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MEXICO - FLORIDA
www.naftamx.org/fl.html
www.naftamexico.org/fl.html
September 2006
Mexico today

Mexico is a middle-income country with the world's eleventh-largest population.

Mexico's income per capita is larger than all other major economies in the region
(7,100 dollars in 2005).

After Brazil, Mexico is the second-largest market in Latin America by population
(106.385 millions in 2005)

The average age of the population is 24.7 (2005) and 30% is aged 14 years or
under.

This large proportion of young people will represent a pool of effective consumers
in the long term.

Mexico is classed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a "low mortality
developing country".

The rate of population growth has slowed from more than 3% (per year) in the 70s
to a 1.26% in 2005.

Mexico is the 10th economy in the world.

In terms of territory is the 14th (equals to France, Spain, Germany, Italy and UK all
together)
Mexico’s evolution is evident
1987
2005
200
769
1900
7229
Inflation
159
3.3
Annual %
Interest Rate
120
9.2
Annual %
Exports
28
214
Billions of US dollars
Imports
19
221
Billions of US dollars
Trade balance
7.2
-7.6
Billions of US dollars
16.1
0.2
Gdp
Gdp per capita
Public deficit
Billions of US dollars
US dollars
% of Gdp
Nominal wages are growing and real wages are stable.
This supports the strengthening of the domestic market
Avarage daily base salary of
Workers insured at IMSS
Real wages in the
manufacturing sector
(2002-2006, US Dollars)
10.00%
July, 2006
20.00
(Annual growth, three-month moving
average)
May, 2006
8.00%
19.00
18.39
6.00%
18.00
4.00%
17.00
2.00%
16.00
0.82%
0.00%
15.00
-2.00%
Source: INEGI
2006/04
2005/11
2005/06
2005/01 p/
2004/08
2004/03
2003/10
2003/05
2002/12
2002/07
2002/02
2001/09
2001/04
2000/11
2000/06
2000/01
2006/03
2005/10
2005/05
2004/12
2004/07
2004/02
2003/09
2003/04
2002/11
2002/06
2002/01
14.00
Economic growth and positive expectations translated into a
stronger labor market
Jobs Creation
Workers insured at IMSS
(Monthly, Thousand of jobs)
June, 2006
(Millon workers)
June, 2006
13.9
790
772
13.70
13.7
855
747
657
645
590
574
13.5
13.3
531
488
447
13.1
413
12.9
316
305
276
12.7
283
249
12.5
176
12.3
Source: INEGI
2006/06
2006/05
2006/04
2006/03
2006/02
2006/01
2005/12
2005/11
2005/10
2005/09
2005/08
2005/07
2005/06
2005/05
2005/04
2005/03
2005/02
2005/01
2006/05
2006/01
2005/09
2005/05
2005/01
2004/09
2004/05
2004/01
2003/09
2003/05
2003/01
12.1
For the first time in 35 years inflation in Mexico was less than in
the U.S.
15
13
Consumer Price Index (CPI) and Core Inflation
(annual % change)
Core Inflation
11
9
CPI Inflation
7
5
3.33
3.12
Nov-05
Sep-05
Jul-05
May-05
Mar-05
Jan-05
Nov-04
Sep-04
Jul-04
May-04
Mar-04
Jan-04
Nov-03
Sep-03
Jul-03
May-03
Mar-03
Jan-03
Nov-02
Sep-02
Jul-02
May-02
Mar-02
Jan-02
Nov-01
Sep-01
Jul-01
May-01
Mar-01
Jan-01
Nov-00
Sep-00
Jul-00
May-00
Mar-00
Jan-00
3
Upper limit of the
Inflation target (4%)
December
2005
The stock market recovered strongly due to good expectations
of the economic performance in Mexico and the United States
Mexicos's stock market leading
index - IPyC
23,000
August 23, 2006
21,000
20,742.44
Returns in the Mexican
stock market
19,000
(nominal and in USD)
17,000
Period
15,000
13,000
11,000
%
%
MXP
USD
Cumulative JanuaryDecember 2004 return
46.5
45.6
Cumulative JanuaryDecember 2005 return
36.7
42.3
Cumulative July 2006
return
12.1
10.2
9,000
7,000
Source: Banco de Mexico
30/05/2006
4/1/2006
16/08/2005
30/03/2005
8/11/2004
21/06/2004
29/01/2004
5/9/2003
16/04/2003
21/11/2002
3/7/2002
8/2/2002
17/09/2001
5,000
Source: Nafta with data from BMV
Mexico‘s GDP grew 4.7% in the second quarter of 2006,
reaching twelve consecutive quarters of growth

As a result of sound economic policies, the economy is strong and stable

Better economic fundamentals, a promising international environment, and more
ambitious government programs have contributed to stronger growth and
employment
Quarterly Gross Domestic Product
(Real annual growth)
5.5
4.8
4.7
4.5
3.6 3.7
2.4
1.9
1.9
1.7
3.3 3.4
2.1
2
2.7
2.4
2006 GDP growth by economic
sector
(2nd Quarter % change)
Sector
%
Total
4.7
Agriculture
7.6
Industry
3.9
Services
4.8
1.0
0.2
-0.1
-1.3-1.4
2006/02
2006/01
2005/04
2005/03
2005/02
2005/01
2004/04
2004/03
2004/02
2004/01
2003/04
2003/03
2003/02
2003/01 p/
2002/04
2002/03
2002/02
2002/01
2001/04
2001/03
2001/02
2001/01
-2.3
Source: INEGI
Mexico’s country risk is low and stable due to its
differentiation from other emerging markets
Risk indicators for emerging markets
(EMBI+ JP Morgan, base points )
Levels at August 18, 2006
Levels at August 18, 2005
Argentina
Argentina
426
Brasil
Brasil
406
Mexico
100
Source: JP Morgan
200
216
Mexico
150
0
314
300
400
500
111
0
100
200
300
400
Automotive Industry: Geographic Location
CHIHUAHUA
G. PALACIO
KENWORTH MEXICALI
(TRUCKS)
SONORA
LINAMAR
(ENGINES)
Clearly distinguish
CHIHUAHUA
TIJUANA TOYOTA
(PICK-UP BOXES
3 clusters in Mexico
RAMOS
G.M.
ARIZPE (PC & UV)
COAHUILA
OF TRUCKS)
GARCIA
NAVISTAR (TRUCKS)
NUEVO
LEON
DURANGO
FORD HERMOSILLO
(PC)
S.L.P.
SCANIA
(TRUCKS)
TAMPS.
ZACATECAS
CHRYSLER SALTILLO
(ENGINES & UV)
NISSAN
AGS.
(PC & ENGINES)
HONDA (PC)
CUAUTITLAN D.F.
S.L.P.
AGS.
FORD
(PC & UV)
GTO.QRO.
YUCATAN
HIDALGO
JALISCO
GUADALAJARA
COLIMA
MEX.
MICHOACAN
TLAX.
CAMPECHE
MOR.
PUEBLA
G.M. SILAO
(UV)
TOLUCA
G.M. (ENGINES)
TABASCO
GUERRERO
OAXACA
CHRYSLER (PC & UV) TOLUCA
CHIAPAS
M.BENZ (PC & UV) SANTIAGO
BMW (PC) TOLUCA
MASA (TRUCKS) TULTITLAN
TOLUCA
VOLVO (TRUCKS)
PUEBLA
CIVAC
NISSAN
(PC & UV)
V.W.
(PC & ENGINES)
Electronic Industry location ……
(700 + companies)
Tijuana
 SANYO
 SONY
 HITACHI
 MATSUSHITA
 JVC
 SAMSUNG
 PIONNER
 MITSUBISHI
 SHARP
 SANYO ELECTRODOMÉSTICOS
 PHILIPS
 CASIO
 KODAK
 CANON
 KIOCERA
 INTERNACIONAL RECTIFIER
Aguascalientes
 WHITE
 WESTINGHOUSE
 MEX*
 TEXAS INTS.
 XEROX
 SIEMENS
Guadalajara
I.B.M

 H.P.
 NEC
 LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES
 MOTOROLA
 KODAK
 CUMEX
 SIEMENS
 SOLECTRON DE MEXICO
 FLEXTRONICS
 JABIL CIRCUIT
 MTI ELECTRONICS
 SCI SANMINA
Mexicali
Juárez
Chihuahua
 SONY
TOSHIBA

(SLRC)  MOTOROLA  PHILIPS
 DAEWOO
 ALTEL
 THOMSON
 MITSUBISHI
 KIOCERA
 KENWOOD
 GOLDSTAR
 JABIL
 ELECTROLUX
Saltillo
 ACER
 MABE
 ELAMEX
 HAMILTON
 PLEXUS
BEACH*
Torreón
 THOMSON
San Luis Potosí
 MABE GE
 MABE SANYO
Querétaro
 VISTAR
 VITROMATIC (2)
Reynosa
 DELCO (Automotriz)
 PHILIPS
 SONY
 MATSUSHITA (Automotriz)
 VITROMATIC
 NOKIA
 LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES
 FUJITSU (Automotriz)
 CONDURA (Automotriz)
 DELNOSA (Automotriz)
Monterrey
 PIONNER
 DANFOSS COMPRESSORS
 VITROMATIC (3)
 MABE (2)
 KODAK
 NIPPON DENSO (Automotriz)
 AXA YAZAKI (Automotriz)
Cuernavaca
 NEC
Querétaro
 CLARION
Estado de Mexico
 DAEWOO
 BLACK & DECKER  MABE
 BRAUN
 MABE (2)
 ELECTROLUX
 SINGER
 SUNBEAM
 SIEMENS
 KOBLENZ
 ERICSSON
 ALCATEL/INDETEL
 AMP
Puebla
 GESTAR
 SINGER
 VITROMATIC
 AUDIO & VIDEO
 ELECTRODOMESTICS
 COMPUTERS
 TELECOMUNICATIONS
 OTHERS
Estado de México
 PANASONIC
 ELECTROLUX
 FILTER QUEEN
 HOOVER
 IMAN
 KOBLENZ
 MABE
 PHILIPS
 SUNBEAM
 OLIVETTI
 OLIMPIA
Home Appliances Industry
Location ...(32 + Companies)
Baja California
Chihuahua
Coahuila
Nuevo León
Tamaulipas
San Luis Potosí
Guanajuato
Querétaro
Jalisco
Edo. de México
Distrito Federal
Tlaxcala
Puebla
Merrytech
G.S.E.B
TIMCO
Ventiladores
Copacabana
Transformation responds to a strategy
Mexico’s network of FTAs is one of the largest in the world
Mexico is among world's most open economies
Sweden
Norway
Canada
Finland
Denmark
12 FTAs
United
States
Iceland
United
Kingdom
20 BITs
Netherlands
Germany
Cuba
6 CEAs
Honduras
Ireland
Liechtenstein
Belgium
Nicaragua
Czech Rep.
Austria
Luxembourg
Switzerland
Guatemala
Portugal
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Spain
Venezuela
France
Italy
Greece
Colombia
Mercosur
Australia
South
Korea
Peru
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Uruguay
Argentina
Israel
Japan
Florida’s Exports to Mexico
1993-2006*
(Billions of US Dollars)
3
2.0
2
1.7
1.8
1.5
2
1.1
1
1.8
1.7
0.8
0.8
1.1
1.1
0.9
0.7
0.6
1
0
1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 '05 2006**
Source: US Census, WISER and SE-NAFTA Series.
* 2000-2006, NAICS series. ** 2006 Jan-Jun
Florida’s Exports to Mexico by Sector (NAICS)
2005
Othe rs
29%
Machine ry, Exce pt
Ele ctr
9%
Ele ctrical
Equipme nt, Ap
9%
Transportation
Equipme nt
10%
Che micals
11%
Source: US Census, WISER and SE-NAFTA Series.
Compute r And
Ele ctronic
32%
Florida’s Exports to Mexico – 2005
(Millions of US Dollars)
Transmission Appr Incorporating Reception Apparats
144.9
Fertilizers, Exports Only Incl Other Crude Matls
104.2
90.6
Elect Appr F Prtct To Elect Circt Nov 1000 V Nesoi
Parts & Accessories For Adp Machines & Units
89.5
Motorboats, Other Than Outboard Motorboats
71.2
Automatic Data Processing Storage Units, N.E.S.O.I
63.6
Gas Turbine Parts Nesoi
53.1
47.2
Pts,Ex Antenna,For Trnsmssn,Rdr,Radio,Tv,Etc Nesoi
Automatic Data Processing Units, N.E.S.O.I.
45.4
Ferrous Waste & Scrap Nesoi
43.4
Digital Monolithic Integrated Circuits
32.7
Video Games Used W Tv Rceivr & Pts And Accessories
28.2
0
20
Source: US Census, WISER and SE-NAFTA Series.
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
Florida’s Opportunities in Mexico
Millions of US Dollars
Sector
Florida’s Total
Exports
Florida’s Exports Mexico Imports
to Mexico
from U.S.
Total
33,377
2,025
120,049
54%
221,249
Computer And Electronic Prod.
9,729
662
23,298
47%
50,065
Transportation Equipment
5,652
194
14,455
90%
16,073
Machinery, Except Electrical
3,588
186
11,494
35%
33,082
Chemicals
3,489
215
12,899
59%
21,924
Miscellaneous Manufactured
1,736
106
2,727
67%
4,096
Electrical Equipment, Appliances
1,205
188
8,071
86%
9,360
Food And Kindred Prod.
1,100
29
5,641
64%
8,873
Fabricated Metal Prod.
845
52
5,059
50%
10,073
Paper
806
74
3,206
62%
5,181
Agricultural Products
633
2
3,590
74%
4,869
Plastics And Rubber Prod.
520
33
5,817
78%
7,477
Textiles and Fabrics
509
27
3,067
60%
5,141
Source: Ministry of Economy with data from WISER and USDOC
Mexico Total
Imports
Share
.
Incentives to promote the competitiveness
Electronics*
Shoe & Leather*
SME Financing
Consulting
Training, R&D
Automotive*
Software*
Aerospace
Prosec
Clusters
Agriculture
Fiscal
Incentives
ITA +
Tourism
Prosoft
Business
Acelerator
Program
Commerce
Design
Centers
Textile
Construction
OPIC
Eximbank
Nafin
Bancomext
Fiscal
Incentives
Maquiladora*
Chemical
Many Companies are Taking Advantage of the Mexican
Strategy to Attract Businesses…
We offer:
Elements to ease key imports for the industry:
ITA PLUS
PROSEC
RULE 8th
Elements of Government support
30% TAX Credit on Engineering design, R&D
Reduced Income tax on Maquiladoras
Immediate Deduction of Assets
Grants to help location on designated areas
Training incentives Federal-State
Federal-State mixed funds on technology based projects (grants)
University and Research Centers Involvement
Working closer to understand industry needs
Federal Funds for Research Centers
Mexico: a World of Economic Opportunity
Tijuana
Population: 750,000
Key Industries: beverages, processed
foods, metalworking, radio and television
manufacture, electrical machinery
Ciudad Juárez
Population: 800,000
Key Industries: electrical machinery, transport equipment, meat,
electronics, dairy products
Chihuahua
Population: 650,000
Key Industries: electrical machinery,
automotive, meat, electronics, dairy products,
timber
Hermosillo
Population: 600,000
Key Industries: automotive, meat,
cement and derivatives, electrical
machinery
Torreón
Population: 880,000
Key Industries: automotive, bricks, clay,
refractory, general machinery, cement and
derivatives
Monterrey
Population: 3 million
Key Industries: oil refining, iron and steel,
electrical machinery, glass and derivatives,
breweries, meat products, cement,
banking
Culiacán
Population: 600,000
Key Industries: food processing, cereal
milling, sugar, beverages, edible oils
and fats
Tampico-Madero-Altamira
Veracruz
Population: 340,000
Key Industries: chemical, industrial
machinery, electronic & electrical
equipment, oil and refinery,
agriculture, cattle, fishing
Aguascalientes
Population: 500,000
Key Industries: electronics, automotive,
dairy, textiles, carpets
Population: 450,000
Key Industries:
petrochemicals, refining, basic
chemicals, iron and steel,
sugar, beef, processed foods,
tourism, transportation
services (maritime)
León
Population: 1 million
Key Industries: refining, footwear, leather and
tanning, bakery goods, beverages
Mérida
Population: 600,000
Key Industries: beverages, edible oils and
fats, processed foods, cement and
derivatives, plastic products
Guadalajara
Population: 4 million
Key Industries: high-technology, edible
oils and fats, plastic products,
chemicals, dairy products, processed
foods, textiles, footwear
Toluca
Population: 850,000
Key Industries: automotive, plastics,
paper and cellulose, chemical
derivatives, basic chemicals
Mexico City
San Luis Potosí
Population: 20 million
Key Industries: retail, financial
services, food, automotive, plastic
products, paper and cellulose,
chemical derivatives, basic
chemicals
Population: 670,000
Key Industries: iron and steel,
non-ferrous metallurgy, tobacco
products, electrical machinery,
automotive, livestock
Querétaro
Source: SE-NAFTA.
Population: 460,000
Key Industries: automotive, paper
and cellulose, synthetic fibers,
general machinery, electrical
machinery, processed foods, dairy
products
Puebla
Population: 1.5 million
Key Industries: automotive,
textiles, iron and steel, bottled
water, chemicals, meat processing
CONTACT POINT
DR. HÉCTOR MÁRQUEZ
1911 PENSYLVANIA AVE. 8TH FLOOR
WASHINGTON, DC, 20006.
TEL. (202)728-1776
FAX
E-MAIL
(202)728-1712
[email protected]
Web page: http://www.economia.gob.mx