Fundamentals of Menu Planning Presentation

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Transcript Fundamentals of Menu Planning Presentation

Fundamentals of Menu
Planning 2
Summer 2016
Welcome
 Introductions
 Name
 District
 Role within District
 What do you hope to get out of today’s class?
 [email protected] Food Initiative introduction
 Norms, Expectations, Housekeeping
2
Learning Objectives
 Understand CN labeling, product formulation statements and





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3
appropriate crediting information for school meal pattern
Use the Food Buying Guide
Calculate meal pattern contributions
Analyze menus for school meal pattern requirements
Identify whole grain-rich products
Complete menu production records, standardized recipes and other
required paperwork
Apply training concepts to food demonstrations presented
Food-Based Menu Planning
5 food components in school meals
 Fruits
 Vegetables
 Grains
 Meat/Meat Alternate
 Milk
Food component – one of the five food groups which comprise reimbursable meals
4
Creditable Fruits Include:
 Fresh, Frozen, Dried, 100% Fruit Juice

Fruit
Component
5
100% fruit juice cannot exceed ½ total weekly
fruit offering
 Fruit canned in light syrup, water, or 100%
fruit juice
 Minimum creditable serving is 1/8 cup
 Credit as volume served, with exception of
dried fruit which credits as twice the volume
Vegetable Component and Subgroups
 Fresh, frozen, canned, 100% vegetable juice

Vegetable
Component
6
100% vegetable juice cannot exceed ½ total
weekly vegetable offering
 Organized into subgroups based on their
nutrition content
 Minimum creditable serving is 1/8 cup
 Credit as volume served, with exception to
leafy greens (1/2 of total volume)
Meat and Meat Alternates
 Meats, dairy products, eggs, legumes, nuts
Meat/Meat
Alternate
Component
and seeds
 Minimum creditable serving is 0.25 oz.
equivalent
Meat Alternate Examples:
Cheese
Eggs
Nuts and
Seeds
Yogurt
Legumes
7
Milk
Milk Component and Variety
 At least 2 choices must be offered
 Fluid milk must be:
Milk
Component



1% milk fat, unflavored
Fat-free, unflavored or flavored
Lactose-free, 1% unflavored; fat-free unflavored
or flavored
 Milk substitutes (non-dairy milk requests)
must meet specific nutrition standards
 Disability milk accommodations not subject to
these requirements
8
Whole grain-rich Grains and Breads
 All grains servings offered must be whole
Grains
Component
grain-rich
 Must contain at least 50% whole grains and
the remaining grains, if any, must be enriched.
 Waiver available for documented hardship
 Minimum creditable serving is 0.25 oz.
equivalent
Pastas
9
Breads
Rice
Identifying Whole Grain-Rich Products
Grains
Component
What to look for . . .
 CN Label
 “oz. equivalent grains”
 Manufacturer product formulation statement
 Contains at least 8 grams of whole grain per oz.
eq.
 Specific FDA approved health claims
 Ingredient list
 Weight in recipes
Health Claims
 Look for these statements on packaging
Grains
Component
“Diets rich in whole grain foods and
other plant foods, and low in saturated
fat and cholesterol, may reduce the
risk of heart disease.”
“Diets rich in whole grain foods and
other plant foods, and low in total fat,
saturated fat, and cholesterol, may
reduce the risk of heart disease and
certain cancers.”
Ingredient List
First ingredient in list.
Grains
Component
Batter Ingredients: Water, whole wheat flour, whole
grain corn, sugar, leavening (sodium acid
pyrophosphate, sodium bicarbonate), soy flour,
soybean oil, salt, egg yolk with sodium
silicoaluminate, ascorbic acid, egg white, dried
honey, artificial flavor.
First grain ingredient in
list.
Recipes
Recipe: 002263 Whole Grain Bread Stick
Number of Portions: 300
Size of Portion: 1 OZ
Grains
Component
050401 Flour, Whole Wheat . . . 5 LB + 4 OZ
050385 Flour, All Purpose . . . . . 4 LB + 12 OZ
075151 Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 QT + 1 ½ CUP
990063 Margarine . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CUP
000054 Milk, nonfat . . . . . . . . . . 2 CUP
000992 Yeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CUP
075090 Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CUP
089630 Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .¼ CUP
Total weight of whole grain
ingredients must meet or
exceed the total weight of the
non-whole grain/grain
ingredients.
Grain-based Desserts
 No grain-based dessert limit at breakfast
 Some grain products can only be served as
desserts in lunch and are not allowable in
breakfast (brownies, cookies)
Activity
;
Creditable Components
Grains and Breads:
Crediting
16
Grains
 If a grain product weighs one ounce, it does not necessarily
provide one once equivalent grain
 This is because different grain products contain different amounts
of grain
 0.25 oz. is the smallest creditable amount
 All grains must be whole grain-rich
 Waiver available for documented hardship
 Before determining grain contributions you must first
determine if the product is whole grain-rich
 USDA Whole Grain Resource:
http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/whole-grain-resource
17
Crediting Grains
Manufacturer’s
Spec or CN label
• Obtain a manufacturer’s product specification
sheet, Child Nutrition (CN) label, or USDA
Foods Fact Sheet
Exhibit A
• Determine the item’s weight per serving and
refer to Exhibit A
• Need ingredient list and nutrition facts panel
Food Buying
Guide
Calculate grains
in a recipe
18
• Use FBG to determine amount of product
needed for the desired number of grain
servings
• Calculate the total amount of grams creditable
grain, divide by 16 and then divide by the
number of servings the recipe yields
CN Label
19
Product Formulation Statement
20
USDA Food Fact Sheet
21
How to Use Exhibit A
Group A
Minimum Serving Size for Group A
• Bread type coating
• Bread sticks (hard)
• Chow Mein noodles
• Crackers (saltines and snack crackers)
• Croutons
• Pretzels (hard)
• Stuffing (dry) Note: weights apply to
bread in stuffing.
1 oz eq = 22 gm or 0.8 oz
¾ oz eq = 17 gm or 0.6 oz
½ oz eq = 11 gm or 0.4 oz
¼ oz eq = 6 gm or 0.2 oz
Step 1: find the product in a group
on the left hand side of the chart.
Step 2: look on the right hand
side to determine the minimum
serving size required for that
product.
1.
Grams/cups in one serving of
product
(from Nutrition Facts Panel)
Divide:
#1 ÷ #2 = #3
48 g
÷
2. Grams/Cups for 1 oz.
equivalent (from Exhibit A)
28 g (group B)
3. Oz. equivalents of
grain
=
For one portion ÷
4. Grain oz. eq. per portion =
23
1.714 oz eq
1
1.5 oz eq
1.
Grams/cups in one serving of
product
(from Nutrition Facts Panel)
Divide:
#1 ÷ #2 = #3
32 g
÷
2. Grams/Cups for 1 oz.
equivalent (from Exhibit A)
28 g (group B)
3. Oz. equivalents of
grain
=
For one portion ÷
4. Grain oz. eq. per portion =
1.143 oz eq
1
1.0 oz eq
Food Buying Guide
 Provides:
 Serving data by number of grain servings or by volume
 Same information as Exhibit A
 Additional grain products
 Yield information
25
Food Buying Guide
26
Calculate the grain servings in a recipe
Maple Bread
Yield: 80 portions
Recipes
Step 1: Identify
information
needed
*Yield
*Grain ingredients
and their
measures
27
Each portion: 1 slice
Ingredients
Measures
Sugar, granulated
1lb + 14 oz
Oil, vegetable
1 cup
Eggs, frozen
2 cup
Applesauce
1 cup
Maple flavoring
3 fl oz
Flour, All Purpose
0 lb + 10 2/3 oz
Flour, Ultra Grain Whole
Wheat White
1 lb + 5 1/3 oz
Cinnamon
2 tbsp = 2 tsp
Salt
.66 tsp
Milk
1 lb
Calculate the grain servings in a recipe
Recipes
Step 2: Divide the
total grams of
creditable grains
by the # of
portions
28
Yield = 80 Portions
Enriched, All purpose flour = 10 2/3 oz.
Ultra Grain Whole Wheat White Flour = 1 lb. + 5 1/3 oz.
If measures are not listed in grams, convert the measures to grams!
Conversions (Food Buying Guide, Grains section)
Number of pounds
X 453.6 grams
Number of ounces
X 28.35 grams
Number of cups of enriched
white flour
X 125 grams
Number of cups of whole
wheat flour
X 120 grams
Calculate the grain servings in a recipe
Convert, then add the total grams together
Recipes
Determine total
grams of
creditable grain
Yield = 80 Portions
Enriched, all purpose flour = 10 2/3 oz.
Ultra Grain Whole Wheat White Flour = 1 lb. + 5 1/3 oz.
(10.6667 X 28.35 grams) = 302.40945
+ (1 X 453.6 grams) = 453.6
+ (5.3333 X 28.35 grams) = 151.19905
= 907.2085 grams of grain
29
Maple Bread
1.
How to Calculate
Grain
Contributions in
a Recipe
Total grams of
creditable grain
ingredient (whole grain
flour/meal plus
enriched flour/meal)
907.2085 g
Divide:
2. There are 16
#1 ÷ #2 = grams per ounce
#3
equivalent for
grains
÷
16 g
3. Oz. equivalents of
grain
=
4. Portions per recipe ÷
56.701 oz eq
80
5. Grain oz. eq. per portion =
0.71 rounds
down to 0.5 oz. eq.
Activity
 Calculate Grain component contributions with LiveWell Recipe
 Hints:
 Craisy Pumpkin Breakfast Bars: 2C +6 Tbsp= 2.25 cups
 Whole Wheat Flour Conversion
 Cups x 120 = grams
 1 lb. dry Oats = 6 cups (from the Food Buying Guide)
 Oats = 90 grams per 1 cup
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Recipe Grain Contribution
Worksheet
 There is an Excel worksheet that will do the math for you
 Worksheet for Calculating the Grain Contribution from a Recipe:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutrimenuplanning
32
Grains Review
Manufacturer’s
Spec or CN label
• Obtain a manufacturer’s product specification
sheet, Child Nutrition (CN) label, or USDA
Foods Fact Sheet
Exhibit A
• Determine the item’s weight per serving and
refer to Exhibit A
• Need ingredient list and nutrition facts panel
Food Buying
Guide
Calculate grains
in a recipe
33
• Use FBG to determine amount of product
needed for the desired number of grain
servings
• Calculate the total amount of grams creditable
grain, divide by 16 and then divide by the
number of servings the recipe yields
LiveWell Recipe Tasting
 Chewy Granola Bars vs. Craisy Pumpkin Breakfast Cookies
 Taste Testing Guidelines & Promotion
 Group Questions on Products
34
School Breakfast Program
Meal Pattern Requirements
35
Breakfast Meal Pattern
Meal Pattern
Amount of Food Per Week (Minimum per day)
Grades K - 5
Grades 6 – 8
Grades 9 - 12
5 (1)
5 (1)
5 (1)
Grains (oz. eq.)
7-10 (1)
8-10 (1)
9-10 (1)
Fluid Milk (cup)
5 (1)
5 (1)
5(1)
Grades K - 5
4 (1)
Grades 6 – 8
4 (1)
Grades 9 - 12
4 (1)
Grains (oz. eq.)
5.5-8 (1)
6.5-8 (1)
7-8 (1)
Fluid Milk (cup)
4 (1)
4 (1)
4 (1)
5-day Week
Fruit (cup)
4-day Week
Fruit (cup)
 All 3 grade groups overlap
 Can use one menu for K-12 (use 9-12 grade range for grains)
36
Optional Meat/Meat
Alternates
 Breakfast meal pattern does not require a meat/meat
alternate
 SFAs that wish to offer a meat/meat alternate at breakfast
have two options
1. Credit the meat/meat alternate as a grain item
2. Offer the meat/meat alternate as an extra item
 Common breakfast M/MA:
• Cheese
• Yogurt
• Sausage
• Egg
• Ham
Meat/Meat Alternate In Place of Grains
 When crediting the meat/meat alternate as a grain item in
breakfast:
 Must also offer at least one ounce equivalent of grains daily
 Must count the meat/meat alternate toward the daily and weekly
grain minimums and the weekly dietary specifications
1 oz. eq. Grain
1 oz. eq. M/MA
Dietary Specifications
Grade Group
Calories
K–5
350 – 500
6–8
400 – 550
9 - 12
450 - 600
Sodium
≤540 mg
≤600 mg
≤640 mg
 Zero grams of trans fat per portion
 Saturated Fat ≤10%
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Age/Grade Calorie Ranges
Grade: K-5
Grade: 6-8
Grade: 9-12
Age: 5-10
Age: 11-13
Age: 14-18
Range: 350-500
Range: 400-550
Range: 450-600
Overlap:
400-500
Overlap:
450-550
Overlap: 450-500
Offer vs. Serve
School Breakfast Program
What is OVS?
 Concept that applies to menu
planning and the determination of
reimbursable meals
 Allows students to decline a certain
number of food components in the
meal
42
Signage
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OVS at Breakfast
 Always offer all three components in at least the required amounts
 For OVS, must offer at least four food items at breakfast
 Students must select at least 3 items (if more than 4 items are
offered, they may decline more than one)
 For purposes of OVS, an item is the daily required minimum
amount of each food component that a child can take
 1 cup of milk
 1 oz eq. of grains
 1 cup of fruit (or veg)
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OVS- Grains (part 1)
 A large grain can count as more than one food item for
purposes of OVS in breakfast
 e.g. 2 oz. eq. muffin = 2 food items
 In addition to the 2 oz. grain, at least 2 other food items
must also be offered to have OVS
 Student cannot decline the 2oz grain item
45
Example #1 2 oz eq Grain:
School offers 2 oz eq muffin, 1 cup apples, and milk
 4 Items Offered
 Choices:
 Muffin + Apples + Milk
 Muffin + ½ cup of Apples
X ½ cup of Apples + Milk
46
Example #2 - 2 oz eq Grain
School offers 2 oz eq muffin, ½ cup apples, ½ cup juice, and
milk
 5 Food Items Offered
Muffin + Apples + Juice+ Milk
Muffin + Apples + Milk
Muffin + Juice + Milk
Apples + Juice + Milk*
* This would only be allowed in SBP, not NSLP
47
OVS- Grains (part 2)
 Grains-meat/meat alternate combination items
 When counting the meat/meat alternate as grains, the combo
may count as two food items
 Example: egg sandwich w/ 1 oz. eq. of grains and 1 oz. eq. of
m/ma counting as grains = 2 food items
48
OVS-Grains (part 3)
 Allowing students to take two of the same grain item
 If a menu planner offers two different 1 oz. eq. grain items at
breakfast, a student may be allowed to take two of the same
grain and count as two items
 Example: school offers milk and fruit, plus two grains: cereal
(1 oz. eq.) and toast (1 oz. eq.)
 Student could select fruit and two toasts
 2nd toast selected in place of other grain offered (cereal)
 Only one item (milk) declined
49
Kitchen Math
 Fruit – cups
 Vegetable – cups
 Grains – ounces (weight)
 Meat/Meat Alternate – ounces (weight)
 Milk – cups or fluid ounces
Important! Do Not Confuse
Weight and Volume Measure
Weight is ounces,
lbs, etc. for
meats, cheese,
grains, breads
Tool: scale
Volume is fluid
ounces for milk,
juice and portion
sizes of fruit and
vegetables
Tools: measuring
cup, qt, gal, etc
What Do You Want To Serve?
The Production Record Says “4oz”
2 Cups (volume) = 4 oz (weight)
½ cup (volume) = 1 oz (weight) = 2 leaves
Food Buying Guide
Overview
53
The Food Buying Guide
 The Food Buying Guide (FBG) helps you:
 Buy the right amount of food
 Determine the contribution each food makes toward the meal
pattern requirements
 http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/food-buying-guide-school-mealprograms
54
Columns
55
Column 1
Food Item, As Purchased
Column 2
Purchase Unit (#, can, etc)
Column 3
Number of Servings per Unit, Edible Portion
Column 4
Serving Size
Column 5
Number of Purchase Units for 100 servings
Column 6
Additional Information
Food Buying Guide Calculator
56
http://fbg.nfsmi.org/
Fruits and Vegetables
57
Fruits and Vegetables
 All servings are measured by volume not weight
 Find the weight (pounds, ounces) converted to volume (cups,
teaspoons, tablespoons) in the Food Buying Guide
 1/8 cup is the smallest creditable amount
Fruits and Vegetables
Volume exceptions:
 Raw leafy greens count for 1/2 the volume (1 cup spinach and
romaine mixture = ½ cup dark green vegetable)
 Dried fruit count as 2x the volume (1/4 cup raisins = ½ cup fruit)
Vegetable subgroup reminders:
 To credit mixtures to a specific vegetable subgroup, you need to
know the exact quantities of each vegetable within the mixture
 If you cannot verify, you can count non-starchy mixtures as
“other” and starchy mixtures as “additional”
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Example
 Use the Food Buying Guide for fruits and vegetables in a recipe
 A recipe has 5-No 10 cans of canned green beans
1.
Quantity of
ingredient as
purchased
5- No. 10 Cans
Multiply:
#1 x #2 = #3
2. Servings per purchase unit for ¼
cup fruit/vegetable
(column 3 in FBG)
X
3. Fruit/Vegetable
Contribution
=
4.
Portions per recipe ÷
100
5. Divide by 4 to get units in cups ÷
4
6. Cups for fruit/vegetable per portion =
60
Example
61
Example
 Use the Food Buying Guide for fruits and vegetables in a recipe
 A recipe has 5-No 10 cans of canned green beans
1.
Quantity of
ingredient as
purchased
5- No. 10 Cans
Multiply:
#1 x #2 = #3
2. Servings per purchase unit for ¼
cup fruit/vegetable
(column 3 in FBG)
X
45.30
3. Fruit/Vegetable
Contribution
=
4. Portions per recipe ÷
100
5. Divide by 4 to get units in cups ÷
4
6. Cups for fruit/vegetable per portion =
62
226.5
0.5 cups
Juice
 100% fruit juice can be credited to meet no more than ½ of the
fruit component offered over the week
Fruit
Type
Mon
Tues
Wed
Thurs
Fri
Total
Juice
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
2.5 cups
Fresh
Fruit
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
2.5 cups
Total
5 cups
 Divide total juice offered over the week by total amount of fruit (fruit plus
Juice) offered over the week times 100. Must be 50% or less over the week.
 2.5 cups juice ÷ 5 cups total fruit x 100 = 50% (compliant)
Production Records
Production Records
What are production records?
 Production records are planning, communicating, and
forecasting tools.
 CDE Template Example:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutrimenuplanni
ng
Production Records
Why use production records?
 They help determine…
 Which items are most/least popular?
 Do you need to purchase/prepare more or less of a given
item the next time?
 Does equipment meet production needs?
 Are staff responsibilities delegated effectively?
7 CFR Section 210.10(a)(3)
 SFAs must keep production records for the meals they
produce.
 Records must:
 Show how meals offered contribute to the required food
components and food quantities for each grade group each
day
 Show what was actually planned, offered and served
 Be kept for three years plus the current year
Activity
 Identify what is wrong with the production
record
Salad Bar
 Salad bar recipe
 Ingredients are documented in your recipe and “Salad Bar” is
documented on your production record
 If there are additions to the salad bar recipe, these items must be
documented on the production record
 If an item is omitted from the salad bar recipe, you cannot use the
recipe and must document each item on the production record
 Document each item served on the salad bar on the
production record
 Daily production record or
 Salad bar production record
Chef Demonstration
 Calculating Product Yield with Fruits and Vegetables
 Fruit: Cuties, Oranges
 Vegetables: cucumber, red pepper
 Group Activities:
 Complete Yield Study test for Demonstration
 Complete crediting fruits and vegetables on salad bar production
record
70
Meat and Meat Alternates
71
Crediting Meat/Meat Alternate
Food Buying
Guide
• For unprocessed items, with a
standard of identity, refer to FBG for
cooked yields or edible portions of
raw meat
CN Label, USDA • If the food is a processed item, use
Food Fact Sheet,
a CN label, USDA Food Fact Sheet,
or Manufacturers
or obtain a manufacturer’s product
specification
specification sheet
Meat/Meat Alternate
 If a M/MA product weighs one ounce, it does not necessarily
provide one once equivalent M/MA
 This is because many factors affect yield, including:
 Processing
 Cooking method and time
 0.25 oz. is the smallest creditable amount
73
Food Buying Guide
 Use the Food Buying Guide (FBG) for unprocessed items
Example: 7 lbs. Pork Sausage, fresh or frozen
1.
Quantity of ingredient as
purchased
7 lbs.
Multiply:
#1 x #2 = #3
X
2. Servings per purchase
unit (column 3 in FBG)
3. Meat/Meat alternate
(oz. equivalents)
=
4. Portions per recipe ÷
5. M/MA oz. eq. per portion =
74
50
Food Buying Guide
75
Food Buying Guide
 Use the Food Buying Guide (FBG) for unprocessed items
Example: 7 lbs. Pork Sausage, fresh or frozen
1.
Quantity of ingredient as
purchased
7 lbs.
Multiply:
#1 x #2 = #3
X
2. Servings per purchase
unit (column 3 in FBG)
7.52
3. Meat/Meat alternate
(oz. equivalents)
=
4. Portions per recipe ÷
5. M/MA oz. eq. per portion =
76
52.64 oz
50
1.0 oz
CN Label Example
To learn more about the Child Nutrition labeling program visit the FNS
website:
http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnlabeling/child-nutrition-cn-labeling-program
77
USDA Food
Fact Sheet
http://www.fns.us
da.gov/fdd/nslpusda-foods-factsheets
78
Manufacturer’s
Specification
79
Processed Items
 Use the product formulation statement, USDA Food Fact
Sheet, or CN label
 Example: 6.5 lbs. of Roasted Turkey Breast Sliced
1.
Total creditable
amount of
product (per
portion in oz.)
2. Total weight (per 3. Divide:
portion) as
#1 ÷ #2 =
purchased (in oz.)
#3
÷
80
=
4. Quantity of
ingredient as
purchased in recipe
(in oz.
5. Meat/Meat alternate
(oz. equivalents)
Multiply:
#3 x #4 = #5
x 104 oz (6.5 lbs.)
=
6. Portions per recipe ÷
7. M/MA oz. eq. per portion =
30
Processed Items
81
Processed Items
1.
Total creditable
amount of
product (per
portion in oz.)
2 oz
82
2. Total weight (per 3. Divide:
portion) as
#1 ÷ #2 =
purchased (in oz.)
#3
÷
3.35 oz
=
0.597
4. Quantity of
ingredient as
purchased in recipe
(in oz.
5. Meat/Meat alternate
(oz. equivalents)
Multiply:
#3 x #4 = #5
x 104 oz (6.5 lbs.)
=
6. Portions per recipe ÷
7. M/MA oz. eq. per portion =
62.088 oz
30
2.0 oz
Meat/Meat Alternate Review
Food Buying
Guide
• For unprocessed items, with a
standard of identity, refer to FBG for
cooked yields or edible portions of
raw meat
CN Label, USDA • If the food is a processed item, use
Food Fact Sheet,
a CN label, USDA Food Fact Sheet,
or Manufacturers
or obtain a manufacturer’s product
specification
specification sheet
Lunch
Presented by LiveWell
Colorado
Menu
Southwest Spiced Chicken
Soy Roasted Broccoli
Brown Rice Pilaf
National School Lunch Program
Meal Pattern Requirements
Lunch Meal Pattern
Meal Pattern
5-day Week
Fruit (cup)
Vegetables (cup)
Dark green
Red/Orange
Beans/Peas (Legumes)
Starchy
Other
Additional to reach total
Grains (oz. eq)
Meat/Meat Alternate (oz.
eq)
Fluid Milk (cup)
Amount of Food Per Week (Minimum per day)
Grades K - 5
Grades 6 – 8
Grades 9 - 12
2 ½ (½)
2 ½ (½)
5 (1)
3 ¾ (¾)
3 ¾ (¾)
5 (1)
½
½
½
¾
¾
1¼
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
¾
1
8-9 (1)
8-10 (1)
1
8-10 (1)
9-10 (1)
1½
10-12 (2)
10-12 (2)
5 (1)
5 (1)
5(1)
Dietary Specifications
Grade Group
Calories
K–5
550 - 650
6–8
600 – 700
9 - 12
750 - 850
Sodium
≤ 1,230
≤ 1,360
≤ 1,420
 Zero grams of trans fat per portion
 Saturated Fat ≤10%
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Age/Grade Calorie Ranges
Grade: K-5
Grade: 6-8
Grade: 9-12
Age: 5-10
Age: 11-13
Age: 14-18
Range: 550-650
Range: 600-700
Range: 750-850
Overlap:
600-650
Calculating Weekly Ranges
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Mac & cheese
with a roll
2 Grains
1 M/MA
Super Sloppy
Joe
2 Grains
2 M/MA
Cheese pan
pizza
2 Grains
1 M/MA
Stir Fry
Bronco Burger
1 Grain
2 M/MA
2 Grains
2 M/MA
Ham and
cheese
sandwich
2 Grains
2 M/MA
Turkey and
cheese
sandwich
2 Grains
2 M/MA
Meatball
Submarine
Grilled chicken
sandwich
2 Grains
1.5 M/MA
Peanut butter
and jelly
sandwich
2 Grains
1 M/MA
Min
2 Grains
1 M/MA
2 Grains
2 M/MA
2 Grains
1 M/MA
1 Grain
1 M/MA
2 Grains
2 M/MA
Max
2 Grains
2 M/MA
2 Grains
2 M/MA
2 Grain
1.5 M/MA
2 Grains
2 M/MA
2 Grains
2 M/MA
Grain Range: 9 – 10 servings
M/MA Range: 7 – 9.5 servings
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2 Grains
2 M/MA
Vegetable Subgroups
5-day Week
K-5
6-8
9-12
Dark Green
½c
½c
½c
Red/Orange
¾c
¾c
1¼c
Beans/Peas
½c
½c
½c
Starchy
½c
½c
½c
Other
½c
½c
¾c
Additional
1c
1c
1½c
3 ¾ cups
3 ¾ cups
5 cups
Weekly
Totals
Multiple Offerings
 There is no daily subgroup requirement
 Each serving line must offer all the vegetable subgroups
weekly
 If a school serves two of the weekly subgroups the same day
and the student may choose only one:
 Must offer both of these subgroups to students on an additional
day
 Use Vegetable Subgroup Decision Tree for complicated
scenarios
 http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutrilunchprogram
Offer vs. Serve
National School Lunch Program
OVS Lunch Requirements
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Combination Foods
Beef Taco:
Grain/Bread,
Vegetables,
Meat/Meat
Alternate
Pepperoni
Pizza:
Grain/Bread &
Meat/Meat
Alternate
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Ham
Sandwich:
Grain/Bread
Meat Alternate,
Vegetables
Macaroni
and
Cheese:
Grain/Bread &
Meat Alternate
Let’s Practice
Are these meals reimbursable?
Reimbursable?
Reimbursable?
orange: ½ cup
rice: ½ cup (1 grain)
burrito: 2 oz eq. meat and 1 oz eq. grain
carrots: ½ cup
milk: 1 cup
K-5
YES
6-8
YES
9-12
YES
Reimbursable?
rice: ½ cup (1 grain)
burrito: 2 oz eq. meat and 1 oz eq. grain
bread roll: 1.25 oz eq. grain
K-5
NO
6-8
NO
9-12
NO
Reimbursable?
corn: ½ cup
milk: 1 cup
bread roll: 1.25 oz eq. grain
K-5
YES
6-8
YES
9-12
NO
Meal Pattern Documentation
Requirements
Meal Pattern Documentation
Requirements
 SFAs are required to maintain the following documentation (at a
minimum) to demonstrate compliance with the meal pattern
requirements:
 Meal pattern contribution documentation
 Product information (e.g. product formulation statements, Child
Nutrition labels, etc.)
 Recipes
 Menus
 Production records
 Receipts/Invoices
Meal Pattern Contribution
Requirement
 SFAs are required to document how foods offered credit
toward the meal pattern requirements
 SFAs must document meal pattern contributions in one of the
following places:
 In recipes
 On production records
 In a separate document. Examples include:
 Menu Planning Tool - Includes Worksheets and Production Records
(Source: Kansas Department of Education)
 USDA Certification Worksheets
Requirements for Processed
Products
 Meat/meat alternate
 Child Nutrition (CN) label
 Signed product formulation statement
 USDA Foods Fact Sheet
 Grains
 Child Nutrition (CN) label
 Signed product formulation statement
 USDA Foods Fact Sheet
 A Nutrition Facts Panel with the grams or ounces per serving AND
an ingredient list
Dietary Specifications
 To determine compliance with dietary specifications (calories,
saturated fat, trans fat and sodium), must have one of the
following:
 Nutrition Facts Panel
 Nutrient information from the manufacturer
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Activity
 Decide whether or not the documentation is acceptable to
determine the meal component contribution
Standardized Recipes
 Definition: a recipe that has been tried, adapted, and retried
several times for use by a given foodservice operation and has
been found to produce the same good results and yield every
time when the exact procedures are used with the same type of
equipment and the same quantity and quality of ingredients
 Standardized recipes are required when:
 menu items have two or more ingredients
 when there is any preparation involved
 Standardized Recipe Template:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutrimenuplanning
Why Standardized Recipes?
 Cost
 Purchasing & Inventory
 Yields & Portions
 Employee Confidence
 Consistent Food Quality
 Customer Satisfaction
 Accurate Nutrient Content
 Successful Administrative
Review
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Recipe Adjustment Resource
 FruitFromWashington.com has a free calculator that does the
math for you:
 http://www.fruitfromwashington.com/Recipes/scale/recipeconvers
ions.php
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Recipe Analysis Worksheet
 There is an Excel worksheet that will do the math for you
 Worksheet for Calculating the Components in a Recipe:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutrimenuplanning
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Activity- LiveWell Lunch Recipe
 Determine Ordering quantities for lunch recipe
 No Name High School has 400 students
 Use recipe & FBG to determine how much chicken to buy
 Scale USDA Recipe for Brown Rice Pilaf for No Name H.S.
 Use recipe & FBG to determine how much broccoli to buy
 Hint: We are ordering fresh broccoli florets, trimmed, ready-to-use and
serving ¾ cup
 Complete Production Record for all food items
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Resources
 Menu Planning webpage:
 http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutrimenuplanning
 Fundamentals of Menu Planning webpage:
 http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/osnmenuplanningtraining
 Training webpage:
 http://www.cde.state.co.us/nutrition/nutritrainings
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Evaluation
 Please fill out the evaluation
 Follow-up evaluation in October
 Please contact me with any questions:
Jonathan Padia
[email protected]
303-866-3685
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