Prescription Writing

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Transcript Prescription Writing

Chapter 4
Prescription Writing
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
Prescription Writing
A prescription is an order for a specific
medication for a specific patient at a
particular time, with appropriate
instructions for how the patient is to use
the prescribed medication.
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Current Prescription Formatting

Heading



Name, address, and telephone number of the
prescriber
Name, address, age, and telephone number of
the patient
Date of the prescription
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Current Prescription Formatting

Body

The Rx symbol
 Name and dose size or concentration (liquids)
of the drug
 Amount to be dispensed
 Directions to the patient
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Current Prescription Formatting

Closing




Prescriber’s signature
Drug enforcement administration number if
required
Refill instructions
Generic substitution instructions
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Drug Legislation
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The Food and Drug Act of 1906

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Regulated interstate commerce of drugs
The Harrison Narcotic Act of 1914

Provided federal control over narcotics and
required the registration of all practitioners
prescribing narcotics
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Drug Legislation

The Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938
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Prohibited the interstate commerce of drugs
that had not been proven to be safe
The Durham-Humphrey Law of 1952
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Requires that certain types of drugs be sold by
prescription only
 Prescriptions can only be refilled if it is
indicated on the prescription
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Drug Legislation

The Kefauver-Harris Bill of 1962
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Manufacturers were required to prove that
drugs were effective and to follow the strict
rules of drug testing.
Adverse effects that occurred once the drug
was marketed were to be reported to the FDA.
Drug ingredients are to be listed by the generic
name in labeling and advertising and to state
adverse effects, contraindications, and drug
efficacy.
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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Drug Legislation
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Drug Abuse Control Amendments of 1965
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Required accounting for drugs with the
potential for abuse
Controlled Substance Act of 1970
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Divided controlled substances into five
schedules according to their abuse potential
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Controlled Substance
Act of 1970
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Requirements of the Act
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Prescriptions for a controlled substance require
a Drug Enforcement Agency number.
 Schedules II-VI require a written prescription.
 Schedule II prescriptions must be signed in ink,
no refills, phone-ins are emergency only.
 Schedules III-V can be telephoned in and can
have 5 refills over 6 months.
 Several states require “duplicate” or “triplicate”
prescription blanks for Schedule II drugs.
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Scheduled Drugs
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Schedule I
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High potential for abuse
 No accepted medical use in the U.S.
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Scheduled Drugs

Schedule II
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High potential for abuse
 Accepted medical use in the U.S. with or
without severe restrictions
 Abuse may lead to severe psychological or
physical dependence
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Scheduled Drugs
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Schedule III
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Potential for abuse is less than I or II
 Accepted medical use in the U.S.
 Abuse may lead to moderate to low
psychological dependence
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Scheduled Drugs
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Schedule IV
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Low potential for abuse relative to III
 Accepted medical use in the U.S.
 Abuse may lead to limited physical or
psychological dependence relative to III
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Scheduled Drugs
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Schedule V
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Low potential for abuse relative to IV
 Accepted medical use in the U.S.
 Limited physical and psychological
dependence relative to IV
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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