Developing recognition of Human Rights

download report

Transcript Developing recognition of Human Rights

WALT
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
• Developing recognition of Human Rights
Today
• Understanding declarations, treaties and covenants of Human Rights
• Look at a few case studies
• Improve out short responses
Developing recognition of Human Rights
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
• The term ‘Human Rights’ has developed only recently. Since the mid 1940s there has
been an acknowledgement of essential freedoms and the rights of individuals
• However, the concept of Human Rights has been slowly developing since Ancient
Times.
• The development of Human Rights have been influenced by a number of factors
1.
2.
3.
4.
The idea of state sovereignty
Natural Law
Historic constitutional and international agreements
Movements to recognise specific Human Rights
Developing recognition of Human Rights
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
1. The idea of state sovereignty?
The supreme, absolute, and uncontrollable power by which an independent state is governed and
from which all specific political powers are derived; the intentional independence of a state,
combined with the right and power of regulating its internal affairs without foreign interference
2. Natural Law?
Is based on the idea that there exist certain ‘natural’ laws which apply to all humanity and which
maintain the basic dignity of human beings. I.E. Revolution or Rebellions
Natural law contributed to ideas such as humans having fundamental freedoms
3. Historic constitutional and international agreements?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The Magna Carta 1215
English Common Law
The declaration of Rights 1689 (UK)
American Declaration of Independence 1776
French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen 1789
4. Movements to recognise specific Human Rights?
Abolition of Slavery, Universal Suffrage, Trade Unionism and Labour Rights
Developing recognition of Human Rights
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
Historic constitutional and international agreements
1. The Magna Carta 1215 and English Common Law
i.
Equality before the law, a right to a trial, and Habeas Corpus
(cannot be imprisoned without reason)
2. The Declaration of Rights 1689 (UK)
i.
Establishment of a parliament and its supremacy over the King
3. American Declaration of Independence 1776 and the French Declaration
of the Rights of Man and Citizen 1789
i.
Action's which entrench individual human rights and freedoms are laws
Developing recognition of Human Rights
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
Movements to recognise specific Human Rights
1. Abolition of Slavery
The movement to end slavery and the slave trade, especially Child Slavery
i.
Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery 1956
2. Universal Suffrage
The movement to make sure both men and women could vote and participate in their
government
i. Female Suffrage; South Australia, 1894, NSW and Australia 1902
ii. Indigenous Suffrage; Australia 1962
3. Trade Unionism and Labour Rights
The movement to obtain fair and reasonable working conditions, payment and protection
i. International Labour Organisation; 1919.
Developing recognition of Human Rights
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
4. Universal Education
The movement to give basic education to all children
i.
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 1948
2. Self-Determination
The means for people to govern themselves and choose their own form of government
i.
Article 1 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights 1948
3. Environmental Rights
The movement to encompass the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment
i.
Koyoto Protocol 1998
4. Peace Rights
The right to peace and their government to maintain peace and eliminate war
i.
Declaration on the Right of Peoples to Peace 1984
Mr Daly
Activity
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
Outline how Human Rights have changed over time
T.E.E.L
Topic Sentence, Explain, Evidence, Link
• Natural Law and the inalienable, inherent freedoms we enjoy
• Analyse the following documents about their development of HR;
1. The Magna Carta 1215
2. The Declaration of Rights 1698 (UK)
3. The Declaration of Independence 1776
4. The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen 1789
• Contemporary movements which worked to establish fundamental HR
i. Universal Suffrage;
•
•
Female Suffrage; South Australia, 1894, NSW and Australia 1902
Indigenous Suffrage; Australia 1962
• Therefore, it is evident that HR development is a slow process, seen through both
international and national declarations and movements.
Hong Kong has its own mini parliament in the form of LEGCO, short for the Legislative Council.
Representatives in LEGCO , are either elected by direct election or by electoral college.
Those resident in Hong Kong for more than seven years are eligible to vote in direct elections, however only 1/3 of the council is
elected directly.
The remaining 2/3 are elected by a 20,000 strong functional constituency, this is made up of businessmen and professionals such
as doctors, lawyers, engineers etc.
These groups form into broad parties
formed through mutual interests,
almost always business related.
Activity
Mr Daly
Tuesday, 5 April 2016
Investigate the evolving recognition and importance of Universal Human Rights
T.E.E.L
Topic Sentence, Explain, Evidence, Link
• Natural Law and the inalienable, inherent, indivisible, universal freedoms
• Analyse the recognition of documents/movements and their development
1. Trade and Labour Rights
2. Universal Suffrage
3. Environmental Rights
• Analyse the importance of;
i.
ii.
iii.
Trade Labour Rights; International Labour Organisation; 1919.
Universal Suffrage; Indigenous Suffrage; Australia 1962
Environmental Rights; Kyoto Protocol 1998
• As a result, the evolving recognition and importance of UHR, as seen in Australia,
illustrates a progression toward a fairer and equal society.