STATE OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN TANZANIA

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Transcript STATE OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN TANZANIA

BEYOND AGRICULTURE – BUILDING LINKAGES
FOR THE POOR
Presented by Y.Kayandabila
Ministry of Agriculture Food Security and Cooperatives
25th November 2013
Outline
• Introduction
• Sector Performance
• Opportunities for Small Scale Rural Producers
in Accessing Inputs
• Government Agricultural Sector Initiatives
• What Needs to be done to ensure
Sustainability
• Conclusion
Introduction
•
•
Agricultural Sector remains the Foundation of the Economy.
It accounts for:
• 24.7 per cent of the GDP
• About 20 percent of traditional export earnings
• Provides 95 percent of food requirement
• Employs 75 per cent of the population
• Control of inflation, since food contributes about 55.9% of
the inflation basket
• Highest multiplier effect in the economy
…..Critical to Reducing Poverty
Real GDP breakdown by sector
Percent
Workforce breakdown by sector
Percent, 2009
100% =
TZS 4.1 tril.
Fishing
6
Hunting
8
And forestry
15
Livestock
Other
100%
Others
90%
80%
Services
Services
70%
100% = 20.3 million
employed
Services
20
Industry
5
60%
50%
Industry
40%
20%
72
Industry
30%
Crops
Agriculture
75
Agriculture
Agriculture
10%
0%
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
The sector is critical to reducing poverty
2012
Out of
which
56% are
women
Sector performance...
20
02
20
03
20
04
20
05
20
06
20
07
20
08
20
09
20
10
20
11
20
12
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Sector Growth
Economic Growth
The sector has maintained a steady growth rate of over
4% which is above population growth of 2.8%
Opportunities for Small-Scale rural
Producers in accessing inputs
• Existence of Supportive Sectoral, Macro Policies and
Programs
– NAP, 2013 envisage creating modern, commercial,
highly productive and profitable agric sector
– ASDP
– AGITF
– Tax and non tax incentives
– Establishment of Agric Window TIB/ Agric Bank
Opportunities for Small-Scale rural
Producers in accessing inputs
– Input Subsidy Program (National Agricultural Input
Voucher System -NAIVS and Credit systems)
– PPP – ASA and Suba Agro Trading & Eng. Co Ltd –
produce seeds in Mbozi seed farm
– Involves LGAs to produce Quality Declared Seeds
……Input accessibility
• In year 2012/2013
Seed
Fertilizer
DEMAND-MT.
60,000
452,202
AVAILABILITY-MT
30,443
240,350
GAP
29,557
211,852
49%
47%
%
Investment in Seeds
The Trend of Investment in Seeds Production
9,000.00
VALUES IN TSH (M) AND PRODUCTION IN TONS
8,000.00
7,000.00
6,000.00
5,000.00
PRODUCTIO
N
4,000.00
3,000.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
2006/2007
2007/2008
2008/2009
YEARS
2009/2010
2010/2011
Food Self Sufficiency Ratio
120
115
110
105
100
95
90
2009/2010
2010/2011
2011/2012
2012/2013
Irrigation infrastructure
Land potential
i.
Endowed with 44 million hectares of arable
land, 10.8 million hectares, equivalent to 24
percent, is under crop production.
Irrigation
i Mitigates vagaries of weather;
ii Yield is more than 2-3 times
compared to rain-fed;
Irrigation Potential
i.
Irrigation potential estimated to be 29.4
million ha, out of which 2.3 million ha of high
potential, 4.8million ha medium potential and
22.3 million ha of low potential suitable for
irrigation.
ii.
450,392 is used about 1.53%
iii.
about 5% of households use irrigation
facilities
11
Irrigation Initiatives
 The MAFC intends to increase area under irrigation to
reach 1 million hectares by 2015.
 Under BRN, it is planned to increase area under irrigation
by 389,000 hectares which will add up to the current
450,392 hectares under irrigation.
 Development of 40 irrigation schemes with capacity of
irrigating 28,114 hectares is in progress under the
planned activities in 2013/14.
 Further development of irrigation infrastructure is
implemented under various initiatives including
Government, JICA, WB, USAID-Feed the Future and
others to support smallholder farmers.
……..91% of agriculture land in use is driven by smallholders farmers
44 million hectares
Arable land
14 million hectares
Smallholders
▪ Smallholders average farm
size is 0.2 to 2 hectares
▪ The main source of income
is sales of food crops
1.5 million hectares
Commercial farming
▪ There are 1,006 large scale
farms in Tanzania with the
average size of 1,107
hectares
Investment in Infrastructure
• Investment in rural infrastructure (rural roads,
water supply, transportation, processing
facilities, communication and electrification.
• SAGCOT, and BRN initiatives 275 Collective
Warehouse based market scheme.
• Focus on improving Warehouse Receipt System
for enhanced market access to be linked with
Commodity Exchange (TCX)
Investment in Mechanization
•
Tractors Scheme
• Increased areas under crop production
• Reduced drudgery of agriculture hence increased more participation
of youths in agriculture undertaking
• The number of tractors imported through tractor scheme of AGITF
200
150
100
50
0
2005/2006
2006/2007
2007/2008
2008/2009
2009/2010
Empowerment through Producer
Organization Farmers Group
• Associations, Cooperatives and groups are key
stakeholders for the sector and inclusive growth
• Avenue for cost reduction of various services like
delivery of loan, inputs, extension services and
market information
• Initiative to increased cooperative movement include
the amendment of cooperative law and preparation
of Cooperative Development Strategy
Cooperative Societies
12000
10000
9397
8000
6000
7542
5344
4000
2000
0
2008
9769
9964
Technological Advancement for increased Productivity
• Central to accelerating agricultural growth
• Important for release of new varieties and breeders
seeds
Years
Variety
released
Breeders
Seeds
2011/2012
2012/2013
16
22
29.2
17.4
Seed
Supplied
(MT)
28,770.2
30,403.9
Developed Human Capital in the sector
• Target to have 1 extension officer in every
village which total to 15,082 extension officers
• Currently about 7,974 extension officers
equivalent to 53% of the target
• In collaboration with LGAs a total of 2,546
extension officers were recruited in March,
2013.
Developed Human Capital in the sector
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0
2005/2006
2006/07
2007/2008
2008/2009
2009/2010
2010/2011
2011/2012
What Needs to be Done
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implement the BRN initiative
Promote Research and Development
Scale up input subsidies
Promoting Irrigation farming
Promoting mechanization in agriculture
Reduce Pre and Post Harvest losses
Emphasis on Rural Employment and Decent work
Enhance Marketing and Value addition
Sustainable Land Use Planning and Water Resources
Conclusion
• Science and Innovation have always been
the key forces behind agricultural growth in
particular and economic transformation in
general.
• More specifically, the ability to add value to
agricultural produce via the application of
scientific knowledge to entrepreneurial
activities stands out as one of the most
important lessons of Economic History.
THANK YOU FOR LISTENING
ASANTE SANA