POWER - India Energy Forum

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Transcript POWER - India Energy Forum

OPTIMISING GENERATION
SUNIL PARWANI
General Manager (Marketing)
Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd.
New Delhi
17TH India Power Summit on
‘Optimising Power Availability: Action Plan for
Next Decade’
India Energy Forum
November 14, 2014 at New Delhi
POWER FOR NATION’S GROWTH
Power – The key driver for a Nation’s Economic Growth
Growth
in Power
Generating
Capacity
• For the country to grow at
accelerated rate, proportionate
growth of Power Sector is
necessitated
• With the govt.’s focus on
Manufacturing Sector as the
driver of growth, Power Sector
assumes high Importance
Industry
Growth
GDP
Growth
• Human Development Index
(HDI) found to be directly
linked to per capita
consumption
2
POWER AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Magnified effect of increase in Energy Consumption on Human Development
UK
Japan
USA
HDI
Germany
China
India
Niger
 Human Development Index (HDI) found to be
directly correlated to per capital electricity
consumption
 For countries like India, lying at low level of
development, even a small increase in electricity
use is associated with large increase in HDI
Energy Consumption: Giga Joules per capita per year
Source: UNDP: Human Development Index, 2010
3
POWER POSITION IN INDIA
Fast Growth, but still substantial development needed in power sector
 10th largest economy in the world by nominal GDP; 3rd largest by GDP in PPP terms
 Second fastest growing economy
 Accounts for 4.1% of world’s energy consumption
 4th largest energy consumer ; fast moving to reach 3rd position by 2025

Energy demand in India will continue to grow rapidly over the next couple of
decades due to:
 Rapid rate of growth
 High urbanization levels
 An aspiring and growing middle class and a generally modernizing society
4
POWER: PROJECTIONS AND OBJECTIVES
Projections suggest a strong need to augment the capacity
Projected Installed Capacity (GW)
Acc. To
World Energy
Outlook, 2013
 Power needs to be:
 Environmentally
sustainable, without
compromising on
economic and social
development.
 Affordable
 Equitably accessible to
all sections of society.
As on
July
2014
Acc. To
Integrated Energy
Policy, 2006
Projected Energy Demand (BU)
FY
2013-14
Acc. To
World Energy
Scenario,
2050
Acc. To
World
Energy
Outlook,
2013
5
CAPACITY ADDITION ACHIEVEMENTS
Impressive growth seen in recent Years... But still a long way to go ...
Electricity Consumption per
capita per year (kWh), 2011
Electricity Deficit (MU) 2013-14
42,428
4.2%
Peak Deficit (MW) 2013-14
6,103
4.5%
At about 1/3rd
Levels of World
Average
Source: IEA Key World Energy Statistics 2013; * CEA 2014; LGBR
2014-15
Power shortage currently costs India a GDP
loss of USD 68 Bn (~0.4 % of GDP)
6
ISSUES IN POWER SECTOR
Unfavourable environment for all stakeholders…
Delay in receipt of
environmental and
other clearances
Funds
constraints
Factors
impacting
growth
Fuel
availability
Land
acquisition
7
Energy Security
Need to balance the ‘Energy Trilemma’
Diversity in
Sources of
Energy
Creating a Resilient
System
Reduced
Dependence on
Imports
ENERGY
EQUITY
ENERGY
SECURITY
Robust
Infrastructure
Redundancy
ENVIRONMENTAL
SUSTAINABILITY
8
NEED FOR FOCUS ON AVAILABLE CAPACITY
Improving available power at lowest price
1.4 1.5
MW
Installed Capacity
1.0
MW
Available Power
9
SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE OF BHEL SETS IN INDIAN MARKET
BHEL manufactured sets clocked higher PLF than national avg.

35 coal based sets register PLF over 90%

79 coal based sets achieved PLF between
80-90%

166 coal based sets clocked uninterrupted
operation for more than 90 days – testimony
to BHEL’s product excellence

178 coal based sets achieved an operational
availability (OA) of higher than 90%

11 of 13 power station awarded ‘National
Awards for Meritorious Performance’ by MoP,
GoI, during 2012-13 are completely or partly
equipped with BHEL make sets
10
DEVELOPING NEW TECHNOLOGIES
Constantly innovating to cater future demands
Development of Fuel Flexible Supercritical Boilers
New Boiler design capable of firing both extremes - from 100% domestic coal
to 100% imported coal to effectively deal with uncertainties over availability of
domestic and imported coals
Development of Ultra Supercritical (USC) power plants
To improve steam parameters, thereby improving efficiency and heat rates,
resulting in reduced coal demands
Higher parameters provided for NTPC’s North Karanpura Project - country’s first
Super-critical power project with Air Cooled Condenser , and is taking strides
towards providing further improvements in parameters in the future
11
Advanced Ultra Super Critical Power Plant Project
Constantly innovating to cater future demands
BHEL, NTPC and IGCAR working together in a national consortium for indigenous development
and commissioning of 800 MW Advanced Ultra Super Critical (AUSC) Power Plant in India
Targeted operational parameters :
• 7100 Celsius, 310 Bar, Plant efficiency 46% leading to Reduction in Coal consumption and CO 2 emission
by 12% as compared to Super Critical plants
Project planned in two phase :
• R&D phase for Two and Half years and Manufacturing and Commissioning in next four and half years
Challenges involved are Development of New Alloy Materials, Manufacturing Technologies :
• Casting/ forging/ machining and welding, Assembly, Testing procedures and site commissioning
R&D Project cost estimated at Rs. 1554 Crs:
• GOI funding of Rs. 1100 Crs and balance 454 Crs by BHEL and IGCAR (BHEL : 220 Crs and IGCAR : 234
Crs)
Union Budget 2014 Speech:
• Hon’ble Minister of Finance has indicated allocation of Rs. 100 Crs for 2014-’15 for this R&D project
12
WORLD CLASS PERFORMANCE
Demonstrating superior performance than international benchmarks
Performance of 400-599 MW Sets*
84.73%
86.80%
84.73%
Performance of 200-299 MW Sets*
86.80%
85.78%
85.78%
68.98%
68.98%
85.73% 88.97%
80.16%
62.80%
10.41%
10.41% Plant Load
Operating
4.89% 6.64%
6.56%
Availability
Factor (PLF)
(OA)
Operating
Plant Load
Planned
Forced
Availability Factor (PLF) Maintenance
Outages
(OA)
due to Equip.
Planned
Maintenance
6.64
4.89%
6.56%
Forced
9.74%
6.15%Outages
4.51%
due to Equip.
Operating
Availability
(OA)
NERC member countries (North America, Canada, Europe part)
Plant Load
Planned
Factor (PLF) Maintenance
Force
Outag
due to E
BHEL Sets
* Average performance of thermal sets during 2007-2011; Source: North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC); 2013
13
PEAK LOAD V/S BASE LOAD
Need for diverse Fuel-Mix

Coal Based Plants can cater to Base Load

High Peak Demand Deficit

Need for Peaking Plants with faster start up

Gas-based plants preferred for this

Added Advantage: Cleaner fuel than coal
14
Recent Developments and Other Initiatives
For Long-term Power Optimization
• Gas Pricing Revision/Pooling of Gas prices
• Plan to pool Imported and Domestic coal prices
Linkage rationalization
Significant logistics benefits are possible if domestic and imported coals are
swapped between power plants.
Part Load operations
Power Plants in the Country are optimised to operate on full load and Part load
operations should be avoided.
Running number of plants on part load, operating some of the by turn on full load
and sharing the load would be a better option
Energy Efficiency
• Another source of energy which is affordable but under-exploited
• No adverse environmental impact
• Shift from ‘austerity’ focused ‘energy conservation’ to technology driven ‘energy
efficiency’ to ‘energy productivity’
15
CONCLUSION
 The Best energy strategy:
 Adopt a holistic and national power strategy
 Optimally develop domestic resources
 Deploy better technologies
 Adopt tariffs that accurately reflect fuel costs
 Reduce subsidies
 Minimize exposure to commodity prices by diversifying generation mix,
and
 Implement the right policies that will ensure that the path to progress
remains brightly lit
16
THANK
YOU
17
BACK UP
MANUFACTURING PROWESS (20,000 MW p.a.)
Keeping abreast with latest technological advancements
Bird’s eye view of Bhopal Plant
New Turbine Blade shop at Haridwar
Gas Turbine Rotor at Hyderabad
Hydro Turbine at Bhopal
19
MANUFACTURING PROWESS (20,000 MW p.a.)
Keeping abreast with latest technological advancements
Pipe Bender at Trichy
Generator shop at Haridwar
8000 tonnes hydraulic press at Trichy
Steam turbine rotor at Hyd
20
MAJOR DOMESIC MANUFACTURING
CAPACITIES
Manufacturer
SG Capacity
(MW)
TG Capacity
(MW)
BHEL
20,000
20,000
L&T-MHI
4,000
4,000
Alstom-Bharat Forge
0
3,000
Toshiba-JSW
0
3,000
Thermax-Babcock Wilcox
2,000
0
Doosan
2,000
0
Ansaldo-Gammon
0
0
BGR-Hitachi
0
0
28,000
30,000
TOTAL (MW)
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PARAMETERS OF THERMAL POWER PLANT
HPT inlet
temp
oC
565
IPT inlet
temp
oC
565
Pressure
ata
Efficiency
%
170
38.6
Super-critical
565
593
247
41
Ultra Super-critical
600
600
280
42
Advance Ultra Supercritical
710
720
310
46
Sub-critical
22
22
INFERIOR PERFORMANCE OF CHINESE SETS IMPACT ON HEAT RATE
Sl.
No.
DESCRIPTION
FORMULA
UNIT
BHEL SETS
MW
CHINESE SETS DIFFERENCE
A
TOTAL CAPACITY (Chinese sets commissioned in XI Plan)
18,187
B
NO OF UNITS GENERATED IN ONE YEAR AT 100% PLANT LOAD
FACTOR (PLF)
A x 1000 x 24 hrs
x 365 days x 1.00
KWHr (UNITS)
1,59,31,81,20,000
1,59,31,81,20,000
C
NO OF UNITS GENERATED IN ONE YEAR AT 85% PLANT LOAD
FACTOR (PLF)
B x 0.85
KWHr (UNITS)
1,35,42,04,02,000
1,35,42,04,02,000
D
COST OF COAL CONSIDERED
RS / TONNE
2,000
2,000
E
GROSS CALORIFIC VALUE (GCV) OF COAL CONSIDERED (*)
KCAL / KG
3,300
3,300
F
OPERATING HEAT RATE (OHR) - as per CEA Report
KCAL / KWhr
2,520
2,719
199
G
SPECIFIC COAL CONSUMPTION
F/E
KG / KWhr
0.76
0.82
0.06
H
TOTAL COAL CONSUMPTION IN ONE YEAR FOR GENERATION
CORRESPONDING TO 85% PLF
G x C / 1000
TONNES
10,34,11,943
11,15,78,204
81,66,261
I
TOTAL COST OF COAL FOR UNITS GENERATED ANNUALY
H x D / 10000000
RS CRORE
20,682.39
22,315.64
1,633.25
ANNUAL ADDITIONAL RECURRING COAL COST WITH CHINESE SETS = RS. 1,633.25 cr.
ADDITIONAL RECURRING COAL COST WITH CHINESE SETS DURING LIFE
TIME (25 yrs)
= Rs
40,831
crs.
(*) BASED ON GROSS CALORIFIC VALUE (GCV) OF BEST COAL SPECIFIED IN RECENT NTPC TENDER (NORTH KARANPURA)
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INFERIOR PERFORMANCE OF CHINESE SETS IMPACT OF SECONDARY FUEL CONSUMPTION
Sl.
No.
DESCRIPTION
A
TOTAL CAPACITY
B
NO. OF UNITS GENERATED IN ONE YEAR AT 100%
PLANT LOAD FACTOR (PLF)
C
NO OF UNITS GENERATED IN ONE YEAR AT 85%
PLANT LOAD FACTOR (PLF)
D
FORMULA
UNIT
BHEL SETS
MW
CHINESE SETS DIFFERENCE
18,187
A x 1000 x 24 hrs
x 365 days x 1.00
KWHr (UNITS)
1,59,31,81,20,000
1,59,31,81,20,000
B x 0.85
KWHr (UNITS)
1,35,42,04,02,000
1,35,42,04,02,000
COST OF SECONDARY FUEL OIL (HEAVY FUEL OIL HFO) (*)
Rs / Litre
52.50
52.50
E
SECONDARY FUEL OIL CONSUMPTION PER UNIT
ml / KWhr
3.06
6.13
3.07
F
TOTAL SECONDARY FUEL OIL CONSUMPTION IN ONE
YEAR FOR GENERATION CORRESPONDING TO 85%
PLF
E x C / 1000
LITRES
41,43,86,430
83,01,27,064
41,57,40,634
G
TOTAL COST OF SECONDARY FUEL OIL FOR UNITS
GENERATED ANNUALY
F x D / 10000000
RS CRORE
2,175.53
4,358.17
2,182.64
ANNUAL ADDITIONAL RECURRING COAL COST WITH CHINESE SETS = RS. 2,183 cr.
= Rs
ADDITIONAL RECURRING COAL COST WITH CHINESE SETS DURING
LIFE TIME (25 yrs.)
54,566
crs.
(*) BASED ON HFO RATE SPECIFIED IN OPGCL TENDER FOR IB VALLEY
24
Target
CAPACITY ADDITION ACHIEVEMENTS
Achievement in 5 Year Plans
High capacity Addition of 55 GW during XI Plan almost equal to combined achievement of previous 3 plan period
25