Chapter 9 - Fernando Haro

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Transcript Chapter 9 - Fernando Haro

Chapter 10
Marketing to Health-Conscious Guests
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Learning Objectives
1. Describe two methods a foodservice
operator can use to gauge customers’ needs
and wants
2. Give three examples of ways to draw
attention to healthy menu options
3. Discuss effective ways to communicate and
promote healthy menu options
4. Explain the importance and extent of staff
training needed to implement healthy menu
options
Learning Objectives
5. Describe two ways to evaluate healthy menu
options
6. Respond with menu ideas for special
requests from guests
7. Discuss how nutrition labeling laws regulate
nutrient content or health claims on
restaurant menus
Marketing
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The process of finding
out what your
customers need and
want, and then
developing, promoting,
and selling the products
and services they
desire
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Gauging Customers’ Needs and Wants
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Interview waitstaff about customer requests
Do a customer survey
Informally get customer feedback
Key in on:
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What are your customers asking for?
Which items are most frequently requested?
How much time does your staff have to meet
these special requests?
Which requests are easy to meet? Which are not?
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Adding Healthy Menu Options to the
Menu
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Who is involved?
How to inform your customers of healthy
options:
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Simply describe the items well
Have waitstaff offer and describe the items
Highlight items with symbols or worlds
Include a separate section on the menu
Add a clip-on to the menu and/or a blackboard or
lightboard
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Menu Terminology
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Use words that are familiar yet cutting-edge
and exciting
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Creamy
Crispy
Spiced
Glazed
Caramelized
Customers generally prefer a good
description of the ingredients, portion size,
and preparation method to kcal, fat, etc.
Promotion
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Advertising
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Sales promotions
Sources of Promotional
Materials
-Food manufacturers
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Publicity
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Press releases
Column for local newspaper
Cooking demonstrations
Restaurant newsletter
-Distributors
-Food marketing boards
and associations
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Staff Training
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Scope and rationale for program
Grand-opening details
Ingredients, preparation, and service for each
menu item
Some basic food and nutrition concepts
How to handle special requests
Merchandising and promotional details
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Questions to Quiz the Crew
1. The bread, cereal, rice, and pasta group is a good source of ___________________.
a. carbohydrate
b. fat
c. protein
d. calcium
2. Which of the following foods contains the most fiber?
a. 1 cup cooked white rice
b. 1 slice white bread
c. 1 slice whole wheat bread
d. 1 cup cooked lentils
3. Which of the following foods contain no added sugar?
a. regular soda
b. cupcakes
c. apple
d. muffin
4. Which of the following foods is highest in fat and saturated fat?
a. banana
b. carrots
c. T-bone steak
d. skinless chicken breast
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Program Evaluation
1.
2.
3.
4.
How did the program do operationally?
Did the food look good and taste good?
How well did each of the healthy menu
options sell? How much did each item
contribute to profits? How did the program
affect profitability?
Did the program increase customer
satisfaction?
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Fine-Tuning the Program: Possibilities
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Develop ongoing promotions to maintain
customer interest
Add, modify, or delete certain menu items.
Change pricing
Improve the appearance of healthy items
Listen to customers more to get future menu
and merchandising ideas
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Responding to Special Guest Requests
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Diet Low in Fat, Saturated Fat, & Cholesterol
Low-Sodium
Vegetarian
High-Fiber
Low-Lactose
Gluten-Free
Low in Added Sugars
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Keep in mind these basic preparations:
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When marinating meats,
there are many no-salt,
no-sugar rubs and
seasonings
Blanched vegetables can
be reheated in a small amount
of seasoned stock, then finished with
whole butter, extra-virgin olive oil, or nut oil
Basic preparations
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Appetizers: hummus, baba
ghanoush, white bean and
roasted garlic with baked
whole-wheat tortilla chips or a variety of vegetables
Create a well-balanced
dressing that is low in fat
and made with extra-virgin
olive oil and good vinegars
and fresh herbs/spices
Basic Preparations
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Keep a stock or clear broth for reheating
vegetables
Desserts: Ricotta cheesecake with a roasted
walnut, spices, and Splenda crust
Berry shortcake
Flourless chocolate cake with
fresh fruit garnish
Diet Low in Fat, Saturated Fat, &
Cholesterol
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Lean beef, poultry and fish
Reduced-fat cheeses
Monounsaturated fats
Lots of fruits, veggies,
and whole grains
Low Sodium Diet
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1 teaspoon salt contains 2300 mg of sodium
Avoid high-sodium processed foods – use
fresh foods
Vegetarian Eating
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Lacto-ovo-vegetarians
Lacto-vegetarians
Vegans
Pesco-vegetarians
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Potential Health Benefits of Vegetarian
Eating
Lower incidence of:
 Hypertension
 Coronary artery disease
 Colon cancer
 Type 2 diabetes
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Why Become Vegetarian??
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Health benefits
 Ecology
 Economics
 Ethics
Religious beliefs
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Nutritional Adequacy of Vegetarian Diets
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Can be nutritionally
adequate when varied
and adequate in
kcalories (except for
vegans who need
vitamin B12)
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Nutrients that need
special attention:
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Vitamin B12
Vitamin D
Calcium
Iron
Zinc
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Vegetarian Food Pyramid
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Menu-Planning Guidelines for Vegetarians
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4.
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Use a variety of plant protein sources at each
meal
Use a wide variety of vegetables
Choose low-fat and nonfat varieties of milk and
milk products and limit eggs
Offer dishes made with soybeans-based
products
For menu ideas, don’t forget to look at the
cuisine of other countries.
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Restaurants and Nutrition Labeling Laws
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Food prepared and served in restaurants or other
foodservices are exempt from mandatory nutrition
labeling found in packaged foods
Restaurants are not exempt from FDA rules
concerning nutrient claims and health claims when
used on menus, table tents, posters, or signs
Any food being used in a health claim may not
contain more than 20% of the Daily Value for fat,
saturated fat, cholesterol, or sodium
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Restaurants and Nutrition Labeling Laws
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When providing nutrition information for a
nutrient or health claim:
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Restaurants do not have to provide the standard
nutrition information profile and more exacting
nutrient content values required in the Nutrition
Facts panel of packaged foods. They can present
the information in any format desired, and they
have to provide only information about the
nutrient(s) that the claim is referring to.
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Restaurants and Nutrition Labeling Laws
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Restaurants may use
symbols on the menu
to highlight the
nutritional content of
specific items. They are
required to explain the
criteria used for the
symbols.
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