Slide - Journal of Vision

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From: Crowding and eccentricity determine reading rate
Journal of Vision. 2007;7(2):20. doi:10.1167/7.2.20
Figure Legend:
Effects of eccentricity. Based on the data in Figure 12. (a) The maximum reading rate estimated by Chung et al. (1998)
from their two-line fit to the data at each vertical eccentricity (in lower visual field). This is a big effect; reading rate drops
sixfold from 0° to 20°. While there is no known reason for any of these graphs to be straight, the linear regression
lines do fit well enough for us to take their log-linear slope as a summary of the eccentricity dependence. The mean
slope of the regression lines in (a) is −0.04 decade/deg, with a standard deviation of 0.006. Note that, in the model (Eq.
3), reading rate r (character per second) is the product ρu, so log r = log ρ + log u and d⁢
log⁢
rdφ=d⁢
log⁢
ρdφ+d⁢
log⁢
udφ. Thus,
the
slopes
of
log
ρ
(panel
b)
and
log
u
(panel
c)
must
sum
to
the
slope
of
log
r
(panel
a).
(b)
The
rate
factor
ρ
at
each reserved.
Date of download: 4/11/2017
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eccentricity. The mean slope is −0.05 decade/deg. (c) The uncrowded span u = 1 + 2/b for large spacing (Eq. B8) at