Unit 4 - cloudfront.net

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Transcript Unit 4 - cloudfront.net

Greenland GPS Network (GNET) GPS station (station name: NNVN) installed on a nunatak (a
rocky exposure completely surrounded by an ice sheet whose peak is above the ice) north of
Niviarsiat Nunatak, Southern Greenland. Equipment in the foreground is the GPS antenna.
Solar panels and instrument boxes are to the right. Photo courtesy of Mike Bevis (Ohio State
University)
GNET GPS station (name: HJOR) in SE
Greenland. GPS antenna is visible in the photo.
Site was constructed in 2007. Photo by Dana
Caccamise, Ohio State University.
GNET GPS station (name: PLPK) on Pilgupik
Island, SE Greenland. The glacier visible across
the water is Laube Glacier. Photo by Michael
Willis, Cornell University.
Landsat image of Helheim Glacier, 2006. The bright, reflective surface on the right side of the
image is called an ice melange—a composite of sea ice and icebergs.
Left: Digital elevation model (DEM) of Helheim Glacier, 2006. Red star represents study
location for ice elevation data. Brown represents the eleavation of the land surface.
Blue represents elevation of the ice and ocean (Stearns and Hamilton, 2007.)
Right: Vertical displacement (thinning) of the surface of Helheim Glacier from 19952012 derived from repeat satellite and airborne altimetry. Notice that elevation changes
(Csatho et al., 2014).
Vertical displacement of GPS receiver located on bedrock adjacent to Helheim Glacier from
2000-2011 (after Bevis et al., 2012).
Elevation of the surface of Helheim Glacier from 2000-2012 derived from repeat satellite and
airborne altimetry (Csatho et al., 2014).
This work is supported by the National Science Foundation’s Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM program within the
Directorate for Education and Human Resources (DUE-1245025).
Left: 2010 melting day anomaly map for Greenland. The shading on the map illustrates the number of extra days of melting in 2010 relative to the average number of
melting days considering the 1979-2009 data. Students will be focusing on SE Greenland in Unit 4. NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, based on data from
Marco Tedesco, City College of New York.
Right: 2010 uplift anomaly and melting day map for selected Greenland GPS stations. The green arrows illustrate uplift in 2010 relative to the trend from site installation
date (~2000 for most sites). The shading on the map illustrates the number of extra days of melting in 2010 relative to the average number of melting days considering the
1979-2009 data. Students will be focusing on SE Greenland in Unit 4. From Bevis et al., 2012.