Choosing Species to Manage in the US Caribbean

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Transcript Choosing Species to Manage in the US Caribbean

Development of
Island-Based FMPs
Caribbean Fishery Management Council
152nd Meeting 21-22 April 2015
Divi Carina Hotel, St. Croix, USVI
Why an Island-Based FMP?
• Manage the specific fisheries of each Island
based on the species targeted, gears used,
available markets, economies, fisheries, and
social and cultural idiosyncrasies.
Actions to Date
• CFMC Agenda Item in Meetings: 143rd -152nd
• Scoping Meetings: July 2012; July-August 2013;
April 7-14 2014 (reports to 147th and 149th CFMC
meetings)
• SSC Recommendations to CFMC (November
2013 to present)
• Ad hoc Committee established
Actions to Date -Continuation
•
•
•
•
APs Recommendations to CFMC (August 2013)
District Advisory Panels (DAPs) established
1st Meeting DAPs (March 2015)
Topic of discussion: species selection action
and alternatives
What is being discussed?
• Developing criteria for objectively identifying
species in need of management in the US
Caribbean
• The criteria will be used separately for each
Island FMP:
– Puerto Rico FMP
– St. Thomas/St. John FMP
– St. Croix FMP
Action and Alternatives
• One Action and 3 Alternatives have been
considered.
• These were taken to the DAPs and the SSC
Action 1. Determine species to be
included for management in the FMP.
• Alternative 1. No action. All historically
managed species within the FMPs.
– Spiny Lobster FMU = 1 species
– Reef Fish FMP = 81 species + 58 aquarium trade
– Queen Conch FMP = 1 species
– Coral FMP = 94 species or species groups +
63 aquarium trade invertebrates
Action 1. Determine species to be
included for management in the FMP.
• Alternative 2. Identify species to be managed in
EEZ waters using all or some of the criteria
listed below.
–
–
–
–
Criterion A. Species occurrence in state waters.
Criterion B. Status of the stock.
Criterion C. Species as a component of the catch.
Criterion D. Ecologically essential species.
Action 1. Determine species to be
included for management in the FMP.
• Alternative 3. Identify species to be managed in
EEZ waters using an integrated attributes
analysis.
Table 1. Example of the attribute-based selection table that would be used to
score all the species. Scoring will be conducted by an expert panel and the
resultant average score compared against a threshold selected by the Council.
Species whose average score is above that threshold will be included for federal
management in St. Croix EEZ waters.
Species/
Species
Complex
Species 1
Species 2
Species 3
Species 4
Biology
Habitat
Economic Target
Ecological
Bycatch
Score Result
Specificity Importance Species
Importance
Species is
out of the
FMP
Species without
reported
landings are
out
If most of the
occurrence is in
state waters,
the species is
out
Species is
in the FMP
Landings
are
available
State vs.
Federal
Protected
or
Overfished
If currently
listed as
overfished, the
species is in
Landings
Threshold
If landing
threshold met,
the species is in
Action 1 Alternative 3
(Stepwise Approach)
Species that don’t meet the criteria
above to be IN or OUT proceed for
consideration to the table below
IN - Species in FMP
Species
species X
Biology
Habitat
Specificity
Economic
Importance
Target
Species
Bycatch
Ecological
Importance
Score
Outcome
OUT - Species not in FMP
Value of reported landings in dollars
700,000
600,000
500,000
400,000
300,000
200,000
100,000
0
GRUNT, WHITE
SNAPPER, YELLOWTAIL
SNAPPER, GRAY
SNAPPER, MUTTON
ANGELFISH, FRENCH
ANGELFISH, GRAY
SURGEON, OCEAN
SNAPPER, QUEEN
JACK, BAR
TANG, BLUE
SNAPPER, GRAY
SNAPPER, MUTTON
SNAPPER, QUEEN
SURGEON, OCEAN
SNAPPER, MAHOGANY
TUNA, YELLOWFIN
JACK, BAR
GRUNT, BLUESTRIPED
CONEY
SNAPPER, SILK
SCHOOLMASTER
MACKEREL, KING
TUNNY, LITTLE
BALLYHOO
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN
PARROTFISH, REDBAND
PARROTFISH, REDTAIL
HIND, RED
PARROTFISH, REDFIN
TANG, BLUE
St. Croix landings by mean value (2012-13)
SNAPPER, YELLOWTAIL
GRUNT, WHITE
GRUNT, BLUESTRIPED
CONEY
BALLYHOO
SNAPPER, SILK
SCHOOLMASTER
PARROTFISH, REDBAND
PARROTFISH, REDTAIL
MACKEREL, KING
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN
PARROTFISH, REDFIN
TUNNY, LITTLE
PARROTFISH, QUEEN
PARROTFISH, QUEEN
WAHOO
TRIGGERFISH, QUEEN
PARROTFISH, PRINCESS
PARROTFISH, PRINCESS
TRIGGERFISH, QUEEN
CONCH, QUEEN
DOLPHIN
PARROTFISH,…
HIND, RED
WAHOO
PARROTFISH,…
CONCH, QUEEN
DOLPHIN
LOBSTERS, SPINY
80,000
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
0
LOBSTERS, SPINY
Reported landings in pounds
St. Croix commercial landings
St. Croix mean landings (2012-13)
U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Fisheries | Page 12
St. Croix commercial landings
species
LOBSTERS, SPINY
PARROTFISH, STOPLIGHT
DOLPHIN
CONCH, QUEEN
TRIGGERFISH, QUEEN
PARROTFISH, PRINCESS
WAHOO
PARROTFISH, QUEEN
PARROTFISH, REDFIN
HIND, RED
PARROTFISH, REDTAIL
PARROTFISH, REDBAND
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN
BALLYHOO
TUNNY, LITTLE
MACKEREL, KING
SCHOOLMASTER
SNAPPER, SILK
CONEY
GRUNT, BLUESTRIPED
JACK, BAR
TANG, BLUE
GRUNT, WHITE
SNAPPER, YELLOWTAIL
SNAPPER, GRAY
SNAPPER, MUTTON
ANGELFISH, FRENCH
ANGELFISH, GRAY
SURGEON, OCEAN
SNAPPER, QUEEN
2012 landings2013 landings mean landings
86,947
59,398
73,173
41,869
33,773
37,821
34,832
35,566
35,199
36,771
21,431
29,101
22,262
13,646
17,954
18,140
15,265
16,702
8,678
24,413
16,545
17,475
14,958
16,217
15,331
16,264
15,798
17,225
13,327
15,276
12,684
14,176
13,430
13,264
12,964
13,114
11,508
14,542
13,025
10,017
14,656
12,336
5,925
18,249
12,087
3,944
18,842
11,393
13,012
8,619
10,816
7,969
12,944
10,456
10,955
9,570
10,262
11,043
8,915
9,979
6,359
13,189
9,774
11,390
8,135
9,763
10,696
7,181
8,938
9,400
7,497
8,449
7,681
6,580
7,130
8,193
5,827
7,010
5,682
4,551
5,117
6,151
2,377
4,264
4,984
2,620
3,802
3,865
3,410
3,638
species
LOBSTERS, SPINY
DOLPHIN
CONCH, QUEEN
PARROTFISH, STOPLIGHT
WAHOO
HIND, RED
TRIGGERFISH, QUEEN
PARROTFISH, PRINCESS
PARROTFISH, QUEEN
TUNNY, LITTLE
PARROTFISH, REDFIN
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN
MACKEREL, KING
PARROTFISH, REDTAIL
PARROTFISH, REDBAND
SCHOOLMASTER
SNAPPER, SILK
BALLYHOO
CONEY
GRUNT, BLUESTRIPED
GRUNT, WHITE
SNAPPER, YELLOWTAIL
JACK, BAR
TANG, BLUE
SNAPPER, GRAY
SNAPPER, MUTTON
SNAPPER, QUEEN
SURGEON, OCEAN
SNAPPER, MAHOGANY
TUNA, YELLOWFIN
2012 value 2013 value mean value
695,578
475,184
585,381
229,891
234,746
232,319
257,395
150,019
203,707
209,344
168,865
189,105
57,273
161,134
109,204
103,353
79,961
91,657
111,310
68,228
89,769
90,700
76,323
83,512
87,374
74,791
81,083
39,107
120,456
79,782
76,655
81,321
78,988
69,048
87,252
78,150
23,667
113,052
68,360
63,420
70,880
67,150
66,321
64,821
65,571
78,074
51,715
64,895
47,812
77,663
62,738
50,085
73,279
61,682
65,731
57,419
61,575
64,061
51,711
57,886
62,041
41,649
51,845
56,401
44,984
50,693
31,794
65,944
48,869
56,950
40,675
48,813
46,083
39,480
42,782
49,161
34,960
42,061
23,193
20,459
21,826
24,920
13,100
19,010
15,480
18,888
17,184
29,932
4,171
17,052
U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Fisheries | Page 13
Species Selection Criteria
Island-based FMPs
• Concept of Thresholds
• Are there upper and
lower thresholds (lbs,$)
for inclusion and/or
exclusion of species?
• Where would thresholds
be applied?
• Can concept of
Ecosystem Component
Species be applied?
Habitat Specificity Range
Economic Importance
Target Species
Bycatch
Yearly Mean Landings
Ecological Value
Protected/Managed Resource
Species Selection Criteria
Concept of Thresholds
• St. Thomas/St.John – 101 species (or groups)
• St. Croix – 99 species
• Puerto Rico
– Commercial – 174 species
– Recreational – 226 species
• All included species need ACLs
Species Selection Criteria
Concept of Thresholds
Example: Puerto Rico commercial landings
• 48 “species” within 99% cumulative landings
• 125 species above 99%
• Those above range from 3,000 lbs to 1 lb average
• But include
– Nassau, goliath, yellowfin & yellowedge groupers
– Rainbow parrotfish
– Cubera, dog, gray, schoolmaster & mahogony
snappers
– Sharks and rays
• Problems with FMUs and data at family level
Draft Criteria
• Biology – defined as question of
vulnerability/productivity. Is species particularly at
risk?
• Habitat Specificity– defined as a question of
vulnerability due to particular dependence on limited
or vulnerable habitat during some life stage
• Range – defined as whether species is either 1)
effectively limited to local waters, 2) limited to EEZ, 3)
spans both, or 4) is a HMS [=State vs EEZ]
• Economic Importance – defined as total economic
value, not just ex-vessel price. This would include, for
example, nonconsumptive use, recreational value,
targeted species, “filler” species and socio-cultural
importance
Draft Criteria
• Target species vs Bycatch
• Landings – to be used first to establish lower and upper
thresholds for automatic rejection from or inclusion in
an FMP, respectively.
• Ecological Value Importance– defined as having a
unique or large ecological function relative to habitat
(esp. coral reefs), or trophic/community structure, e.g.,
keystone species, apex predator, key forage species
such that management is needed to sustain that
function.
• Protected/Management Status – defined as whether
the species is fully protected or partially protected
within an existing management framework within EEZ
or local waters
Recommendations to CFMC
• DAP Puerto Rico PR DAP meeting March 11
2015.docx
• DAP St. Thomas/St. John STT DAP meeting
March 18 2015.docx
• DAP St. Croix STX DAP meeting March 16
2015.docx
• SSC SSC Report March 2015 draft.docx
Choosing Species to Manage in the U.S. Caribbean
DISCUSSION REVISED Alternative Approach 3 (DAPs):
3) Use a stepwise selection process:
A)
Include for management those species that are classified as overfished in U.S.
Caribbean waters based on NOAA Fisheries’ determination, or for which
historically identified harvest is now prohibited due to their ecological importance
as habitat (corals presently included in the Corals and Reef Associated Plants and
Invertebrates FMP) or habitat engineers (midnight, blue, rainbow parrotfish);
B)
From the remainder, exclude from federal management those species that have
been determined to not occur in federal waters based on expert analysis of the
species distribution and range;
C)
From the remainder, consider the species as a component of the catch;
D)
From the remainder, apply an integrated attributes analysis: score the remaining
species using a tabular approach, with those scoring above a threshold level
included for federal management.