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Module A: Chapter 1
It’s Alive!! Or Is It?
Section 1: Characteristics of Living Things
Section 2: The Necessities of Life
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 1
Characteristics of Living Things
Bellringer
What are four living and nonliving things that you interact
with every day? How do you know whether each is living or
nonliving? Do you know what the word inanimate means? If
so, write out a definition. Does nonliving mean the same
thing as dead? Explain your answer. Write your answers in
your science journal.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 1
Characteristics of Living Things
Objectives
• Describe the six characteristics of of living things.
• Describe how organisms maintain stable internal
conditions.
• Explain how asexual reproduction differs from sexual
reproduction.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 1
Characteristics of Living Things
Living Things Have Cells
• What Is a Cell? A cell is a membrane-covered structure
that contains all of the materials necessary for life.
• How Many Cells? Some organisms are made up of only
one cell and some are made up of trillions of cells.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 1
Characteristics of Living Things
Living Things Sense and Respond to
Change
• Homeostasis The maintenance of a stable internal
environment is called homeostasis.
• Responding to External Change Organisms must
respond to change in the external environment in order to
maintain their homeostasis.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 1
Characteristics of Living Things
Living Things Reproduce
• Having Offspring Organisms make other organisms
similar to themselves. They do so in one of two ways: by
sexual reproduction or by asexual reproduction.
Living Things Have DNA
• DNA in Cells The cells of all living things contain the
molecule deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 1
Characteristics of Living Things
Living Things Use Energy
• Energetic Organisms Organisms use energy to carry out
the activities of life.
Living Things Grow and Develop
• Growing Up All living things, whether they are made of
one cell or many cells, grow during periods of their lives.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Bellringer
What do you think your mass would be if there were no
water in your body? What else besides water is your body
composed of? Where do you think you get the minerals
that make up your body mass?
Record your answers in your science journal.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Objectives
• Explain why organisms need food, water, air, and living
space.
• Describe the chemical building blocks of cells.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Water
• Thirsty Cells Your cells and the cells of almost all living
organisms are approximately 70% water.
Air
• Oxygen Air is a mixture of several different gases,
including oxygen and carbon dioxide. Most living things use
oxygen in the chemical process that releases energy from
food.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
A Place to Live
• Home Sweet Home All organisms need a place to live
that contains all of the things they need to survive.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Food
• Making Food Some organisms, such as plants, are
called producers. Producers can make their own food.
• Taking Food Other organisms are called consumers
because they must eat (consume) other organisms to get
food.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Putting It All Together
• Using Nutrients Some organisms make their own food.
Some organisms get food from eating other organisms. But
all organisms need to break down that food in order to use
the nutrients in it.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Proteins
• Making Proteins Organisms break down the proteins in
food to supply their cells with amino acids. These amino
acids are then linked together to form new proteins.
• Proteins in Action Proteins have many different
functions. Other proteins are very small and help cells do
their jobs. Other proteins, called enzymes, start or speed
up chemical reactions in cells.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Carbohydrates
• Simple Carbohydrates Simple carbohydrates are made
up of one sugar molecule or a few sugar molecules linked
together.
• Complex Carbohydrates Complex carbohydrates are
made of hundreds of sugar molecules linked together.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Lipids
• Phospholipids Phospholipids are the molecules that
form much of the cell membrane. A phospholipid’s
membrane is shown on the next slide.
• Fats and Oils Fats and oils are lipids that store energy.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Section 2
Phospholipid Molecules and Cell Membrane
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Section 2
The Necessities of Life
Nucleic Acids
• What Are Nucleic Acids? Nucleic acids are large
molecules made up of molecules called nucleotides.
• Blueprints of Life Nucleic acids are sometimes called
the blueprints of life because they have all the information
needed for a cell to make proteins.
End of Slide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 2
It’s Alive!! Or Is It?
Concept Map
Use the following terms to complete the concept map on
the next slide: DNA, sugars, energy, enzymes, living cells
proteins, starches, carbohydrates.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 2
Concept Map
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 2
Concept Map
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.