Presentation on the Policy Impact in the Grow regions

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Transcript Presentation on the Policy Impact in the Grow regions

POLICY IMPACT IN
THE GROW REGIONS
SOUTH EAST ENGLAND
Regional Economic Strategy
for South East England 2006 –
2016: The European Dimension
Eileen Armstrong, Assistant Director,
Strategy, SEEDA
Building the Regional Economic
Strategy
• 16 engagement events – 2000 attended
• Consultation document – 320 responses
• Draft RES – 180 responses
• Strategic Environmental Assessment /
Sustainability Appraisal
The Challenges
• The global challenge
– Invest in success
• Smart growth
– Invest in potential
• Sustainable prosperity
– Invest in quality of life
Framework
Vision
– By 2016 the South East will be a world class region
achieving sustainable prosperity
Values
– Building on excellence for global competitiveness
– Investing in potential to maximise performance
– Safeguarding quality of life as competitive advantage
Objectives
– Global competitiveness
– Smart growth
– Sustainable prosperity
Measuring Success
Three Headline Targets
– Achieve an average annual increase in GVA per capita
of at least 3%
– Increase productivity per worked by an average 2.4%
annually, from £39,000 in 2005 to at least £50,000 by
2016 (constant prices)
– Reduce the rate of increase in the region’s ecological
footprint (from 6.3 global hectares per capita in 2003,
currently increasing at 1.1% per annum), stabilise it
and seek to reduce it by 2016
The Actions
•
75 actions for the region
•
30 ‘new’ actions
•
Lead responsibilities identified
•
SEEDA to lead on 25 actions
•
8 transformational actions
Transformational Actions
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•
•
•
•
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100% Next Generation Broadband
Science and Innovation Campuses
Regional Infrastructure Fund
Raising Economic Activity Rates
Skills Escalator
Global Leadership in Environmental
Technologies
• Education - Led Regeneration
• Making the Most of 2012
Connecting the Actions
Cross cutting themes
• Europe
• Information and Communications
Technologies
• Culture, Sport and Creative Industries
• Equalities and Diversity
• Rural Areas
The RES Map
The draft EU Regional
Competitiveness Programme 20072013
Principles of the Programme
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pan-regional not spatially targeted, linking instances of good practice
between weak and strong areas
Linked to RES (and CSG; NSRF)
Sustainability is the key theme: sustainable production and
consumption; sustainable communities
Innovation runs through programme as a “golden thread”
Weighting system to apply after projects reach quality threshold to
help achieve specific objectives, eg soft landing for current Objective 2
areas; build-up maximum impact in Assisted Areas; promote intraregional linkages; promote innovative actions
Competitiveness & sustainability applies to all sectors including public/
ngo
Avoid proliferation of projects (small programme: €21m over 7 years)
Avoid proliferation of business support projects (in line with national
drive)
POLICY IMPACT IN
THE GROW REGIONS
ANDALUCIA, SPAIN
Consejería de Medio Ambiente
ANDALUSIAN
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGY
Mr. Andrés Sánchez Hernández
General Secretary of Sustainability for the
Regional Environmental Government of Andalusia
London, November 30th 2006
Consejería de Medio Ambiente
ANDALUSIAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
INDEX
1.- Background
2.- Geographic limits
4.-Concept, premises and scope of development
5.-Characteristics of the document and
operative criteria
6.- Methodology
7.- Contents of the Strategy
8.- Actual accomplishments
9.- Future accomplishments
Consejería de Medio Ambiente
ANDALUSIAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
BACKGROUND
SUMMIT OF RÍO 92
EUROPEAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGY (GOTEMBURG)
REGIONAL AGENDA 21 (2000)
Consejería de Medio Ambiente
ANDALUSIAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
GEOGRAPHIC LIMITS
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Nº of inhabitants = 7.935.074
Surface = 87.591 KM2
Nº of municipalities = 771
Coastline = 836 km
Consejería de Medio Ambiente
ANDALUSIAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
CONCEPT
The Andalusian Sustainable Development Strategy establishes
the basis which allows for a linked growth between economy
and the environment in our Region for the next decades
PREMISES / STARTING PRINCIPLES
 Recognising
sustainable development as a right and duty of all citizens

Incorporating the environment as a component of sectorial and public
administration decisions

Progressive elimination of the production and consuming systems which
put at risk the conservation of natural resources
SCOPE OF DEVELOPMENT

Environmental scope

Social scope

Economic scope
POLICY IMPACT IN
THE GROW REGIONS
MALOPOLSKA, POLAND
GROW INTER-REGIONAL CONFERENCE:
Challenges of achieving sustainability in
High Growth Regions
Aneta Widak
The Marshal Office of the Małopolska Region
Poland
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Challenges of achieving sustainability
in High Growth Regions
Contents:
1. Overview of Małopolska Region
2. The Małopolska Region Development Strategy for 2007-13
3. Małopolska Regional Operational Programme 2007-13
4. Competitiveness and Cohesion
5. Strategic projects
6. GROW post-conference publication
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Małopolska Region in focus
Szre ni
aw
Przem
a
sza
D³ ub nia
ła
Wis
ec
Duna
j
Flag
n
Pr ¹ d
Rudawa
i
k
Emblem
Szreniawa
Wis
Wis
ła
ła
B i aa
³
c
ie
zyc k
c
Du
na
je
je c
Bia³ y Duna
C za rny Duna je c
150 km
pa
a
Bia ³
Duna jec
ra d
Windsor, 30 November 2006
m
kó
wk
P
op
• 3.2 million inhabitants
Ra b
a
a
pa
Ro
• 182 gminas/comunes
i
J. Kl
Ska wa
Population
Ro
a
Wi s³oka
aw
je
Bi a
³a
a
Dun
wsk i e
J.
bc
Do
¿no
Ro
J.
Sk
• 22 poviats/counties
a
aw
Sk
Administrative division
Małopolska Region in focus
Region of Education
• 26 higher education
institutions
• 160 000 students
• 10 000 academic teachers
Jagiellonian University
the oldest Polish university,
established in 1364
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Malopolska Region in focus
Region of Culture and Heritage
• Krakow Philharmonic
• 20 theatres
• 80 art galleries
• 100 museums
• 8 sites registered on the UNESCO
World Cultural Heritage List
(out of 16 in Poland)
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Małopolska Region in focus
Region of Business
Business Environment Centres located in Małopolska Region
(established by international corporations)
9
3
4
2
>4
2-4
1
0
Windsor, 30 November 2006
13
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
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Bayer
Cap Gemini
Ernst & Young
Communication
Factory
Electrolux
Exult
IBM
Indesit
KPMG
Lufthansa
Philip Morris
Google
Małopolska Region in focus
Region of Tourism
• 9 mill. visitors
• Over 1 mill. foreign tourists
• Over 257 hotels
• 75 thousand beds
• Over 1,000 restaurants and clubs only in Krakow
Windsor, 30 November 2006
„MAŁOPOLSKA 2015”
THE MAŁOPOLSKA REGION
FIELD B
DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
FOR 2007-2013
FIELD A
Social development
and standard of
living
Economic
competitiveness
FIELD C
Institutional
potential
THREE FIELDS OF ACTIVITY
Windsor, 30 November 2006
„MAŁOPOLSKA 2015”
Małopolska’s challenges:
1. Competence-related challenges– how to become a partner and a true participant in the
international race of skills and competence?
2. Technological challenges – how to catch up with the most developed and technologically
advanced regions?
3. Social advancement related challenges – how to ensure relative equality and high quality
of public services and standards of living addressing the aspirations of inhabitants?
4. Environmental challenges – how to ensure sustainability of the natural environment and the
high quality of the spatial environment in the face of strong development pressure and
economic aspirations?
5. Symbolical challenges – how to build a modern image of the region, convincing for the
developed world, and at the same time to retain and cherish one's own unique identity?
6. Political challenges – how to ensure the high quality and autonomy of regional development
policy which would permit the implementation of the strategy adopted, how to best involve the
social partners and civil society?
Windsor, 30 November 2006
„MAŁOPOLSKA 2015”
Key principles of the Strategy
I. The principle of partnership
II. The principle of strategic management of regional development
III. The principle of the autonomy of Małopolska's regional development
Strategy compatible with national social and economic development
policy as well as with the EU cohesion policy –
IV. The principle of socially, spatially and environmentally sustainable
development
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Małopolska Regional Operational Programme
2007-2013 /MROP/
(DRAFT, August 2006)
Breakdown
by priority
EU’s public
funds ERDF
Prioritie s
1. Conditions for the development of
knowledge-based society
2. Economy of regional opportunity
3. Tourism and culture industry
4. Technical infrastructure for
regional development
5. Krakow metropolitan area
6.
Intraregional cohesion
7. Environment protection
infrastructure
8. Interregional cooperation
9. Technical support
Priorities 1- 9
Windsor, 30 November 2006
13,77%
158,00
15,48%
177,70
7,49%
86,00
27,79%
319,00
12,29%
141,00
12,11%
139,00
7,67%
88,00
0,87%
10,00
2,53%
29,00
100%
1 147,70
Malopolska Regional Policy
Motto of Malopolska regional development policy:
„As much competitiveness as possible.
As little convergence as necessary.”
Mr. Janusz Sepiol,
Marshal of Malopolska Region
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Małopolska Regional Policy:
competitiveness vs cohesion - balance
100%
90%
80%
70%
66%
54%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
34%
46%
0%
IROP 2004-2006
expenditures on competitiveness
Windsor, 30 November 2006
MROP 2007-13
expenditures on cohesion
Questions about development
 Will we have enough time to support competitiveness focusing our
resources and time on pro-cohesion activities ?
 Does Małopolska and other Polish regions have time to follow
traditional path of development (first infrastructure, and then
innovations)?
 Is it possible to choose a „short-cut” on the way of achieving
competitiveness, skipping cohesion phase?
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Project: Tradition and modernity
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Project: Polish Aviation Museum in Kraków
Windsor, 30 November 2006
GROW Post-conference publication
Cohesion Policy
and Regions
New Perspective
2007-13
Edited by
Jacek Woźniak
Kraków 2006
Regional
Framework
Operations GROW
and SMART (CI
INTERREG)
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Thank you for your attention
www.malopolska.pl
Aneta Widak
The Marshal Office of the Malopolska Region
Department of Regional and Spatial Policy
ul. Basztowa 22, 31-156 Kraków
E-mail: [email protected]
Windsor, 30 November 2006
Małopolska
Invites
www.malopolskie.pl
Windsor, 30 November 2006
POLICY IMPACT IN
THE GROW REGIONS
NOORD-BRABANT, THE NETHERLANDS
Sustainability from margin to mainstream
Towards a sustainable Brabant
Martin Bakker
Policy advisor
30/11/06
Sense of urgency
Innovation
Opportunity
Security
Responsibility
What has Brabant done so far
Brabant Manifesto (1997)
Brabant Elan Programme (1998)
Strategic Agenda (1998)
Telos Institute; Measuring Sustainability
New approaches (the process)
Strategic layer
– Recommending committee
– Debates
Practical layer
– Programme and projects
Citizens
New approaches (the content)
Direction, cohesion and result
– Shifting focus from margin to the mainstream
– Partnerships between established parties
– Concrete projects with measurable results
Eco-efficiency
“cleaner, clever and competitive”
240
emissie index
220
200
180
BRP index
CO2
eco efficiency
160
140
120
100
80
60
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
Examples
Regional government can play an
essential role
Bringing parties together
Promoting a bottom up approach
In line with the objectives of parties involved
Struggling with the scaling up of projects
POLICY IMPACT IN
THE GROW REGIONS
EMILIA-ROMAGNA, ITALY
The sustainability concept of the EmiliaRomagna Region
Competitiveness, environment protection and social inclusion in
Emilia Romagna
Windsor, November 30, 2006
Stefano Marani
Senior advisor for Spatial Economy
& Regional Development Programmes
Some Emilia-Romagna development
descriptors
From being one of the poorest italian regions
(beginning of XXth century), E-R achieved
 a per capita income higher than italian/european
average;
 the best service network for persons and families;
 the highest % of students, attracting young people
from all Italy;
 the location of a number of well
developed/advanced industrial districts in different
sectors (from machinery to biomedicals).
Urban sprawl, a development
“collateral damage”..
1976-2001: aprox. + 100% in
urbanised land, esp. in
Municipalities
from 5.000 to 20.000 inhab.
A governance for
sustainability
the development of towns and regions is
more and more dependent from globalization
of economic and social relationships;
 spatial issues of development can be better
faced through cooperation between different
administrative/government levels
(governance);
 spatial approach overcomes sectoral
approach of development policies, through
cooperation between institutions and sectors
operating on the same territory.
The Regional Territorial Plan
Socio-cultural System
Efficiency
Quality
(ESDP)
Economic
System
Environmental System
Identity
Sustainability concepts, goals
for territorial competitiveness
Quality: building contexts rich in opportunities, wellpreserved landscapes, social and environmental resources
sustainable use
Efficiency: compact settlements to reduce sprawl, social
services cost minimization, cost reduction for
technological/environmental infrastructures
Identity of local communities: belonging sense to the “real
town” beyond administrative boundaries, to cultural and work
relationships of the community, the region, the global
economic and cultural networks
Core strategic issues
Urban centers networking: settlements common planning to manage
“real town”, cost/benefit equitable; networking of utilities infrastructures and
of high level services, re-qualification of the central Emilia and the coast,
recovery of the Apennines and Po river lowlands from its marginal position;
Ecological networks re-construction: “to besiege” urban spaces with
“ecosystemic infrastructure”, renewable energy promotion, water and
materials sustainable use, environmental quality and safety;
Knowledge economy promotion: against competitiveness loss,
promoting change from material to non-material economy, based on
research and innovation, broadband for local systems’ public and private
actors, logistics (vs. transportation infrastructure), continuing education,
culture;
A new welfare: health and advanced services for citizens, targeting in
particular non-self sufficient elderly people, immigrants skills qualification;
multicultural integration.
From a governance perspective,
this means..
presently, no institutional level can manage by itself
development and social cohesion issues: integration in
economic, social and environmental planning strategies
is a must;
institutional partnership need to be promoted and enforced
in a contractual way, with clear commitments among partners
(participation and cooperation);
development actions need a proper territorial scale
(subsidiarity);
evaluation (ex-ante, in itinere, ex-post) must become the
“communication language” of institutional partnership.
The Special Area Programs
SAP are integrated investiment plans,
pubblic and public/private;
 proposed by a local system to solve
problems/catch opportunities;
 limited time and budget;
 subsidiarity principle-based;
 useful to implement local multi-actor
strategies, multi-fund investment, networking
for local resources development;
 aimed at creating administrative, social and
entrepreneurial environement to attract
investments.
The Priority axis 2 of the Ob.
2 SPD
Priority axis 2 deals with territorial dev.;
 aimed at “distance reduction” from the
most advanced regional areas;
 subdivided into 3 territorial measures (Po
river lowlands, Appenines and Central plain
(phasing out);
 different context and objectives;
based on negotaited programming among
institution, social and economic actors;
 “Program Conferences”, to decide project
to be realized and define Local Dev. Plans;
 two 3-years program periods
Rural Dev. Plan - Priority III – integrated
dev. actions
Mountain area
• Rural roads/afforestation
• Water network improvement
• Support to farmers for land conservation
•Rural villages recovery
• Renewable energy
• Hydrogeological risk prevention
Negotiated rural development
plans at province level
Po river plain
•Modernisation of rural infrastructures
• Landscape conservation
•Rural/naturalistic tourism promotion
•Ecological network reconstruction
•Integrated territorial marketing projects for
traditional productions
Plans and programs sustainability is
assessed by..
Eco-industrial development projects, shared among Local
Authorities, for greening local industrial estates;
Accountability to citizens on social and environmental of
choices, through Agenda XXI processes presently and/or
EMS of Local Authorities;
Strategic Impact Assessment of european and
regional/local plans and programs:
– SEA to SPD and Rural dev. Plan;
– ValSAT (TIA-sound) to territorial/spatial planning tools (e.g. urban
dev., environmental management plans, ect.)
thank you for your attention!