IOSHA Upodatex

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Transcript IOSHA Upodatex

Electronic Report of Injuries & Illness
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250 Employee’s or more
July 1 2017 Submit 300A Summary
July 1 2018 Submit 300, 300A, 301
March 2 2019 Submit 300, 300A, 301
Electronic Report of Injuries & Illness
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20-249 Employee’s
July 1 2017 Submit 300A
July 1 2018 Submit 300,300A, 301
March 2 2019 Submit 300, 300A, 301
These smaller employers will fall under the
High Risk Industries Listed by NAICS. (North
American Industry Classification System)
• See Handout for list
NAICS------------------Industry
11
22
23
3133
42
4413
4421
4422
4441
4442
4451
4452
4521
4529
4533
4542
4543
4811
4841
4842
4851
4852
4853
4854
4855
4859
4871
4881
4882
4883
4884
4889
4911
4921
4922
4931
5152
5311
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
Utilities
Construction
Manufacturing
Wholesale trade
Automotive parts, accessories, and tire stores
Furniture stores
Home furnishings stores
Building material and supplies dealers
Lawn and garden equipment and supplies stores
Grocery stores
Specialty food stores
Department stores
Other general merchandise stores
Used merchandise stores
Vending machine operators
Direct selling establishments
Scheduled air transportation
General freight trucking
Specialized freight trucking
Urban transit systems
Interurban and rural bus transportation
Taxi and limousine service
School and employee bus transportation
Charter bus industry
Other transit and ground passenger
transportation
Scenic and sightseeing transportation, land
Support activities for air transportation
Support activities for rail transportation
Support activities for water transportation
Support activities for road transportation
Other support activities for transportation
Postal service
Couriers and express delivery services
Local messengers and local delivery
Warehousing and storage
Cable and other subscription programming
Lessors of real estate
NAICS------------------Industry
5321
5322
5323
5617
5621
5622
5629
6219
6221
6222
6223
6231
6232
6233
6239
6242
6243
7111
7112
7121
7131
7132
7211
7212
7213
7223
8113
8123
Automotive equipment rental and leasing
Consumer goods rental
General rental centers
Services to buildings and dwellings
Waste collection
Waste treatment and disposal
Remediation and other waste management
services
Other ambulatory health care services
General medical and surgical hospitals
Psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals
Specialty (except psychiatric and substance
abuse) hospitals
Nursing care facilities
Residential mental retardation, mental health
and substance abuse facilities
Community care facilities for the elderly
Other residential care facilities
Community food and housing, and emergency
and other relief services
Vocational rehabilitation services
Performing arts companies
Spectator sports
Museums, historical sites, and similar institutions
Amusement parks and arcades
Gambling industries
Traveler accommodation
RV (recreational vehicle) parks and recreational
camps
Rooming and boarding houses
Special food services
Commercial and industrial machinery and
equipment (except automotive and electronic)
repair and maintenance
Dry-cleaning and laundry services
Multiple Establishments
The electronic reporting requirements are based on the size of the
establishment, not the firm. The OSHA injury and illness records are
maintained at the establishment level. An establishment is defined as a
single physical location where business is conducted or where services or
industrial operations are performed. A firm may be comprised of one or
more establishments. To determine if you need to provide OSHA with the
required data for an establishment, you need to determine the
establishment's peak employment during the last calendar year. Each
individual employed in the establishment at any time during the calendar
year counts as one employee, including full-time, part-time, seasonal, and
temporary workers.
Drug Testing
The rule does not prohibit drug testing of employees. It only
prohibits employers from using drug testing, or the threat of drug
testing, as a form of retaliation against employees who report
injuries or illnesses. If an employer conducts drug testing to comply
with the requirements of a state or federal law or regulation, the
employer's motive would not be retaliatory and this rule would not
prohibit such testing.
Organization of Subpart D
§1910.21 – Scope, Application
and Definitions
§1910.22 – General
Requirements
§1910.23 – Ladders
§1910.24 – Stepbolts and
Manhole Steps
§1910.25 – Stairways
§1910.26 – Dockboards
§1910.27 – Scaffolds and
Rope Descent Systems
§1910.28 – Duty to Have Fall
Protection
§1910.29 – Fall Protection
Systems Criteria and
Practices
§1910.30 –Training
Requirements
§1910.21
§1910.21 – Scope and definitions
• Consolidates definitions into one section
• Adds new definitions to provide clarity
§1910.22
§1910.22 – General Requirements
• Maintains housekeeping provisions
• Walking-working surfaces must be designed
to meet their maximum intended load, free
of recognized hazards, and routinely
inspected
• Repairs to be done, or overseen, by
competent person
§1910.23
§1910.23 – Ladders.
• Consolidates and simplifies
rules into general
requirements, portable
ladders, fixed ladders, and
mobile ladder stands
• Requires inspection before
use
Fixed Ladders
Portable
Ladders and Step Stools
§1910.23 (cont)
• Updates and makes rule
consistent with current
national consensus standards
Mobile Ladder Stand
Mobile Ladder Stand Platform
§1910.24
§1910.24 – Stepbolts and
manhole steps
• Moves stepbolt criteria from OSHA’s
Telecommunication Standard to
Walking-Working Surfaces
• Makes design, inspection, and
maintenance requirements consistent
with national consensus standards
Step bolts on pole
§1910.25
§1910.25 – Stairways
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Adds design and use criteria for spiral stairs,
ship stairs, and alternating tread-type stairs
Updates design criteria for stairs and
landings, consistent with national consensus
standards
§1910.26
§1910.26 – Dockboards
• Updates requirements for dockboards
• Adds design and construction requirements to
prevent equipment from going over the
dockboard edge
§1910.27
§1910.27 – Scaffolds and Rope Descent Systems
(RDS)
• Requires that employers using scaffolds follow the
construction standard
• Adds provision allowing use of RDS, which codifies a
1991 OSHA memo allowing RDS
• Requires certification of anchorages starting 1 year
after final rule published
• Requires RDS have separate fall arrest system
Rope Descent Systems
§1910.28
§1910.28 – Duty to have fall protection and
falling object protection
• Consolidates general industry fall protection
requirements into one section
• Makes requirements and format consistent with
construction standard
• Incorporates new technology that is consistent with
national consensus standards
• Gives employers flexibility to use the system that works
best to protect workers in their situation
§1910.29
§1910.29 – Fall protection systems criteria
Specifies design and installation requirements of
each fall protection system available to
employers including:
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Guardrails
Stair rails
Designated areas
Safety nets
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Covers
Cages and wells
Ladder safety systems
Toeboards
§1910.30
§1910.30 – Training
• Adds training and retraining requirements
addressing fall hazards and equipment hazards
• Requires employers make training
understandable to workers
§1910.140
§1910.140 – Personal Protective Equipment
(Personal Fall Protection Systems)
• Adds definitions for personal fall protection
systems
• Adds new section on system and use criteria
for:
• Personal fall protection equipment (e.g., lanyards,
ropes, D-rings, harnesses)
• Personal fall arrest systems
• Travel restraint systems
• Work positioning systems
Personal Fall Protection
Work Positioning
Travel Restraint
Personal Fall Arrest
Major Changes
• Fall Protection Flexibility
• Updated Scaffold Requirements
• Phase-in of ladder safety systems or personal fall
arrest systems on fixed ladders
• Phase-out of “qualified climbers” on outdoor
advertising structures
• Rope descent systems
• Adds requirements for personal fall protection
equipment (final §1910.140)
• Adds training requirements
Main Effective Dates
• Rule overall: January 17, 2017
• Training: 6 months after publication
• Building anchorages for RDS: 1 year after
publication
• Fixed ladder fall protection: 2 years after
publication
• Installation of ladder safety system or
personal fall arrest system on fixed ladders:
20 years after publication
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Timeline for Compliance
• June 23 2016. Iowa has 6 months to
adopt the final
• Employer shall establish and
implement a written exposure
control plan
• Designate a competent person
• Restrict housekeeping practices
that expose workers, when feasible
Timeline for compliance
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June 23 2017
Engineering controls shall be in effect.
Wet cutting
Vacuum systems- Dust collection systems
See tables in standard.
Timeline for Compliance
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June 23, 2018
Requirements for method of sample analysis
Additional information www.OSHA.gov/silica
OSHA consultation and Education
Provide air quality monitoring at no cost.
Timeline for Compliance
• June 23 2016. Iowa has 6 months to
adopt the final
• Employer shall establish and
implement a written exposure
control plan
• Designate a competent person
• Restrict housekeeping practices
that expose workers, when feasible
Timeline for compliance
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•
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June 23 2017
Engineering controls shall be in effect.
Wet cutting
Vacuum systems- Dust collection systems
See tables in standard.
Timeline for Compliance
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June 23, 2018
Requirements for method of sample analysis
Additional information www.OSHA.gov/silica
OSHA consultation and Education
Provide air quality monitoring at no cost.