measuring electrical components

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Transcript measuring electrical components

OBJECTIVES
After studying Chapter 13, the reader should be able to:
1. Describe the problems that can occur in electrical
circuits.
2. Test electrical circuits.
3. Explain what a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is
and how it can be used by the service technician.
4. Retrieve DTCs.
5. Perform the ASE tasks related to electronic
problem diagnosis and repair.
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ELECTRONIC TRANSMISSION DIAGNOSIS
• Electronic shift controls require the transmission
technician to learn additional diagnostic and test
procedures.
• When diagnosing an electronic transmission, it must
be determined if the cause is faulty electronic
controls, a hydraulic system problem, or a
mechanical system malfunction.
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ELECTRONIC TRANSMISSION DIAGNOSIS
FIGURE 13-1 A diagnostic procedure for an electronically controlled transmission.
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ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT PROBLEMS
• There are three common types of electrical
problems:
– Open Circuits
– High-resistance Circuits
– Low-resistance (short or ground).
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ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT PROBLEMS
FIGURE 13-2 An open circuit is a break in the circuit that will stop the current flow (a). Corroded or
loose connections will cause high resistance that will reduce the current flow (b). (Courtesy of Chrysler
Corporation)
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ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT PROBLEMS
FIGURE 13-3 A short circuit is a wire-to-wire connection that can reduce magnetic coil
strength or allow current to flow to the wrong circuit (a) or a short to ground. (b is courtesy of
Chrysler Corporation)
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ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT PROBLEMS
FIGURE 13-4 A ground or short-to-ground circuit occurs when damage to the insulation allows an
electrical path to the metal of the vehicle (a). It can occur at a wire or inside a component (b). (Courtesy of
Chrysler Corporation)
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
• In the past, technicians used a test light, jumper
wire, and analog volt-ohmmeter or multimeter (a
combination ammeter, ohmmeter, and voltmeter) for
troubleshooting automotive electrical problems.
• Today, the weathertight connectors make the use of
a jumper wire very difficult
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-5 A fused jumper wire can be used to bypass portions of a circuit to determine where
the problem is located (a). If the lights come on with the jumper wire installed, the problem is the
fuse, switch, or wires to the battery (b).
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-6 A self-powered test light includes a battery and can be used to check for continuity (a). A
nonpowered test light (b) can be used to determine if a point in a circuit has voltage (c).
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-6 (CONTINUED) A self-powered test light
includes a battery and can be used to check for
continuity (a). A nonpowered test light (b) can be used
to determine if a point in a circuit has voltage (c).
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-7 Analog (a) and digital (b) multimeters. Do not use analog meters when testing
electronic circuits unless instructed to do so. The bar graph and digital display are shown in
(c ).
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-7 (CONTINUED) Analog (a) and digital (b)
multimeters. Do not use analog meters when testing
electronic circuits unless instructed to do so. The bar graph
and digital display are shown in (c ).
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-8 Many electrical
components, like this TPS, use
weathertight connectors with latches to
keep contacts clean and tight.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
• Measuring Voltage
– A voltmeter is used to
measure circuit voltage and
voltage drop.
– Voltage is measured by
connecting the negative (-)
lead to ground and probing
various points along the
circuit with the positive (+)
lead
FIGURE 13-9 The positive (+) voltmeter lead is
connected to the positive (+) solenoid terminal, and the
negative (-) lead is connected to ground. With groundcontrolled solenoids, the negative (-) lead is connected
to the solenoid TCM terminal.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-10 Voltage is measured by
connecting one voltmeter lead (normally the
negative) to ground, and probing the wire
connections with the other lead. (Courtesy of
Chrysler Corporation)
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-11 This meter is connected to
measure the voltage drop across the resistor.
(Courtesy of Fluke Corporation; reproduced
with permission)
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TECH TIP
• Ohm’s law includes a formula that shows the relationship of
the three important electrical values.
FIGURE 13-12 This modernized version of Ohm’s law memory triangle shows the
relationship between volts, current (amps), and resistance.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
• Measuring Resistance
• Measuring Amperage
• Measuring Duty Cycle
FIGURE 13-13 A digital multimeter being used to
measure resistance. Be sure to turn off or
disconnect the electrical power to the circuit when
using ohmmeter functions. (Courtesy of Fluke
Corporation; reproduced with permission)
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-14 A digital multimeter is being
used to measure current flow. (Courtesy of
Fluke Corporation; reproduced with
permission)
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-15 Inductive ammeters can be clipped over a wire to measure the
current flow without disturbing the wire connections.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-16 The jaws of the amp probe are around the wire,
and the probe is connected to the DMM. The circuit is drawing
2.85 amps, which is read on the volts scale of the DMM.
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TECH TIP
FIGURE 13-17 This graph shows the current flow to a solenoid. The dip
near the center shows that the solenoid plunger has actually moved.
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TECH TIP
FIGURE 13-18 A blown fuse has been modified by
soldering a short wire to each test point (a). Replacing a
circuit fuse with a modified fuse provides an easy
location to check the circuit’s current flow (b). This
handy ammeter, called a Fuse Buddy, can be easily
inserted into the fuse box (c). Note the system fuse has
been inserted into the tool to protect the circuit.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-19 Measuring solenoid duty cycle
is similar to a solenoid voltage check. Note that
feed-controlled circuits should be read at +
duty cycle while ground-controlled circuits use
a – duty cycle.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
• Scan Tools
– Special tools to scan data
from the vehicle computers
have been developed by
most vehicle manufacturers.
FIGURE 13-20 Two generic scan tools designed to
work with most vehicles. The Mastertech (a) uses
adapters to connect to the diagnostic connector and an
application cartridge to provide data for a particular
vehicle. The Genisys scan tool (b) has software
cartridges for many vehicles. Note that the screen of (b)
is showing the engine, transmission input, and
transmission output rpm; transmission operating data
can also be shown (c). (a is courtesy of Vetronix; b and
c are courtesy of OTC)
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-21 This DLC (diagnostic link connector) is under the instrument panel (a).
Connecting a scan tool to the DLC allows it to display and operate vehicle functions (b).
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-22 The first letter of an OBD-II code identifies the function of the
fault code area; transmission faults will begin with P. The first digit indicates if
the DTC is generic or manufacturer specific. The second digit indicates the
power train system; a 7 or 8 would indicate a transmission fault. The last two
digits indicate the fault.
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
• Oscilloscopes
• Interpreting
Measurements
FIGURE 13-23 The scope is displaying a secondary
ignition pattern in which most spark plugs are firing at
about 10 kV; one is at 25 kV (a). A digitalstyle speed
sensor pattern is shown in b; note the gap indicating a
possible problem in the center of the pattern. (Courtesy
of Fluke Corporation; reproduced with permission)
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MEASURING ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
FIGURE 13-24 This transmission wire
diagram shows the wire colors and terminal
numbers and how the wires are connected.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
• A faulty electrical
component such as a
switch, relay, blower motor,
or clutch is usually repaired
by removing and replacing
(R&R) it with a new unit.
– To splice a wire, you should:
FIGURE 13-25 The No. 2 VSS and park/neutral
position switch on this transaxle can be replaced
rather easily.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-26 A terminal is usually pushed into a connector until it locks into place (a). A pick tool is
used to unlock the terminal for removal (b).
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-27 A wire stripping/crimping tool has an
area designed to crimp wire terminals. A cutting area is
used to cut insulation and pull it off the wire.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-28 A splice can be made quickly by crimping a wire connector to the two wires.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-29 A wire splice can be made by
sliding the bared ends of the wires together,
and then twisting them to hold them together.
This connection should be soldered for
security. (Courtesy of DaimlerChrysler
Corporation)
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-30 A wire connection is soldered together using rosincore solder.
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TECH TIP
FIGURE 13-31 (a) A repaired wire connection should be insulated by wrapping it tightly with tape or
using shrink tubing (b). The tubing will shrink tightly in place when heated using a hot air gun.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-32 A signal monitor has three LEDs
and wire connections for the transmission harness.
On a road test, the LEDs show the electrical
signals, and these should occur in the proper order.
(Courtesy of J. S.Popper Inc., www.jspopper.com)
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
• Recalibration
– A speedometer that is reading incorrectly can be
recalibrated in some vehicles.
– Recalibration is often necessary when a new TCM is
installed.
– The process must be performed exactly as directed by
the manufacturer.
– Adaptive Function Relearn
• Electronic Control System Cautions
• Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs)
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TECH TIP
• If it becomes necessary to
correct electronic
speedometer readings
when there is no
recalibration process built
into the vehicle’s operating
system, an aftermarket
device is available.
FIGURE 13-33 This recalibrator device can be
connected into the wire connections to the VSS. The
internal setting switches can be used to increase or
decrease the rpm signal to correct the speedometer
readings. (Courtesy of Autotrans)
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-34 Extreme care should be used when testing
components displaying the electrostatic discharge (ESD)
symbol. These components can be damaged by ESD.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-35 These DTCs are vehicle-model
specific. They indicate the nature of the faults
for a 42LE transmission. (Courtesy of Chrysler
Corporation)
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-36 This DRB II screen shows that no fault codes are stored in the TCM memory (a); it
would display a screen similar to b if there were fault codes. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
FIGURE 13-37 A visual inspection of the transmission electrical connector ensures that the terminals are
clean and in good shape as well as being completely engaged.
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ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM REPAIR
•
•
•
•
Signal Monitor
Forcing Shifts Electrically
Clutch Volume Index
EMI Electronic Problems
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
• After the nature of the problem has been
determined, the faulty circuit or components should
be checked to locate the exact cause.
• These are often fairly simple voltage, resistance, or
current flow checks.
• These checks can often be made with the
components mounted in their normal position.
• A breakout box or test box can be connected into
the circuit to allow the technician to check voltage or
resistance
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-38 This 100-pin breakout box can be
connected to a wiring harness to provide
convenient points to make electrical checks.
(Courtesy of SPX/O7C)
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-39 The external (a) and internal (b) wiring harnesses connect to the transmission electrical
components.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
• TCM Power Checks
– Battery
– To make a battery load test, you should:
•
•
•
•
•
•
TCC Checks
Solenoid Checks
Switch Checks
Speed Sensor Checks
Throttle Position Sensor Checks
Temperature Sensor Checks
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-40 TCM terminals 16 and 17 receive B +
when the transmission relay is energized. This also
sends B + to the solenoid and pressure switch
assembly.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-41 Ohmmeter A is connected to
check for a grounded circuit: it should read
infinite resistance. Ohmmeter B is measuring the
resistance of the coil; if the leads are reversed, it
will show a different resistance because of the
diode.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-42 Ohmmeter A is checking for a grounded solenoid coil; the reading should be infinite.
Ohmmeter B is measuring the coil resistance; t should be within the specifications for this solenoid (a).
Connecting a solenoid to a 12-V battery should cause it to operate (b). Make sure the battery is connected
using the correct polarity in case the solenoid has an internal diode.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-43 You should not be able to blow
through this solenoid if it is not activated (a). If it is
connected to a 12-V battery, it should make a
“click,” and you should be able to blow through it.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-44 A special tester being used to check a solenoid (a) and a pressure switch (b). The
switch should either open or close when air is supplied. The solenoid should allow or block an air
flow when activated.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-45 The five switches inside this MLP switch
complete a connection to ground in the various gear positions.
(Courtesy of DaimlerChrysler Corporation)
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-46 A single-wire VSS can be checked by connecting one ohmmeter lead to the output terminal and
the other lead to ground (a). Rotating the transmission output shaft should cause the ohmmeter to fluctuate from
zero to infinite ohms. A two-wire VSS is checked as shown in (b). Ohmmeter A is measuring the speed sensor
coil resistance; it should be within the specifications. Ohmmeter B is checking for a grounded coil; the reading
should be infinite. (a is courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-47 Switch and sensor operation can affect different phases of
transmission operation.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-48 An ohmmeter being used to check a
throttle position sensor. After disconnecting the 5-V
reference, a lead is connected to the two TPS terminals.
As the throttle is opened, the needle should deflect
between no resistance and high resistance.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-49 A TPS can be checked by connecting a DC voltmeter to the output
terminal and ground. The signal should increase as the throttle is opened and stay
within specifications.
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ELECTRONIC COMPONENT AND CIRCUIT
CHECKS
FIGURE 13-50 An ohmmeter connected to the two temperature sensor
terminals should show that resistance will vary with the temperature. This
sensor should have about 400 Ωat 70°C.
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ELECTRONIC REPAIR JOB COMPLETION
• Road test the vehicle after any repair to verify
proper operation.
• This test drive is similar to the diagnostic test drive.
• You should also check to verify that all of the old
DTCs were cleared and no new DTCs were set.
• Any problems found must be corrected before
returning the vehicle to the customer.
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SUMMARY
1. An understanding of electrical circuits is essential
for diagnosing and repairing electronic
transmissions.
2. The tools used to diagnose transmission electrical
failures include test lights, digital multimeters, scan
tools, oscilloscopes, and specially designed
testers.
3. When diagnosing an electrically controlled
automatic transmission, one of the first steps is to
determine if the trouble is mechanical, hydraulic, or
electrical.
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SUMMARY
4. Electrically controlled transmissions store a trouble
code if a problem is identified by the PCM.
5. Testing the sensors and actuators involves basic
electrical testing that can be done with a
multimeter.
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REVIEW QUESTIONS
1. The three major types of electrical problems are:
a. _________
b. _________
c. _________
2. Electrical problems can show up as either _________
problems or be _________.
3. When a circuit is open, no _________ will flow.
4. An increase in resistance will cause a _________ in current
flow.
5. Excess resistance problems are located by measuring the
_________ _________ at the various parts of the circuit.
6. When current bypasses the intended path, the problem is
known as a _________.
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REVIEW QUESTIONS
7. A short where a bare wire touches ground is commonly
called a _________ to _________.
8. The most practical meter for testing electrical components
is a _________ _________.
9. Voltage drop is the amount of _________ used to move
_________ through a load.
10. An _________ would be used to test a component that is
out of the circuit.
11. A technician would use a _________ _________ to read
the DTCs from an ECM.
12. An _________ would be an ideal tool to observe the
operations of a circuit with changing electrical values.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
REVIEW QUESTIONS
13. When making solder connections, always use _________-core solder.
14. The recommended three-step procedure for checking an electronically
controlled transmission is:
a. _________
b. _________
c. _________
15. The most probable causes of electrical problems are _________
_________ and _________ _________ that move.
16. Four simple rules to follow when testing or working on electronically
controlled transmissions are:
a. Make sure that the ignition is _________ before disconnecting or connecting
the ECM.
b. Make sure that the ignition is off before disconnecting or connecting any
_________ controlled components.
c. Never touch the _________ or _________ components without first
grounding yourself.
d. Use the proper_________ equipment.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
REVIEW QUESTIONS
17. The ECM must have a good _________ source
and a good _________ to operate properly.
18. The transmission solenoid must be tested both for
_________ and _________ operation.
19. Throttle position sensors are checked for a
_________ increase or decrease in meter reading
as the throttle is opened and closed.
20. The temperature sensor can be checked by
measuring the _________ at a known
temperature.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
1. Student A says that a short can occur if the internal
wires in a component make contact. Student B
says that a short causes a fuse to open, shutting
off the current flow. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
1. Student A says that a short can occur if the internal
wires in a component make contact. Student B
says that a short causes a fuse to open, shutting
off the current flow. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
2. Student A says that a check to determine if there is
voltage at a component can be made using a
voltmeter. Student B says that a test light is the
best way to measure voltage at a component. Who
is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
2. Student A says that a check to determine if there is
voltage at a component can be made using a
voltmeter. Student B says that a test light is the
best way to measure voltage at a component. Who
is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
3. When checking electronic transmission controls,
you should not use an analog voltmeter or ordinary
test light because they
a) are obsolete.
b) are slow and clumsy.
c) draw too much current and can change or damage the
circuit.
d) All of these
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
3. When checking electronic transmission controls,
you should not use an analog voltmeter or ordinary
test light because they
a) are obsolete.
b) are slow and clumsy.
c) draw too much current and can change or damage the
circuit.
d) All of these
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
4. Student A says that high resistance in a circuit can
be located with a voltmeter. Student B says that
excessive resistance can cause a circuit to work
improperly. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
4. Student A says that high resistance in a circuit can
be located with a voltmeter. Student B says that
excessive resistance can cause a circuit to work
improperly. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
5. When checking electronic transmission controls,
you should use a digital meter that has at least
a)
b)
c)
d)
100 ohms of resistance.
10 M ohms of internal resistance.
10 M ohms of external resistance.
Any of the above
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
5. When checking electronic transmission controls,
you should use a digital meter that has at least
a)
b)
c)
d)
100 ohms of resistance.
10 M ohms of internal resistance.
10 M ohms of external resistance.
Any of the above
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
6. Student A says that the only difference between an
analog meter and a digital meter is the readout.
Student B says that an analog meter could
damage an electronic circuit. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
6. Student A says that the only difference between an
analog meter and a digital meter is the readout.
Student B says that an analog meter could
damage an electronic circuit. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
7. Student A says that it is not a good practice to
pierce wire insulation during testing. Student B
says that if a wire is pierced during testing, it
should be sealed to prevent corrosion problems.
Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
7. Student A says that it is not a good practice to
pierce wire insulation during testing. Student B
says that if a wire is pierced during testing, it
should be sealed to prevent corrosion problems.
Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
8. Student A says that a voltmeter is used to check
for unwanted resistance in an operational circuit.
Student B says that an ohmmeter is used to check
resistance in an operational circuit. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
8. Student A says that a voltmeter is used to check
for unwanted resistance in an operational circuit.
Student B says that an ohmmeter is used to check
resistance in an operational circuit. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
9. Student A says that a scan tool can be used in
place of a voltmeter. Student B says that a scan
tool is used to communicate with the vehicle’s
ECM. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
9. Student A says that a scan tool can be used in
place of a voltmeter. Student B says that a scan
tool is used to communicate with the vehicle’s
ECM. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
10. Student A says that during a road test if the
electronic controls are disabled and the problem
does not change, the problem is not the electronic
controls. Student B says that the solenoids can be
operated by a special tool to check their operation
during a road test. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
10. Student A says that during a road test if the
electronic controls are disabled and the problem
does not change, the problem is not the electronic
controls. Student B says that the solenoids can be
operated by a special tool to check their operation
during a road test. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
11. Student A says that all electrical problems will set a
code. Student B says that when the trouble codes
are cleared, the problem is repaired. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
11. Student A says that all electrical problems will set a
code. Student B says that when the trouble codes
are cleared, the problem is repaired. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
12. A common problem with electronically controlled
transmissions is a bad
a)
b)
c)
d)
electronic control unit.
throttle position sensor.
vehicle speed sensor.
electrical connection.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
12. A common problem with electronically controlled
transmissions is a bad
a)
b)
c)
d)
electronic control unit.
throttle position sensor.
vehicle speed sensor.
electrical connection.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
13. Student A says that you can ruin an electronic
control unit by touching its terminals with your
finger. Student B says that you can ruin a solenoid
by connecting it to a battery backward. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
13. Student A says that you can ruin an electronic
control unit by touching its terminals with your
finger. Student B says that you can ruin a solenoid
by connecting it to a battery backward. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
14. When testing a pressure switch, it should show
a)
b)
c)
d)
an open circuit without pressure at the switch.
a complete circuit with pressure at the switch.
a complete circuit without pressure at the switch.
All of the above, depending on the switch
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
14. When testing a pressure switch, it should show
a)
b)
c)
d)
an open circuit without pressure at the switch.
a complete circuit with pressure at the switch.
a complete circuit without pressure at the switch.
All of the above, depending on the switch
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
15. Student A says that the voltage to the ECM is not
as important as the voltage to the output solenoid.
Student B says that the ECM must have a good
ground connection. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
15. Student A says that the voltage to the ECM is not
as important as the voltage to the output solenoid.
Student B says that the ECM must have a good
ground connection. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
16. Student A says that torque converter clutch
operation can be easily checked on a road test by
lightly stepping on the brake pedal and watching
the tachometer for a change in speed. Student B
says that the torque converter clutch can be tested
using a scan tool to operate the circuit. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
16. Student A says that torque converter clutch
operation can be easily checked on a road test by
lightly stepping on the brake pedal and watching
the tachometer for a change in speed. Student B
says that the torque converter clutch can be tested
using a scan tool to operate the circuit. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
17. Student A says that a solenoid can be tested by
checking the current flow. Student B says that a
solenoid can be tested using an ohmmeter. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
17. Student A says that a solenoid can be tested by
checking the current flow. Student B says that a
solenoid can be tested using an ohmmeter. Who is
correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
18. When testing a solenoid with an ohmmeter,
reversing the test leads will check the
a)
b)
c)
d)
transistor.
triode.
diode.
winding.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
18. When testing a solenoid with an ohmmeter,
reversing the test leads will check the
a)
b)
c)
d)
transistor.
triode.
diode.
winding.
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
19. Student A says that all transmission pressure
switches are the same. Student B says that
transmission pressure switches can be either
normally open or normally closed. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
19. Student A says that all transmission pressure
switches are the same. Student B says that
transmission pressure switches can be either
normally open or normally closed. Who is correct?
a)
b)
c)
d)
Student A
Student B
Both A and B
Neither A nor B
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
20. When electrical or electronic repairs are completed
the vehicle should be
a)
b)
c)
d)
taken for a complete test drive.
returned to the customer.
held for several days to confirm the repair.
All of the above
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
CHAPTER QUIZ
20. When electrical or electronic repairs are completed
the vehicle should be
a)
b)
c)
d)
taken for a complete test drive.
returned to the customer.
held for several days to confirm the repair.
All of the above
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition
By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood
© 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458