Adjectives and Adverbs

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Transcript Adjectives and Adverbs

Adjectives and Adverbs
Chapter 29
Part A Defining and Using
Adjectives and Adverbs
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Adjectives and adverbs are two kinds of
descriptive words.
Adjectives describe or modify nouns or
pronouns.
Adjectives explain what kind, which one,
or how many.
Colors and numbers are adjectives.
Adjectives
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Which words are adjectives?
The Spanish city of Madrid has exciting
nightlife.
→Spanish
exciting
Adverbs
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Adverbs describe or modify verbs,
adjectives, and other adverbs.
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Adverbs tell how, why, when, where, and
to what extent.
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Many adverbs end in -LY
Adverbs
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Which words are adverbs?
The really large Doberman barked
angrily all night.
→really
angrily
all night
Telling Adjectives and Adverbs Apart
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Many adverbs are formed when the ending
-LY is added to an adjective:
Adjective
Adverb
bad
badly
slow
slowly
nice
nicely
quick
quickly
quiet
quietly
real
really
Telling Adjectives and Adverbs Apart
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Some adjectives – for example, lovely,
friendly, and lively -- end in –LY. Be
careful not to use these words as
adverbs.
Remember:
Adjectives describe nouns and
pronouns.
Adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, and
other adverbs.
The Trouble Maker
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One adjective/adverb pair is particularly troublesome:
Adjective
Adverb
good
well
He is a good dancer.
(Good describes the noun dancer.)
He dances well.
(Well describes the verb dances-how does he dance? He
dances well.)
Comparative and Superlative
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The comparative of an adjective or
adverb compares two people or objects.
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The superlative of an adjective or adverb
compares three or more people or
objects, or one to a group.
Forming comparative and
superlative
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Add –ER to make an adjective or adverb
comparative:
Ben is taller than Julie. (MORE tall)
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Add –EST to make an adjective or adverb
superlative.
Ben is the tallest in the class. (MOST tall)
Forming comparative and
superlative
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Adjectives and adverbs of more than one syllable usually form
the comparative by using MORE:
Donna is more beautiful than Tami.
(Beautifuler or more beautifuler is incorrect.)
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Adjectives and adverbs of more than one syllable usually form
the superlative by using MOST:
Donna is the most beautiful girl on stage.
(The same rule applies here. Do not put most and –est words
together. Most beautifulest or beautifulest girl is incorrect
grammar.)
Forming comparative and
superlative
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Note, however, that adjectives that end
in –Y, such as lazy, happy, and sunny
change the Y to I and add –ER or –EST:
Dane is lazier than Lane.
Gabriel is the laziest of all.
The Trouble Makers
Adjective
good
Comparative
better
Superlative
best
bad
worse
worst
Adverb
well
Comparative
better
Superlative
best
badly
worse
worst
Pay attention when using the above words. Good is used as an
adjective and well is used as an adverb. Their comparative and
superlative forms do not look anything like their original form.
Review Chapter 29 for more on
Adjectives and Adverbs.