtering applications in
optical communication
systems
a = 530 mm
m = 3.5
0.06
150
Power Throughput ( mW)
•Demonstration of those
resonances using an optical
fiber half-coupler and a
distributed feedback laser
180
120
0.04
 = 0.05 nm
90
60
0.02
30
0
1302.2
Elastic Scattering Int. (a.u.)
•Study of the morphology
dependent resonances of
silicon microspheres
0
1302.4
1302.6
1302.8
1303
1303.2
Wavelength (nm)
FIG.: The experimental setup for the silicon
microsphere resonances demonstration (top)
and the elastic scattering intensity and power
transmission spectra from the microsphere
(bottom).
Partner 11: Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (UR-DE)
Topics:
•Theoretical analysis of the emission of
a dipole pumped by two counterpropagating laser beams and placed
inside a 1D photonic crystal.
Demonstration of the emission control
through control of the phase difference
of the beams
•Growth of AlN/GaN films by molecularorganic chemical vapor deposition
(MOCVD); demonstration of the nonlinear properties of those films (by 2nd
harmonic generation measurements)
•Development of a set-up for delay
time measurements of ps laser
pulses
FIG.: Top: Lateral section of the investigated
AlN/GaN sample. The three layers represent
the elementary cell of the DBR structure.
Bottom: Second harmonic signal versus the
incidence angle, for the AlN/GaN sample.
Both fundamental and generated beams are
p-polarized. The fundamental beam
wavelength is 1064 nm.
Partner 12: Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique
(LPN-CNRS)
Topics:
•Development of a soft UV assisted
nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL)
technique
•Application of the UV-NIL technique for
the fabrication of high aspect ratio
nanostructures (resolution ~100 nm,
etch depth ~1.5 μm)
FIG. 1: Dot array with 200nm
diameter before (a) and after (b)
lift-off of 20nm thick Nickel
Advantages of the UV-NIL techn.:
•Low cost, high flexibility
•Simple and fast
•Imprinting at ambient temperature and low
pressure
•Possibility for fine alignment
•Good process compatibility for bio applications
FIG. 2: SiO2 nano-pillars lattice
with 200nm diameter and 1.6
μm depth over a 200×200 μm2
Partner 13: Vilnius Pedagogical University (VPU)
Topics:
•Study of the temperature and field
dependence of the properties of
the disordered and the partially
ordered systems
•Study of the band-gap position of
the ordered systems as a function
of the dopant concentration
FIG. 1: SEM (bar corresponds to 200
nm) micrograph of Fe-doped silica films
on Si produced from FeCl3-precursor
and annealed in H2
4
1
2
3
3
R, arb.u.
•Fabrication and characterization of
disordered, partially ordered and
ordered systems doped with
transition metals (TM) and TM
compounds
2
1
0
0.45
0.50
0.55
0.60
mm
Aim: Development of tunable
systems
0.65
0.70
FIG. 2: Reflection spectra of pure (1) and ironporphyrin (Fe-TPPS)-doped (2,3) silica opal-like
structures at angle of incidence equal to 0o (1,2)
and 10o (3).
Partner 14: Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT)
Topics:
•Study of a photonic crystal (PC) slab
with ring-shaped holes (RPC);
demonstration of the increased band
gap reflectivity of this PC compared to
PCs with air holes
•Use of the RPC for the realization of
high-quality cavities (Q~1060) and
waveguides of very low group
velocities (~0.005c)
FIG. 1: Scanning electron micrograph of a
ring photonic crystal patterned into SOI
(silicon layer thickness: 240nm). The ring line
width is only 70nm
•Fabrication of opal structures by
vertical deposition on to Si templates
•Development of a model to estimate
the local quality of finite 3D PCs from
reflectance spectra
2µm
FIG. 2: Face-centered cubic (111) opal grown
from monodisperse silica spheres with diameter
980 nm by vertical deposition on patterned
silicon substrate
Partner 15: Institute of Solid State Physics of the Russian
Academy of Sciences (ISSP)
Topics:
ZnO nanocrystals of different
shape:
• Synthesis by the gas
transport method
8
5
10
4
1
3
0,1
0,01
8
100
7
6
7
100
Intensity, arb.units
• Examination of the PL
spectra: mechanisms of
generation, mode structure,
threshold powers of their UV
lasing
FIG. 1: Electron-microscope images of the
zinc oxide nanorods of different type
Intensity, arb.units
• Measurements of their
photoluminescence (PL)
spectra under optical
excitation
2
6
10
5
1
4
3
0,1
2
0,01
1
1
1E-3
1E-3
380
390
400
Wavelength,nm
410
420
375
380
385
390
395
400
405
Wavelength, nm
FIG. 2:PL spectra of the ZnO nanocrystals of the
above types at different intensity (kW/cm2) of the
exciting nitrogen laser: 1-70, 2-180, 3-600, 4- 2500, 58000, 6-22000, 7-33000 and 8- 70000.T=300K.
Partner 16: Universitaet Hamburg (UHamburg)
Topics:
• Synthesis of strongly
luminescent ZnSe, CdTe HgTe
and CdHgTe nanocrystals by a
wet-chemical based approach
• Demonstration of various
assembling methods for a
controlled preparation of
assemblies of semiconductor
and/or metal nanocrystals
FIG. 2: SEM images of Au/Pt 3D ordered hollow
spheres (left) and inverse macroporous opals
(right)
FIG. 1: Typical photoluminescence spectra
(normalized) of CdTe, CdHgTe and HgTe
nanocrystals. Top right: water soluble emitting
powders (ca. 200 mg) of CdTe NCs of 2 different
sizes under day light and under UV-lamp excitation.
True color image of different solutions of CdTe and
ZnSe NCs under UV-lamp excitation.
Partner 17: Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute of the Russian
Academy of Sciences (Ioffe-SP)
Topics:
•Study of the nonlinear diffraction and
the 2nd harmonic generation
enhancement in opal-Si photonic
crystals
•Study of the modification of the
spontaneous emission rate of Er ions
placed in 1D photonic crystals (PCs)
at the lower photonic band edge
•Demonstration of electroluminescent
three-dimensional PCs
•Demonstration of opal-AgI PCs
controlled using the superionic phase
transition of AgI
•Fabrication of polypyrrole nanowire
arrays
FIG. 1: Reflection
from the (111) surface
of the opal-AgI
composite: (1) AgI in
the semiconductor
phase, T=90±C; (2)
AgI in the superionic
phase, T=150±C.
FIG. 2: Intensity of
the SH wave
reflected from the
(111) face of the
opal-silicon photonic
crystal (filled circles),
compared with
fundamental
radiation reflection
spectrum (open
circles). Inset:
schematic of the
“elementary”
nonlinear source.
Partner 18: Institute of Molecular and Atomic Physics (IMAPh)
Topics:
•Demonstration of brightness
enhancement in displays using
the anisotropic scattering
properties of nanoporous
alumina
FIG. 1: Angular distribution of scattering from
nanoporous alumina for different angles of
incident light measured with respect to pore
axes.
•Demonstration of optically
nonlinear ZnSe/ZnS braggreflectors. The nonlinearity is
due to the resonant electronic
interband excitation of ZnSe
•Demonstration of strong
photoluminescence in CdSe
nanocrystals deposited on glass
FIG. 2: Microphotoluminescent images of some
area of a glass substrate with adsorbed Cd
based nanocrystals in the beginning (left) and in
the end of the illumination by 488 nm cw lasesr
light (6 mW/mm2)
s p
•Theoretical and experimental
study of the second and third
harmonic generation in onedimensional and twodimensional GaN photonic
crystal (PC) slabs
blu
eS
HG
z
kr (2 )
kr ( )
ki ( )
p
s


a
kr(3)
kr (2)
kr()
y -M
-X
k// ( )
z
r
ki()
y
k//()
x
a
-K

x
FIG. 1: Schematic representation of (a) the 1D PC,
(b) the 2D PC excited by the pump radiation.  and 
are the incident and azimuthal angles; k(), k(2),
and k(3) denoted the wavevectors of the pump
radiation, SH and TH reflected signals, respectively.
o Demonstration of ~104
enhancement of the second
harmonic signal due to the
PC; explanation of the
effect
1.3
-32
15
-34
2p
1.28
-36
10
a/2c
o Demonstration of
photoluminescence in the
GaN due to the third
harmonic signal

p
pum IR
near
p
pum IR
near
Topics:
blu
eS
HG
UV
THG
3-P
hot
on
PL
Partner 21: Universite Montpellier 2 (UM2)
-38
1.26
5p
-40
5
1.24
-42
2s
1.22
-44
-46
0
1.2
0.26
0.28
0.3
0.32
0.34
k// (2/a)
0.36
0.38
FIG. 2: Photonic band
structure of the 1D PC
superimposed on the grey
scaled map of the SHG
response of the slab. Solid
line: the photonic mode
dispersion curves at
fundamental frequency
plotted at twice of their inplane wave-vectors and
frequency. Dotted line: the
5p mode dispersion.
Partner 22: Kungliga Tekniska Hogskolan (KTH)
Topics:
•Study of filters with wide range
tunability, using one-dimensional
photonic crystals (PCs) of Si and
SiO2 layers, infiltrated with a liquid
crystal (LC)
Advantages:
Narrower bandwidth compared to
conventional waveguides with LC
core and SiO2 claddings
Top: Cross-section of the directional
coupler filter with the “full Bragg Reflection
Waveguide (BRW)” arm.
Bottom: Cross-section of the filter with the
“Liquid Crystal overlay BRW” arm.
Partner 24: Universita degli Studi di Pavia (UPavia)
Topics:
•Investigation of single-line defects in Si
membranes by angle resolved Reflectance and
Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) techniques;
modeling of the defect-mode dispersion
•Phase sensitive measurements on polystyrene
artificial opals of different structure parameters
•Enhanced third harmonic generation measured
in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) planar waveguides
as well as SOI photonic crystal (PhC) slabs
•Simultaneous visible second-harmonic (SH)
and ultraviolet third-harmonic (TH) fields
generated in a two-dimensional triangular
GaN/sapphire photonic crystal
FIG: Second harmonic (a) and Third
harmonic (b) reflected signals versus
azimuth, at 16° incidence, for the
GaN photonic crystal (full circles)
and for the unpatterned GaN layer
(open circles). Insets illustrate the
power dependence of the peak
signals.
Partner 26: University of Oxford (UOXF.DK)
Topics:
•3D Photonic Crystal device fabrication by holographic
lithography combined with scanning two-photon excitation
•Fabrication of sub-nm scale photonic devices through binding to
DNA self-assembled scaffolds (templates)
• Synthesis of 3D periodic DNA nanostructures
•Formation of chiral DNA nanotubes (<100 nm diameter, ~1 μm
length), candidates for optical wires based on near-field
interactions
•Synthesis of molecular motors able to move along DNA tracks
(to be exploited in the fabrication of self-organized molecular
devices)
Partner 27: Institutul National De Cercetare Dezvoltare Pentru
Fizica Laserilor, Plasmei Si Radiatiei (NILPRP)
Input
0 min
3 min
5 min
6 min
7 min
8 min
9 min
10 min
Topics:
•Study of spatial solitons in onedimensional waveguide arrays
with cubic nonlinearities;
waveguide arrays are generated
by fs laser pulses
•Study of the effects of χ(3)
nonlinearities in various
structures
FIG. 1: Dynamics of Soliton Wave guides induced
with fs laser beam in lithium niobate crystals
1 .0
D a t a : O U T RE D P C X Y _ F
M o d e l: G a u s s
y0
xc
w
A
0 .6
1 .0
D a ta : B G 1 0 P C X Y _ D
M o de l: S e c h2
= 0 . 0 0 17 4
= 0 . 9 8 08 6
-0 . 0 2 18 4
97 . 1 9 9 1 2
91 . 5 3 2 8 6
10 5 . 1 7 5 3 6
± 0. 0 0 8
± 0. 21 6 8 4
± 1. 01 7 4 8
± 1. 85 6 5 4
0 .4
0 .2
In te n s i ty (a .u .)
C hi ^ 2
R ^2
0 .8
In ten si ty (a .u .)
•Investigation of Planck spectra of
spherical microcavities; discrete
Planck spectra are calculated for
small cavities
0 .8
Ch i^2
R^2
=
=
0 .6
A
xo
wo
1 .0 0 7 3 1
1 0 9 .2 4 7 3
1 0 .3 3 9 0 3
0 .0 0 1 1 6
0 .9 7 8 3 9
± 0 .0 0 7 6 4
± 0 .0 6 9 1 6
± 0 .0 9 6 7 8
0 .4
0 .2
0 .0
0
50
1 00
15 0
y -a x is ( m m )
200
2 50
0 .0
0
50
100
150
200
250
y- a xis ( m m )
FIG. 2: The beam profile at the output face of the
crystal, for free (left) and guided (right) propagation
through the lithium niobate crystal
Partner 29: Ecole Normale Superieure Cachan (ENS-Cachan)
Topics:
Nanoimprint lithography (using silicon stamps) for fabrication of
nanoscale polymer optical devices (gratings, waveguides, splitters,
interferometers)
Residual layer
RIE
Stamp
Polymer
Substrate
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
FIG.: Nanoimprint process: (a) sample and rigid stamp are heated to T>Tg, (b) stamp and sample are
pressed together, (c) imprinted sample after cool-down and separation, (d) residual layer removal by
Reactive Ion Etching (RIE).
Advantages:
•High resolution (100 nm?)
•Parallel processing of the polymer layers
Partner 30: The Queen's University of Belfast (QUB)
Topics:
•Development of high resolution techniques for
the characterization of micromagnetic and
magnetooptical properties of materials (like near
field microscopy of 2nd harmonic generation)
• Studies of various types of linear and nonlinear
surface plasmon polariton crystals (fabrication &
characterization)
FIG. 1: Topography (left) and the
polarisation-dependent SHG
variations from the PZT thin film.
•Device of a procedure for the creation of selforganized templates used for the formation of
nanostructures; formation of ferromagnetic and
metallic nanostructures
•Study of the magnetooptical properties of
nanostructured metal films
•Theoretical study of the quantum nature of lightmolecule interactions (for quantum computing
applications
FIG. 2: The Au nanowire array
achieved after removing the
alumina template.
Partner 32: Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas
(FORTH)
Topics:
•Theoretical and experimental study of the
emission from a narrow photonic crystal
(PC) waveguide; demonstration of highly
directional emission for proper PC
terminations
•Study of the emission rate of dipoles in
PC membranes; examination of the
dependence of the emission rate on the
frequency and the position of the dipole
•Study of micrometer scale metamaterials
with negative effective permeability (μ) in
the THz range; examination of the
frequency limitations of this negative μ
•Study of the negative refraction and the
focusing properties of photonic crystals
FIG. 1: Intensity
distribution of
light exiting a
2D photonic
crystal
waveguide for
two different
structure
terminations.
FIG. 2: The magnetic field of a Gaussian
beam undergoing reflection and
refraction at the surface of a PC in the
negative refraction regime
Partner 33: Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der
Materie (FOM)
Topics:
•Development of an angle-resolved
transmission/reflection setup for
investigation of micrometer scale
photonic samples
•Development of a phase-sensitive, timeresolved near-field optical microscope
•Study of transmission through periodic
arrays of subwavelength holes in metallic
films; extraordinary transmission was
found; resonances of the individual holes
play and important role
•Experimental detemination of the band
structure in photonic crystal waveguides;
observation of ultraslow light in such
guides
FIG. 1: The normalized transmission for ypolarized light of periodic arrays of holes in
metallic films, for different aspect ratio of
the holes (hole area is constant). The
legends show the aspect ratios of the holes.
In the insets the used axes are displayed.
FIG. 2: Schematic representation of a
pulse tracking experiment on a photonic
crystal waveguide
Partner 34: Consorzio Ricerche Elaborazione
Commutazione Ottica Milano (CORECOM)
Topics:
•Characterization of active
optical planar waveguide
devices
•Theoretical analysis of nonlinear optical propagation in
slow wave structures made of
coupled resonators
FIG. 1: Examples of direct-coupled optical
resonator slow wave structures (SWS); (a):
direct coupled Fabry-Perot; (b): SWS direct
coupled microring SWS; (c): PBG-SWS.
•Characterization of Er-doped
polymeric waveguide amplifiers
•Production and characterization
of ordered nanostructured
porous aluminum oxide
FIG. 2: Samples of anodic aluminium porous
oxide obtained in phosphoric acid. (a): partial
ordering by two-steps anodization of an
aluminium foil 99,995%; (b): hexagonal 2D lattice,
obtained by pre-patterning of the aluminium foil,
using 60°-rotated gratings as molds;
Partner 35: Bergische Universitatet Wuppertal (BUW)
Normalized Absorbance or Intensity
1,2
Topics:
•Synthesis of dye-coated
semiconducting polymer
nanoparticles
•Study of excitation energy
transfer from semiconducting
polymer nanoparticles to
surface-bound fluorescent dyes
PF2/6
Rhodamine 6G
1,0
0,8
0,6
0,4
0,2
200
300
400
500
600
700
Wavelength (nm)
FIG. 1: Absorption (solid line) and emission
(dashed line) spectra of PF2/6 nanoparticle
dispersion and of Rhodamine 6G.
FIG. 2: Emission spectra of PF2/6
nanoparticle dispersions (dotted curves) and
of Rhodamine 6G-coated nanoparticle
dispersions with λex of 374 nm. The inset
shows the emission spectra (dashed curves)
of dye-coated nanoparticles excited at 527
nm into the absorption band of the dye
(wavelength region 550-700 nm).
Fluorescence intensity (a. u.)
1,0
0,8
0,6
540
560
580
600
620
640
660
0,4
0,2
420
490
560
Wavelength (nm)
630
700