Plagiarism is. - Holland College

download report

Transcript Plagiarism is. - Holland College

Plagiarism
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gC2ew6qLa8U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQGBhZ0ov6o
What is Plagiarism?
Taking credit for work that isn’t your own!
Plagiarism is. . .
A breach of the Holland College Code of Conduct
for Learners!
Consequences may range from:
Formal warning
Probation
Suspension, or
Dismissal
Accident or Not
It’s Still Plagiarism When…
• Copying text word for word and failing to put
quotation marks around it even if you cite it
• Inaccurately quoting a source
• Cutting and pasting
• Omitting in-text citations even though the source is
cited on the works cited page
• Failing to include the citation on the works cited pg.
How do I Avoid It?
• Use your own words and ideas
• Give credit for direct quotes using quotation
marks and citing the source
• Give credit for websites, photos, diagrams,
graphics, multimedia
• Paraphrases, restating the author’s words or ideas
in your own words, must be cited
• Cosmetic changes still require a citation, i.e.,
reversing order, changing layout
What’s Your Style?
• The style guide dictates rules for
capitalization, indentation, spacing,
elements of a citation, etc.
• Styles are usually mandated by
subject area or institution, e.g., APA
for Education
• When in doubt, ask your learning
manager
• This slideshow illustrates APA style
Ways of Citing Sources
1. Quoting - the direct quotation of the
words of others
2. Paraphrasing - putting someone else’s
words or ideas in your own words
3. Reference List - details of information
sources cited or paraphrased in your text
or project
1. Quotations
• Double quotation marks around short
quotations (<40 words).
• Longer quotations (>40 words) block
indent and omit quotation marks.
• Changing quotations, i.e., omitting text
(…) or inserting text ([ ])
In Text Short Quotation
(<40 words)
“An honor code usually consists of a signed statement
in which students promise not to cheat and not to
tolerate those who do” (Harris, 2001, p. 117).
In text Long Quotation
(>40 words)
Athletes are searching for anything that will make them more
competitive including nutritional supplements, such as vitamins,
energy bars and drinks that may compensate for dietary
deficiencies, and over-the-counter products like shark cartilage
and amino acids, which purport to increase muscle mass, boost
energy and endurance, prompt weight gain (or loss), or reduce
recovery time between workouts (Jollimore, 2004, p. 54).
Omitting Text from a
Quotation (…)
“Canada supports sustainable development
activities … in habitats that are not critical to
wildlife” (Anderson, 2001).
2. Paraphrasing
• Restating the author’s ideas into your
own words
• Need to do more than just change a
word or two
3. Reference List
• Acknowledges all the sources you have
cited in your project
• Organized in alphabetical order
• Strictly follows citation style format
(APA, MLA . . . )
Reference List
Rules to Remember
1. Only capitalize the FIRST letter of the title,
proper nouns & first letter after a colon.
2. Authors’ names must be inverted, using
only the first & middle initials. For more
than one author use the “&” before the
final name.
3. Indent each line after the first line.
4. Information from an aggregated database can be
identified by the database name, the url is not
necessary.
5. There is no period at the end of a website citation.
6. Personal communications are only cited in text, not in
reference list.
References
Anderson, D. (August 3, 2001). Statement by Environment Minister David Anderson on Arctic
National Wildlife Refuge. Retrieved July 24, 2004, from
http://www.ec.gc.ca/Press/2001/010803_s_e.htm
Blicq, R. (2001). Guidelines for report writing. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada.
Booth, W. C., Colomb, G. G., & Williams, J. M. (1995). The craft of research. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press.
Edwards, C., & Crockett, R. (2007, April 16). New Music Phones--Without the i. Business Week,
Retrieved August 10, 2007, from Academic Search Elite database.
Harris, R. (2001). The plagiarism handbook. Los Angeles: Pyrczak.
Jollimore, M. (June 21, 2004). Fuel’s gold: why Canada’s athletes pay so much attention to what they
eat. Time, 163(25), 52-61.
Reitman, J. (2004). The Baghdad follies. Rolling Stone, 952/953, 110-117.
Reference Generators
Bibme
http://bibme.org
Knightcite
http://www.calvin.edu/library/knightcite/
MSWord 2007
Use the ibrary handout for APA/MLA/Gib.