Lessons from Water Accounting for the Energy Statistics Compilers

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Transcript Lessons from Water Accounting for the Energy Statistics Compilers

6th Olso Group Meeting
2-6 May 2011
Canberra
Lessons from Water Accounting
for the Energy Statistics Compilers
Manual
Michael Vardon
Lessons
•
•
•
•
There are many audiences
Do not for get the basics
Emphasise the basics
Output tables are not usually good
for data collection
• Allow for change
Audiences for information:
from data to indicators
Headline indicators
Data users
Indicators on
specific subjects
or industries
Decision makers & wider public
Indicators
Managers
and analysts
Researchers
Environmental
Accounts and other
aggregations
Data items
Information
Audiences
• The audiences vary in terms of
background
– Compilers in statistics offices as well
as other agencies
– Mandate and institutional
arrangements of compilers
– Level of experience of individuals
doing collection
– History and sophistication of agency
Basic statistical process are
important and must be emphasised
Dimensions of data quality*:
Relevance – does the data answer the questions?
Accuracy – how closely does the data represent the real word?
Timeliness – is that data available in time for decision making?
Accessibility – how are the data accessed?
Interpretability – can the data be easily interpreted and used?
Coherence – how does the data relate to other data?
*Source: Statistics Canada:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?lang=eng&catno=12-586-X
Important issues to
emphasise for new compilers
• Institutional arrangements
• Process of development
– (Including identifying and
acknowledging existing data providers
and identifying key questions not
currently addressed by data)
• Importance of data collection
strategy
• Key data collection considerations
– Frame creation and maintainance
– Design of collection instrument
– Data collection is on-going
2004
2001
1998
1995
1992
1989
1986
1983
1980
1977
1974
1971
1968
1965
1962
1959
1956
1953
1950
1947
1944
1941
1938
1935
1932
1929
1926
1923
1920
'000 Hectares
It is not the first time you
produce data that is important
Area Irrigated, Australia - 1920-2005
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
Output tables are not usually
suitable for data collection
Australian experience with business
surveys
• Good form design is essential (see
Dillman)
• Use language and concepts familiar
to those expected to complete form
– Do not expect them to understand the
concepts required to complete energy
balances or energy accounts
Diagrams can be helpful
• In explain concepts in manuals and
could be useful in data collection
and presentation
B. 1. P reci pit ati on
C.1. E vapotranspirati on
D. 3.
B. 2. Inf low from neighboring terri tories
D. 4.
A. 1. S urf ace water
A .1.1. A rt if ici al reservoirs
A .1.2. Lakes
A .1.3. Rivers
A .1.4. Wet lands
A .1.5. S now, ice and gl aciers
D.2.
A .2. Groundwater
D.1.
C.2. 1. Outf low t o nei ghbori ng t errit ori es
Ter r itor y
S oil water
C. 2.2. Outf low t o t he sea
10 Lessons from
Environment Accounting for
Improving Biodiversity
Monitoring
Lesson 1 – Build on the past
Lesson 2 – Must have sound
institutional arrangements
and legal basis
Lesson 3 – Learn by doing
and accept what you have
Lesson 4 – Regular and ongoing beats infrequent and
ad hoc
Lesson 5 – Need to build
capacity
Lesson 6 – Integration of
biodiversity data with
other data is critical
Lesson 7 – Determining
what to measure and how
to measure it
Lesson 8 – Deciding how
much is enough for
effective monitoring
Lesson 9 – Ability to
access and interpret data
Lesson 10 – Defining the
questions and flexibility
Key
Australia – physical water supply and use, 2008-09 (GL)
Wastewater
Water
Reuse water
?
?
79
Sewerage
?
103
?
7
?
27
?
9
Water Supply
?
87
2
?
143
3267
Agriculture
3626
515
?
339
Mining
715
?
228
Manufacturing*
336
334
944
Electricity
44841
12
1594
Other industries
320
44484
Households
172
93
?
722
Inland Water Resources
The Sea
1163
* Note shown is the supply of distributed water and reuse water by mining and manufacturing, 25 GL in total.
33
9336
Need to be able to innovate and
have access to improved
methods
• A hard copy publication is not the end of the
process
• A knowledge base for recording country
practices
• A forum for on-going interaction of technical
experts