PLoS, open access, new journals

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Transcript PLoS, open access, new journals

Committed to making the world’s
scientific and medical literature
a public resource
Peter Binfield, Managing Editor of PLoS ONE
[email protected]
Outline
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Open Access
PLoS Publications
PLoS ONE and CoML
PLoS and a Marine Science ‘Hub’
What is open access?
• Free, immediate access
• Deposition in a digital public
archive
• Unrestricted reuse
– (the most powerful element)
• Bethesda definition, 2003
We believe in the power of an
open network of literature & data
Document
Data
…but if you allow some content
to be ‘closed’, what does this do…
Document
Data
…but if you allow some content
to be ‘closed’, what does this do…
Document
Data
…not an encouraging scenario.
Document
Data
Why should CoML care about OA?
• Publishing in ‘closed access’ journals
severely hampers your reach
– most Western researchers in a major institution will be
able to read your output…
– but what about the developing world? And the public?
And policy makers? And small institutions?
• You may be able to pay to ‘buy the rights’
to make your articles free…
– but even then, free access is not as good as open
access
– and you risk paying 3 times for the privilege (once to
submit (many journals have page charges), once to
subscribe to the journal (to read your literature), and
once more to buy the right to make it ‘free’.
• The usability of your literature and research
will be dramatically reduced
– People will be discouraged (or prevented) from re-using
it, re-analysing it, data mining it etc
The Public Library of Science
– our publishing strategy
• Establish high quality journals
– put PLoS and open access on the map
• Build a more extensive OA publishing
operation
– an open access home for every paper
• Make the literature more useful
– to scientists and the public
PLoS Biology
October, 2003
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PLoS Medicine
October, 2004
Professional/ academic editors
Very selective
Extensive media coverage
High impact – usage and citations
PLoS ‘Community Journals’
June-September, 2005
October, 2007
• Community-run
• Intermediate rejection rate – still
select for ‘significance’
• Akin to the majority of the 25,000
journals in the world
PLoS ONE
December 2006
The Future of Academic Publishing?
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Community run (Ed Board of 750)
High volume (2,700 papers in 2008)
Highly efficient publishing process
Online only, and web 2.0 enabled (rating,
notes, comments)
Fast, transparent, ‘hassle free’
Groundbreaking and unlike anything else
that came before
Constantly experimenting and innovating
Approx doubling in volume every year
PLoS ONE (www.plosone.org)
• Inclusive scope
– breadth of coverage (all of science)
– range of impact
• Objective peer review, rapid service
– focus on technical rigor, not subjective ‘impact’
– growing submissions
• Organization and assessment after
publication
– article-level metrics
– community activity and debate
• Cost-effective
– modest publication fees ($1, 300) cover all costs
PLoS ONE
December 2006
The Future of Academic Publishing?
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Very flexible approach to your needs
Papers can be of any length
Papers can include full colour throughout
Papers can include extensive ancillary
material (datasets, excel sheets,
multimedia videos, audio, translations etc)
• Happy to accommodate your requirements
re. data deposition etc
• Fully archived in industry standard
locations
• Be aware – We have no Impact Factor
PLoS & CoML - levels of interaction
• Publication of individual papers
– in any of our journals
• Publication of ‘Collections’ (aka
‘Special Issues’) in PLoS ONE
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Regional Synthesis group
ChEss
NaGiSA
Possibly HMAP, GoMA, Transparent Ocean etc
• Creation of a Marine Sciences ‘Hub’
– By end year
PLoS & CoML - levels of interaction
• Publication of individual papers
– in any of our journals
• Publication of ‘Collections’ (aka
‘Special Issues’) in PLoS ONE
–
–
–
–
Regional Synthesis group
ChEss
NaGiSA
Possibly HMAP, GoMA, Transparent Ocean
• Creation of a Marine Sciences ‘Hub’
– By end year
Collections
• Akin to a ‘Special Issue’ in a journal
• Approx 5 – 40 papers on a single topic
• ‘Aggregated’ together into a single location under
a single ‘banner’.
• Papers can appear in multiple Collections
• Content can be vetted / pre-approved by CoML
• Follows a PLoS ONE workflow and the publication
decision is owned by PLoS ONE
• Published in PLoS ONE (i.e. that is the citation
location and the final functionality)
• Can be built up over time, or published all at once
• Collections can contain overview articles
Making Collections more effective
• Encourage deposition of datasets
– PLoS
– relevant community databases
• Link to relevant datasets and related
views
– relevant community databases
– OBIS
– Google Earth
• New functionality coming
– inline multimedia files
– expert tagging of articles
– Article Level Metrics information
PLoS & CoML – levels of interaction
• Publication of individual papers
– in any of our journals
• Publication of ‘Collections’ (aka
‘Special Issues’) in PLoS ONE
–
–
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–
Regional Synthesis group
ChEss
NaGiSA
Possibly HMAP, GoMA, Transparent Ocean
• Creation of a Marine Sciences ‘Hub’
– By end year
PLoS Hubs – beyond Collections
“The Marine Sciences Hub”
• For Marine Science (encompassing all of
CoML)
• Conceptually more akin to a journal
• Unlimited in size
• Better browsing and searching functionality
• Can contain ‘informational’ content
• Will have the ability to publish editorials /
commentaries
• Will use an editorial board for community
ownership and content decisions
• Part of an ongoing development path, which
will add a lot of new features going forwards
Next steps for PLoS and CoML
• PLoS would like you to consider us as
your publication venue for all CoML
output (regardless of Collections)
• We are seeking discussions with the
remaining CoML groups, to commit to
PLoS Collections
• We are working towards a Marine
Sciences Hub by end of year
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If you are interested in having
a PLoS Collection for your group
email me at:
[email protected]