Pathogen reduction HACCP

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Transcript Pathogen reduction HACCP

John R. Ragan, DVM
Livestock Program Leader
USDA, FSIS
Animal Production Food Safety
Food Safety
A Subject Whose Time
Has Come
Pathogen Reduction:
Hazard Analysis and Critical
Control Point (HACCP) Systems
Final Rule
Published
July 25, 1996
Pathogen Reduction/HACCP
Rule and Animal Production

January 26, 1998
 75-80% of food animals
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January 25, 1999
 90-95% of food animals
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January 25, 2000
 100% of food animals
The Seven HACCP Principles
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Conduct a hazard analysis
 Identify Critical Control Points
 Establish limits for each Critical
Control Point
 Establish corrective actions
 Establish recordkeeping procedures
 Establish procedures for verifying that the
HACCP system is working as intended
Why Was HACCP Adopted?

First major change in almost 100 years
 Need to reduce risks of foodborne
illnesses from meat, poultry and
egg products
 HACCP accepted as science-based
preventive risk reduction system
Why Was HACCP Adopted?
Focus on Foodborne Illnesses
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Salmonella
E. coli O157:H7
Campylobacter
Listeria
Pathogen Reduction/HACCP
Final Rule
Slaughter and processing plants
must assume more practical
responsibility for food safety
Pathogen Reduction/HACCP
Rule Part 417.2(a)
Plants must conduct a hazard
analysis “to determine the food
safety hazards reasonably likely to
occur before, during and after entry
into the establishment”
Pathogen Reduction/HACCP
Final Rule
“Those in control of each segment
must bear the responsibility
for identifying and preventing or
reducing food safety hazards.”
1996 Rule, Background
Farm to Table Food Safety
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Animal Production (farm to slaughter)
Slaughter and Processing Plants
Post-Processing Transportation
Wholesale and Retail Stores
Food Service
Consumer Education
Impact of PR/HACCP Rule on
Animal Production Systems
Packers will need more
information on incoming
animals for their HACCP plan.
Slaughter Plant Residue Control
Process

Evaluate significant residue hazards of
incoming animals purchased
 Develop HACCP plan for residue
control
 Determine information needed from
animal suppliers
Slaughter Plant Residue Control
Options for Incoming Animals

Reject animals with a high risk of
violative residues
 Clearly define purchase criteria
 Buy only from suppliers quality
assurance certified
Slaughter Plant Residue Control
Options for Incoming Animals

Refuse to purchase from suppliers with
past residue violations
 Require written assurances or letters of
guarantee of no adulteration
 Have drug or pesticide use records
available
Slaughter Plant Residue Control
Options for Incoming Animals

Periodically test animals or carcasses
for residues
 Obtain verification of proper drug or
pesticide use
High Risk Classes for Violative
(Illegal) Drug Residues

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Bob veal (3 weeks, 150 lbs.)
Culled cows and bulls
Culled boars and sows
Roaster pigs
Hospital pen clean-outs
Residue Avoidance
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Drugs Prohibited in Food Animals
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Clenbuterol
Diethylstilbestrol
Furazolidone parentally
Nitrofurazone parentally
Dimetridazole
Ipronidazole, nitroimidazoles
Model Pathogen Reduction
Project

Has known live animal risk
management control points
 Has diagnostic tests to validate the
system
 Has a reliable audited process
 Can be verified and validated
Animal Production Food Safety
(APFS) in FSIS, USDA

Voluntary - no legal authority over
animals on farm
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Information, Education, Collaboration
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Government, Industry, Academia
Partnerships
Response to HACCP Impact on
Food Animal Production
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Determine specific food safety needs
of purchasers
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Define requirements in costeffective practices
Response to HACCP Impact on
Food Animal Production
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Determine where information
gaps exist
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Focus and support research to
provide solutions
Response to HACCP Impact on
Food Animal Production

Develop awareness of needed
practice changes
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Expedite information transfer to
producers
Response to HACCP Impact on
Food Animal Production
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Encourage participation in QAPs
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Encourage inclusion of appropriate
food safety elements in QAPs
Quality Assurance Programs
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Voluntary
 Industry created guidelines
 Use of good production practices
 Third party certification
Importance of Quality
Assurance Certification

Promotes animal health and food safety
 Ensures proper drug and antibiotic use
 Provides records to assure purchasers
of good production practices
Importance of Verified Quality
Assurance Programs

Provide added assurances to purchasers
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Provide documentation to support
branded products and international
markets
Milk and Dairy Beef Quality
Assurance Program
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Food Safety Control Points
Valid veterinary/client/patient
relationship for drug use
and health
 Storing and administering drugs
 Milk drug screening tests
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Milk and Dairy Beef Quality
Assurance Program
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Certification by veterinarians is an
educational process
Dairy Biosecurity Practices
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QPC #1: Quality, profitability and
keeping pathogens out improved
productivity
 QPC #2: Best management
practices for keeping
infectious disease off the farm
 QPC #3: Use of strategic vaccinations
Dairy Biosecurity Practices
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QPC #4: Calf management
 QPC #5: Diagnostic testing for Johne’s
BVD, Contagious Mastitis, Salmonella
typhimurium and dublin and
Bovine Leukosis
 QPC #6: Biocontainment to
control enteric, reproductive and
respiratory pathogens
Dairy Biosecurity Practices
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QPC #7: Equipment Best Management
Practices for manure disposal,
feeding, etc.
 QPC #8: Sanitation Best
Management Practices for
all stages of production
Pork Quality Assurance
Certification Program
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Level I
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Food safety and HACCP awareness
FDA animal drug use compliance
policy guide explained
Current regulatory
systems included
Level II: Educational self test
Pork Quality Assurance
Certification Program
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Level III: Veterinarian Assisted
 10 Good Production practices Defined
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1 to 6: Residue avoidance practices
7 to 9: Animal health, care and feeding
10: Complete checklist annually
Recertify every two years
Beef Quality Assurance
Certification Program
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Guidelines for proper animal health
product use
 Awareness of feed ingredients
and potential residues
 Total Quality Management
education
 Tailored State by State
Key State Partners in Animal
Production Food Safety
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State veterinarians and State
Department of Agriculture officials
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Local Federal Agency representatives of
USDA and HHS
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Universities - Research, Education,
and Extension
Key State Partners in Animal
Production Food Safety
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Food Animal Producers
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Veterinarians in private practice
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State public health officials
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FSIS District Managers
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Markets, Dealers, Transporters
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Consumer Representatives
USDA
Producers
Packers
Livestock
Markets
Veterinarians
FDA
State
Partnerships
EPA
Universities
State Public
Health
Extension
State
Agriculture
Consumers
State APFS Partnerships
Vermont
ND
WA
SD
OR
WI
MI
NY
NE
NV
UT
IL IN OH
CO
PA
MO
New Jersey
CA
MS AL
SC
TX
FL
Basic HACCP Compatible
Practices
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Animal or premises identification
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Management and health records
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Proper, documented use of biologics,
antibiotics, and other drugs
 Breeder Culling Plan
 Feed and Water Quality/Safety
Basic HACCP Compatible
Practices
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Good general sanitation
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Animal waste management
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Appropriate dead animal disposal
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Quality Assurance Program
participation
Veterinarians in the
HACCP Era
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Make the connection
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Animal health
Food Safety
Productivity-profitability
Work through HACCP-phobia
Be familiar with HACCP principles
Relate principles to production practices
Veterinarians in the
HACCP Era
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Credible information source
 QAP verification
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Health-safety certification
 Local food safety team
What Do Your
Clients Produce?
Food
Food Safety’s Greatest Need
Information
Productivity
(Value)
Food Safety
Animal
Health
Good Management
Quality Assurance Program
Animal Identification
Production Treatment Records
Proper Drug Use
Feed Quality & Safety
Culling Practices
General Sanitation
Waste Management
Virtual University
College of Animal
Production Food Safety
Summary
Food animal producers who follow
good production practices and are
Quality Assurance Program Certified
will be able to meet food safety
demands in the HACCP era